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The effect of stress and visible health problems on the intent to continue health food consumption

Edward S.-T. Wang (Graduate Institute of Bio-Industry Management, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan)
Yeah-Luen Li (Graduate Institute of Bio-Industry Management, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan)

British Food Journal

ISSN: 0007-070X

Publication date: 5 January 2015

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing importance of health food sales and the growing number of consumers purchasing health foods necessitates that marketers develop enhanced understanding of health food consumers. The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical extension to the health belief model (HBM) that integrates personal stress and environmental cues (visible health problems) with its constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a quantitative face-to-face survey of 384 health food consumers in Taiwan, and structural equation modelling was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results show that the perceived benefits and barriers of health foods are critical antecedents of continued-consumption intention. Personal stress and visible health problems substantially influence consumers’ perceived susceptibility to and severity of health problems, and perceived susceptibility consequently leads to consumer continued consumption. However, the results indicate an irrelevant relationship between perceived severity of health problems and continued-consumption intentions.

Originality/value

Based on the HBM, the authors integrated perceived stress and visible health problems into the health food consumer research. The findings can improve the understanding of managers in the health food market regarding the role that stress and visibility play in consumer decisions.

Keywords

Citation

Wang, E.S.-.-T. and Li, Y.-L. (2015), "The effect of stress and visible health problems on the intent to continue health food consumption", British Food Journal, Vol. 117 No. 1, pp. 302-317. https://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-09-2013-0275

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2015, Emerald Group Publishing Limited