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Service and safety quality in US airlines: pre‐ and post‐September 11th

Dawna L. Rhoades (College of Business, Embry‐Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida, USA)
Blaise P. Waguespack Jr (College of Business, Embry‐Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida, USA)

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal

ISSN: 0960-4529

Article publication date: 1 August 2004

Abstract

Although the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001 can be blamed for a number of problems currently plaguing the US airline industry, their effect on the service and safety quality of post‐9/11 airlines is mixed. This study places current industry quality in historical context by examining trends in both areas beginning in 1987. The findings indicate that the service quality improved among major US carriers for the period 1987‐1993 but began to deteriorate after this date, although it did not return to 1987 levels. Service quality again improves in 2001 and reaches its best level ever in 2002 as post‐9/11 changes appear to have improved on‐time performance, reduced overbooking, and lowered customer complaints. Two factors identified as important in service and safety quality, maintenance spending and load factor, were also explored. Results indicate that both service and safety quality improve as the level of maintenance spending increases.

Keywords

Citation

Rhoades, D.L. and Waguespack, B.P. (2004), "Service and safety quality in US airlines: pre‐ and post‐September 11th", Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, Vol. 14 No. 4, pp. 307-316. https://doi.org/10.1108/09604520410546842

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited