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Aesthetic theory and logo design: examining consumer response to proportion across cultures

Narelle Pittard (Department of Marketing, Monash University, Caulfield East, Australia)
Michael Ewing (Department of Marketing, Monash University, Caulfield East, Australia)
Colin Jevons (Department of Marketing, Monash University, Caulfield East, Australia)

International Marketing Review

ISSN: 0265-1335

Article publication date: 24 July 2007

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate reactions to the divine proportion (a ratio of 1: 1.618) in logo design across different cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is a survey in three different countries: Australia, Singapore and South Africa.

Findings

Results showed there is universal preference for the divine proportion across cultures. Logos based on forms found in nature that were expressed in the divine proportion were most preferred, but for artificially constructed logos, a 1:1 ratio was preferred.

Research limitations/implications

A limited set of ratios were considered. Further research could investigate different ratios and different logos.

Practical implications

International brand managers should commission designs that use natural forms based on the divine proportion. Different national cultures react similarly to logo designs, in contrast to many other fields of business where strong cultural differences exist.

Originality/value

This paper is the first exploration of responses to the divine proportion in logo design across cultures.

Keywords

Citation

Pittard, N., Ewing, M. and Jevons, C. (2007), "Aesthetic theory and logo design: examining consumer response to proportion across cultures", International Marketing Review, Vol. 24 No. 4, pp. 457-473. https://doi.org/10.1108/02651330710761026

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2007, Emerald Group Publishing Limited