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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2014

Matthew R. Griffis

This exploratory study, a Ph.D. dissertation completed at the University of Western Ontario in 2013, examines the materially embedded relations of power between library…

Abstract

This exploratory study, a Ph.D. dissertation completed at the University of Western Ontario in 2013, examines the materially embedded relations of power between library users and staff in public libraries and how building design regulates spatial behavior according to organizational objectives. It considers three public library buildings as organization spaces (Dale & Burrell, 2008) and determines the extent to which their spatial organizations reproduce the relations of power between the library and its public that originated with the modern public library building type ca. 1900. Adopting a multicase study design, I conducted site visits to three, purposefully selected public library buildings of similar size but various ages. Site visits included: blueprint analysis; organizational document analysis; in-depth, semi-structured interviews with library users and library staff; cognitive mapping exercises; observations; and photography.

Despite newer approaches to designing public library buildings, the use of newer information technologies, and the emergence of newer paradigms of library service delivery (e.g., the user-centered model), findings strongly suggest that the library as an organization still relies on many of the same socio-spatial models of control as it did one century ago when public library design first became standardized. The three public libraries examined show spatial organizations that were designed primarily with the librarian, library materials, and library operations in mind far more than the library user or the user’s many needs. This not only calls into question the public library’s progressiveness over the last century but also hints at its ability to survive in the new century.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-744-3

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Pia Storvang and Bang Nguyen

More and more companies use physical space as a way to enhance creativity, create change and stimulate interaction. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how space

Abstract

Purpose

More and more companies use physical space as a way to enhance creativity, create change and stimulate interaction. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how space affects this interrelationship and explores how space can support organizational strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach, this study explores three cases from an educational, a cultural and an industrial setting to illustrate how space can be used to support an organization’s policy and help its strategic intentions.

Findings

The findings demonstrate how space can be used to enhance organizational strategy and demonstrate how closely the creation of space can be related to the development of that strategy. Specifically, the study finds that the “’space-organizational strategy’ link has three uses: “Space as an organizational meeting place” in the University campus, (2) “Space as a network organization” in the culture and production center and (3) “Space as a cell organization” in the private manufacturing company.

Originality/value

The study will show that the design and operationalization of spaces can influence management and organizational strategy because space influences relations between people and that organizations can use space to support their strategic intentions seems to have been overlooked in the literature.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

Victor Dos Santos Paulino

The adaptation perspective dominates the issue of organizational change and assumes that organizational inertia increases organizational mortality. This assumption is…

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2245

Abstract

Purpose

The adaptation perspective dominates the issue of organizational change and assumes that organizational inertia increases organizational mortality. This assumption is inadequate to analyze organizational change in risky activities. The purpose of this paper is to underline the relevance of organizational inertia when organizations face risky environments.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework was built that combines the adaptation and selection perspectives from the evolutionary approach and the high‐reliability organizations literature and apply it to space activities.

Findings

First, it was found that to prevent catastrophic failures, space organizations reproduce routines validated in previous successful programs, which leads to situations of organizational inertia; and second, the opposing perspectives of selection and adaptation become complementary when the author focus on the level of risk faced by organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on space organizations and not more general types of organizations. However, the findings could be generalized to organizations manufacturing complex products and systems.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper is based on the new empirical and theoretical frameworks provided to analyze organizational inertia. Organizational inertia may be a satisfying response to environments favoring organizations with high levels of reliability. This new way of viewing inertia would be of value to scholars studying organizations in which errors can have catastrophic consequences.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Henry Wai‐chung Yeung

Through an intervention from a geographical perspective on organizational space, this article aims to offer a new horizon in understanding international business strategy.

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3133

Abstract

Purpose

Through an intervention from a geographical perspective on organizational space, this article aims to offer a new horizon in understanding international business strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Starts with two interrelated questions: does space exist in organizations and how does an organization manipulate and produce this organizational space in order to gain competitive advantage? By tackling these questions in the context of international business activities, this paper engages existing (international) management theories.

Findings

This article critically reviews the narrow focus of most international business theories on physical location and distance as a significant determinant of foreign direct investment and diverse activities of transnational corporations (TNCs). Quantitative empirical studies in this genre tend to emphasize physical space as a mere “container” of different locations of TNC activities and to measure the distance between these locations as an independent variable in statistical models. Drawing upon recent theoretical developments in economic geography, the paper develops a relational perspective on business organizations. In such an organization space, there are no fixed locations manifesting themselves in physically measurable forms. Instead, locations and distances in an organizational space are relational and thus discursively constructed through actor‐specific strategies and practice. The paper argues that one key strategic goal of business organizations is to continuously expand its organizational space (viz. physical space) and to economize on this spatial expansion.

Research limitations/implications

Reveals the need for a critical reexamination of existing management and organization theories to take account of how space and boundaries may influence the strategy, structure, and performance of business organizations.

Originality/value

Examines the properties of organizational space and applies the proposed concept to the case of TNCs.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2020

François-Xavier de Vaujany, Emmanuelle Vaast, Stewart R. Clegg and Jeremy Aroles

The purpose of this paper is to understand how historical materialities might play a contemporary role in legitimation processes through the memorialization of history and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how historical materialities might play a contemporary role in legitimation processes through the memorialization of history and its reproduction in the here-and-now of organizations and organizing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors briefly review the existing management and organization studies (MOS) literature on legitimacy, space and history; engage with the work of Merleau-Ponty to explore how organizational legitimacy is managed in time and space; and use the case of two Parisian universities to illustrate the main arguments of the paper.

Findings

The paper develops a history-based phenomenological perspective on legitimation processes constitutive of four possibilities identified by means of chiasms: heterotopic spatial legacy, thin spatial legacy, institutionalized spatial legacy and organizational spatial legacy.

Research limitations/implications

The authors discuss the implications of this research for the neo-institutional literature on organizational legitimacy, research on organizational space and the field of management history.

Originality/value

This paper takes inspiration from the work of Merleau-Ponty on chiasms to conceptualize how the temporal layers of space and place that organizations inhabit and inherit (which we call “spatial legacies”), in the process of legitimation, evoke a sensible tenor.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2010

John W. Mohr and Francesca Guerra-Pearson

Miller McPherson's approach to measuring the inherent duality of organizational forms and the environmental niches that they occupy is adapted and applied to an analysis…

Abstract

Miller McPherson's approach to measuring the inherent duality of organizational forms and the environmental niches that they occupy is adapted and applied to an analysis of the institutional field of (outdoor) poverty relief organizations operating in New York City (1888–1917). In contrast to McPherson's approach that emphasizes how organizations are differentially arrayed within “Blau space,” this chapter focuses on how organizational forms are distributed across an institutional “logic space” that is itself dually ordered and defined by the kinds of organizational forms that are understood to exist. The resulting niche maps are employed to trace out the jurisdictional conflicts that erupted during the Progressive Era between two competing organizational forms – scientific charities and settlement houses – each of which embodied a particular vision and practice for delivering social relief to the poor.

Details

Categories in Markets: Origins and Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-594-6

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2017

Jessica Burshell and Will Mitchell

Studies of the social construction of markets have not determined which social environments, which we refer to as proximate social space, are most likely to trigger social…

Abstract

Studies of the social construction of markets have not determined which social environments, which we refer to as proximate social space, are most likely to trigger social construction processes. We find that U.S. nonprofit fiscal sponsors respond to greater potential for category emergence when proximate social space is defined by geography but not by market segment. Further, in addition to responding to potential claimants based on geographic peers, organizations also respond to actual claimants based on peers in the market segment. The pattern suggests that geographic social proximity triggers initial label claiming, which in turn triggers responses from market segment peers.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2017

Ayça Arslan and Türkan Ulusu Uraz

It has recently come to light that there is an increasing demand for a new type of small house design, which vary in area from 20 square metres to 100 square metres and…

Abstract

It has recently come to light that there is an increasing demand for a new type of small house design, which vary in area from 20 square metres to 100 square metres and even more. Being remarkably different from traditional types of spatial organizations, the new house types present an open plan concept with a highly flexible and adaptable spatial arrangement that exhibit diverse functional spaces within one open, integrated space.

In light of this, the main aim of this study is to reveal the new dynamics of spatial organization found in today's small house types and identify the significant changes in the contemporary design approaches to small house layouts which have evolved from a need for minimized space usage and a requirement for diverse living spatiality.

Subsequently, thirty houses have been chosen to be analysed for the purpose of this study to reveal the differences between integrated and segregated spatial organizations in regard to flexibility, adaptability, transformability and permeability within the spaces. In addition to this, the new spatial relations will be overviewed considering spatial depth, interpenetration and density to define more implicit organizations which are able to expand constantly and accommodate different functional spaces in one open space with the help of spatial identifiers.

The main focus of this research study concentrates on the above mentioned dynamic forms of spatiality that change from being weak to strong, implicit to explicit and indistinct to clearly defined spaces. These forms are measured, analysed and basically compare by means of a space syntax application on the values of the space and convex maps of the thirty selected houses.

In summary, the analysis and measurement of the spatial characteristics of contemporary small houses in this sphere include both theoretical and empirical components. Firstly, the study discusses the basic definitions of spatial relations and organizations. Secondly, the space syntax method was used to test and compare new spatial design approaches by means of the Mean Depth, Mean Integration, Basic Difference Factor and Space Link Ratio values mainly to clarify how the spatiality changes according to the size although the plan type stays the same as 1+1.

Details

Open House International, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2007

Janusz Wielki

The purpose of this paper is, firstly, an analysis of the behavior of entities operating in the virtual space (termed in the paper “e‐space”) which has emerged and has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is, firstly, an analysis of the behavior of entities operating in the virtual space (termed in the paper “e‐space”) which has emerged and has been continuously developing around the internet (understood in a purely technical way as a global network infrastructure) and, secondly, to create a framework of the impact of these entities on an organization, especially in the context of emerging new ethical challenges. The motivation for undertaking this research was a lack of literature on such a holistic approach to this important problem facing contemporary organizations and the systematization of these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework proposed in the paper was developed based on analyses of case studies of organizations from various industries which use the internet and the inter‐related mobile infrastructure. To create this framework the stakeholder theory and the cost‐benefit analysis approach were used.

Findings

The basic findings of the paper include a classification of the entities operating in e‐space and a taxonomy of the possible influences they may have on an organization. It is intended that the proposed framework be tested in selected industries.

Practical implications

It seems that the holistic approach presented in this paper has significant practical implications for the increasing number of organizations utilizing the on‐line environment in their business practices, offering them a far better understanding of the whole complexity of problems and challenges connected with the e‐economy phenomena.

Originality/value

The new and original aspects of the paper are the introduction and defining of the term e‐space; a classification of the elements operating there and the proposal of a taxonomy of the possible types of influence of these entities on an organization.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2020

Grégory Jemine, François Pichault and Christophe Dubois

While more and more organizations commit to transformation projects with the aim of redesigning simultaneously their workspaces, work organization, and technologies, the…

Abstract

Purpose

While more and more organizations commit to transformation projects with the aim of redesigning simultaneously their workspaces, work organization, and technologies, the design process supporting such projects remains largely understudied. This paper examines the political tensions that occur when such processes unfold as well as their implications for project management. By doing so, the paper counterbalances the prescriptive and normative literature on “New Ways of Working” which largely overlooks the political complexity of such projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a qualitative study of a triple design process in a media company. Data collection mainly consists of a nine-month process of non-participant observation of weekly meetings held by the strategic group in charge of the project. Semi-structured interviews with members of the executive committee have also been conducted.

Findings

The analysis illustrates how space, organization and technology are gradually designed and structured. Four interconnected and often concealed mechanisms that support triple design processes are identified: political tensions, unexpected twists, conflicting temporalities and arbitration measures.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper lies in breaking down the concept of design in three separate objects – organization, space and technology – and examining how these objects were conjointly problematized by an organization in transformation, whereas existing studies often investigate organization design, space design or technology design in isolation.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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