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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Corina Pascu, David Osimo, Geomina Turlea, Martin Ulbrich, Yves Punie and Jean‐Claude Burgelman

The purpose of this paper is to assess the main implications for innovation and competitiveness of social computing trends that promote swift social and economic relations. They

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the main implications for innovation and competitiveness of social computing trends that promote swift social and economic relations. They are increasingly being considered by policymakers, both as tool and object for policymaking (i.e. how social computing could play a role in information society policies). Therefore, a general issue for the paper is represented by the lessons to be learned in terms of policy‐related consequences for Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an extensive desk‐based survey of secondary data available from reports, studies and most recent statistics, from internet audience measurement companies, international research companies, research projects of non‐profit centers, international firms or the industry itself.

Findings

The diffusion and usage of social computing applications have been growing at an exponential rate. A powerful feature emerges, i.e. the new user as supplier, co‐producer or innovator of the service. New areas of innovation lie at the crossroads of an increasingly complex process of both tacit and codified knowledge production. They affect the way people find information, learn, share, communicate and consume and the way business is done. New players and markets provide significant threats and opportunities for the ICT and media industries. New players have a smaller cost base, viable business models and a real market.

Research limitations/implications

Comparative and systematic research of the fast growing social computing trends is needed over longer periods of time.

Practical implications

The paper provides the first evidence on the size and weight of these trends, as well as on their social and economic relevance. It raises the need for more research, e.g. on the areas that would be most impacted and to what extent, as well as a wealth of policy‐related research questions.

Originality/value

Since social computing is an emerging phenomenon, the work is innovative and novel because it attempts to draw a first solid overall picture of the development of these trends.

Details

Foresight, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2005

Cecile K. M. Crutzen

Questioning gender is about taking an active, critical role in the technological design of our daily behaviour. It is a deconstruction of the oppositions that exist in the…

Abstract

Questioning gender is about taking an active, critical role in the technological design of our daily behaviour. It is a deconstruction of the oppositions that exist in the discourses of Ambient Intelligence designers, the ICT industry and computer scientists. What underlies the assumption that Ambient Intelligence will, by disappearing into our environment, bring humans both an easy and entertaining life? The gender perspective can uncover power relations within the promotion and realisation of Ambient Intelligence that satisfy an obvious wish for a technological heaven. The deconstruction of the promise of progress and a better life reveals what is overvalued, what is undervalued and what is ignored. This paper is a deconstruction of the view, currently prevalent in the discourses of Ambient Intelligence; a view of humans and the way they live. A view that will influence the way women and men will be allowed to construct their lives.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Evi Hatziandreou, Anthi Soulitsioti and Yannis Mastrogeorgiou

The most valuable resource of the European Union (EU) is its youth. The EU’s future depends on young people’s ability to identify themselves as Europeans, that is, united by a…

Abstract

The most valuable resource of the European Union (EU) is its youth. The EU’s future depends on young people’s ability to identify themselves as Europeans, that is, united by a shared European identity and a solid commitment to be active EU citizens. Young people want and need to know more about what it means to be an EU citizen. However, the younger generation needs better education as to what the EU is, what it represents and how their daily lives are positively influenced because of the EU. With the intention to bring EU topics closer to the daily lives of students, we developed an innovative, user-friendly educational game titled ‘Do we all speak the same language in Europe?’ to convey to the audience an essential message, that is, there are common roots that over centuries have shaped who we are. This chapter elaborates the rationale behind the educational game, outlines the rules of the game and discusses its value added by referencing the survey filled out by students who actually played the game. Conclusions and recommendations follow.

Details

The Future of Innovation and Technology in Education: Policies and Practices for Teaching and Learning Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-555-5

Keywords

Content available
222

Abstract

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 62 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Paul Desruelle and Jean‐Claude Burgelman

Presents a view of the forecast impact of e‐commerce on developments of value chains in several economic sectors, with a time horizon of 2005. Highlights the scenarios that were…

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Abstract

Presents a view of the forecast impact of e‐commerce on developments of value chains in several economic sectors, with a time horizon of 2005. Highlights the scenarios that were built and demonstrates that the impact of e‐commerce technologies on value chains may vary widely across firms and sectors, as a function of sector‐specific characteristics. Concludes that the impact of e‐commerce technologies and practices on firms in the current decade may be expected to be of the same magnitude as the impact of management techniques such as just‐in‐time, or total quality management, in the 1990s.

Details

info, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Valentina Goglio and Sonia Bertolini

The study aims to investigate whether participation to massive open online courses (MOOCs) may lead to labor market returns and through which mechanisms such relative advantage…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to investigate whether participation to massive open online courses (MOOCs) may lead to labor market returns and through which mechanisms such relative advantage may take place. Indeed, despite high figures of registered users, empirical studies on occupational returns are limited and MOOCs may represent a viable, cost-efficient example of lifelong learning practice to respond to the demand of a better skilled workforce for the fourth industrial revolution.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on qualitative empirical material constituted by a set of 21 qualitative semi-structured interviews conducted in 2019 among learners who registered in MOOCs provided by European higher education institutions.

Findings

Interviews return a situation in which MOOCs are beneficial for work: learners appreciate the new knowledge and skills they can access, with time flexibility and low entry cost. However, MOOCs positive contribution is not at everyone’s reach: self-selection issues tend to further advantage individuals with high levels of education and individual resources. Moreover, MOOCs can increase the risk of a shift of responsibility for training to the employees and qualify as a lower tier type of qualification, reinforcing social closure mechanisms based on educational credentials.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the empirical analysis of MOOCs economic returns empirically, by providing original qualitative material. Second, it contributes theoretically by bridging literature on economic and occupational returns to education on one side and literature on digital technologies in education on the other, providing new insights on the potentials and limits of MOOCs as a new form of lifelong learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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