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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Kay Morris Matthews

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of ongoing conversations between researchers and librarians. Without such conversations followed by the active…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of ongoing conversations between researchers and librarians. Without such conversations followed by the active purchasing of manuscripts, the important contributions of individual first settlers would likely remain untold. The research review that unfolds here is of one of New Zealand's significant first settlers, William Colenso (1811-1899). Yet, 30 years ago William Colenso was mostly regarded as a local rather than a national figure, renowned and ridiculed for his being dismissed from the Church Missionary Society for moral impropriety in 1852. By 2011, however, a conference dedicated to his life and work attracted both national and international scholars raising awareness and contributing unique knowledge about Colenso as missionary, printer, linguist, explorer, botanist, politician, author and inspector of schools. It is argued that such scholarship was enabled through the purposeful collecting of Colenso's papers over 30 years.

Design/methodology/approach

The historical analysis draws from original documents and published papers chronicling the role and the views of one of New Zealand's first inspector of schools. A self-reflective review approach will show how new knowledge can enhance earlier published works and provide opportunities for further analysis.

Findings

It will be demonstrated that as a result of ongoing conversations between librarians and researchers purposeful buying of archives and manuscripts have added fresh perspectives to the contributions William Colenso made to education in provincial New Zealand.

Originality/value

This work is perhaps the first critical re-reading and review of one's own scholarship undertaken across 30 years within New Zealand history of education. It offers unique self-reflections on the subject focus and analyses of it over time.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Rich Crime, Poor Crime: Inequality and the Rule of Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-822-2

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1911

Many of the difficulties that have been experienced by Health Authorities in this country in the examination of imported butcher's “offal”—using the term “offal” in its trade…

Abstract

Many of the difficulties that have been experienced by Health Authorities in this country in the examination of imported butcher's “offal”—using the term “offal” in its trade sense—would seem to have been due to injudicious methods of packing on the other side. The organs that constitute “offal”—livers, plucks, kidneys, sweetbreads, and so forth—have hitherto been closely packed into a bag, box, or crate, and the whole mass then frozen hard. Hence on arrival at the port of inspection the separate examination of these organs for possible disease conditions was rendered a matter of extreme difficulty. The exporters have now, it appears, almost all arranged for the separate freezing of the larger organs before packing, and in the case of smaller organs, such as kidneys and sweetbreads, some packers now make use of shallow boxes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2018

Lindsey M. Ibañez and Steven H. Lopez

Job loss and long-term unemployment can have pervasive negative impacts on well-being. At its most extreme, unemployment is accompanied by feelings of shame, humiliation…

Abstract

Job loss and long-term unemployment can have pervasive negative impacts on well-being. At its most extreme, unemployment is accompanied by feelings of shame, humiliation, insecurity, and worthlessness, as well as damage to cherished identities and narratives of self. Scholars have investigated how the unemployed attempt to repair these damaged identities, but little is known about how network members participate in the identity reconstruction process. Social support has been shown to ameliorate the negative psychological effects of unemployment, but studies have also found that the unemployed are reluctant to ask for assistance and often perceive network members as a source of stress rather than as a source of support. To understand why social support can be experienced both positively and negatively by the unemployed, we draw upon 84 in-depth qualitative interviews with men and women who experienced unemployment during the extended economic downturn associated with the Great Recession. We find that social support ameliorates unemployment when it bolsters identities important to recipients, and exacerbates unemployment when it undermines such identities. We also show how the unemployed respond to identity-threatening support: by avoiding it, rejecting it, or reframing it as reciprocity. Our analysis contributes new insights into the relationship between social support and identities, as well as a deeper understanding of the noneconomic costs of the slow economic recovery following the Great Recession.

Details

Race, Identity and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-501-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Kay Whitehead

The purpose of this paper is to explore Australian educators’ work with “other people’s children” (OPCs) (Delpit, 2006) from the informal education market of the 1840s to the mass…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore Australian educators’ work with “other people’s children” (OPCs) (Delpit, 2006) from the informal education market of the 1840s to the mass education market in contemporary times.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is structured as a narrative about the expansion of the educational state and the concomitant development of technologies of inclusion and exclusion. Snapshots of various educators’ work with “OPCs” are woven into the narrative.

Findings

Notwithstanding contemporary efforts to “confront educational disadvantage” and an ever increasing array of technologies with which to differentiate students, OPCs remain on the margins of Australian education.

Originality/value

This paper is a unique look at Australian educators’ work with “OPCs” over the past 175 years.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1970

THE Conservative Government elected on June 18th last has lost no time in putting into practice its avowed principle of reducing direct taxation. Late in July it flew a kite…

Abstract

THE Conservative Government elected on June 18th last has lost no time in putting into practice its avowed principle of reducing direct taxation. Late in July it flew a kite through an inspired leak showing that it intended to save millions on education, one small part of which would be £10 million, purporting to be “saved” by making readers pay for books borrowed through public libraries. First indications of this were in a story included in The Guardian, Daily Telegraph and other papers, and as this story was not denied by the Government, the Library Association thought it proper to issue a press statement immediately, with the message that the Association was totally opposed to the introduction of such charges.

Details

New Library World, vol. 72 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2022

Ngoc Dung Tran, Phuong Hoa Dinh, Dinh Hoang Uyen Nguyen and Van Vinh Nguyen

This paper aims to investigate “corporate governance” of the English East India Company (EIC) in the late 17th century through a case study of the Tonkin factory (1672–1697).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate “corporate governance” of the English East India Company (EIC) in the late 17th century through a case study of the Tonkin factory (1672–1697).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon British primary materials relating to the Tonkin factory to examine and analyze the EIC’s style of management in Tonkin (Vietnam) and Bantam (Java). Qualitative and comparative methods are applied to the analysis of reports, records and letters written by EIC staff.

Findings

The paper finds that the EIC faced principal-agent problems as it had difficulties administering its distant agents and subsidiaries in the 17th century. London was strategically weakened, both by the limiting power of regional headquarters and by its use of experienced factors. Before 1682, London failed to temper the Bantam Council’s influence, and there were serious internal conflicts and power struggles between English Tonkin employees seeking to improve their positions. After 1686, London successfully forced Madras to adopt a noninterventionist stance in Tonkin’s business, but it faced the problem of “adverse selection.”

Originality/value

This paper provides evidence from the Tonkin factory (1672–1697) to show the EIC’s governance in the perspective of the agency theory.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1977

NOW here is Mr. Leslie Huckfield speaking at the annual conference of the British Council of Productivity Associations. He (but of course!) is Parliamentary Under‐Secretary of…

Abstract

NOW here is Mr. Leslie Huckfield speaking at the annual conference of the British Council of Productivity Associations. He (but of course!) is Parliamentary Under‐Secretary of State at the Department of Industry. He said “The Budget recognises the need to increase incentives at all levels in industry and particularly to improve the position of skilled workers and middle managers.”

Details

Work Study, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

William W. Keep and Peter J. Vander Nat

This paper aims to analyze the evolution of direct selling – a retail channel that successfully sold products ranging from cosmetics to radios to automobiles – to multilevel…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the evolution of direct selling – a retail channel that successfully sold products ranging from cosmetics to radios to automobiles – to multilevel marketing (MLM), an industry now apparently heavily reliant on selling to itself. As the courts have found some MLM companies to be pyramid schemes, the analysis includes the overlap between the legal MLM model and an illegal pyramid scheme.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of direct selling in the USA was examined, followed by the factors contributing to the design and growth of the MLM model and its non-commission-based compensation structure. Then, the key legal decisions regarding illegal pyramid schemes operating under the guise of MLM, the relative stagnation of direct selling and the state of the MLM industry were examined.

Findings

As the MLM model operates on the dual premise of retailing through a network of distributors and recruiting new distributors to do the same, it was found that federal regulators and the courts consistently focus on the “retail question” – the existence and extent of sales to consumers external to the distributor network. The authors argue that without a significant external customer base, internal consumption by an ever-churning base of participants resembles neither employee purchases nor a buying club.

Social implications

As the MLM model facilitated the growth of pyramid scheme fraud, creating victims rather than customers, this research highlights successful efforts to regulate this type of consumer fraud.

Originality/value

Few papers have been written on MLM and pyramids schemes, and none thus far has taken an historical perspective.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

David J. Burns, Chris Manolis and William W. Keep

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of fear of crime on consumer shopping intentions at a secondary business district in the USA.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of fear of crime on consumer shopping intentions at a secondary business district in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methodologies are used to first develop factors associated with fear of crime. These factors are then tested quantitatively with a sample of residents from a community bordering an established secondary shopping district. The model, which also includes behavior and subjective social norms as explanatory variables, is tested using multiple ordinary least square regression.

Findings

Only a single factor associated with fear of crime (which includes measures of vagrancies, lighting, and cleanliness) is found to be significantly related to shopping intentions. The findings do not differ between males and females. The remaining five factors associated with fear of crime are not significantly related to shopping intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited to a single location and measures shopping intentions but not actual shopping activity. Future research can build in these two areas.

Practical implications

Retailers located in older shopping districts are challenged to renew interest among shoppers. This paper suggests that by focusing on a few key environmental characteristics, retailers can reduce the fear of crime and improve consumers' shopping intentions.

Originality/value

Given the many older, secondary shopping districts, this paper is one of a few to link specific shopping district characteristics to fear of crime and shopping intentions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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