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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Polona Vilar and Vlasta Zabukovec

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences between scientific disciplines (SDs) in Slovenia in research data literacy (RDL) and research data management (RDM) to…

1434

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences between scientific disciplines (SDs) in Slovenia in research data literacy (RDL) and research data management (RDM) to form recommendations regarding how to move things forward on the institutional and national level.

Design/methodology/approach

Purposive sample of active researchers was used from widest possible range of SD. Data were collected from April 21 to August 7, 2017, using 24-question online survey (5 demographic, 19 content questions (single/multiple choice and Likert scale type). Bivariate (ANOVA) and multivariate methods (clustering) were used.

Findings

The authors identified three perception-related and four behavior-related connections; this gave three clusters per area. First, perceptions – skeptical group, mainly social (SocS) and natural sciences (NatS): no clear RDM and ethical issues standpoints, do not agree that every university needs a data management plan (DMP). Careful group, again including mainly SocS and NatS: RDM is problematic and linked to ethical dilemmas, positive toward institutional DMPs. Convinced group, mainly from humanities (HUM), NatS, engineering (ENG) and medicine and health sciences (MedHeS): no problems regarding RDM, agrees this is an ethical question, is positive toward institutional DMP’s. Second, behaviors – sparse group, mainly from MedHeS, NatS and HUM, some agricultural scientists (AgS), and some SocS and ENG: do not tag data sets with metadata, do not use file-naming conventions/standards. Frequent group – many ENG, SocS, moderate numbers of NatS, very few AgS and only a few MedHeS and HUM: often use file-naming conventions/standards, version-control systems, have experience with public-domain data, are reluctant to use metadata with their RD. Slender group, mainly from AgS and NatS, moderate numbers of ENG, SocS and HUM, but no MedHeS: often use public-domain data, other three activities are rare.

Research limitations/implications

Research could be expanded to a wider population, include other stakeholders and use qualitative methods.

Practical implications

Results are useful for international comparisons but also give foundations and recommendations on institutional and national RDM and RDL policies, implementations, and how to bring academic libraries into the picture. Identified differences suggest that different educational, awareness-raising and participatory approaches are needed for each group.

Originality/value

The findings offer valuable insight into RDM and RDL of Slovenian scientists, which have not yet been investigated in Slovenia.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

David Bawden, Polona Vilar and Vlasta Zabukovec

To determine and compare approaches to the education and training of librarians for work in digital libraries. More precisely, to identify – in general terms, rather than…

2874

Abstract

Purpose

To determine and compare approaches to the education and training of librarians for work in digital libraries. More precisely, to identify – in general terms, rather than specifically – the important competencies required by information professionals in creating and managing digital libraries, and in facilitating their use, and to assess how these competencies are treated in LIS education and training, and therefore how the capacities of the information professions are being developed.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature analysis of the skill sets required by librarians working with digital materials. Evaluation of formal education and of professional development programmes in the UK and in Slovenia, to assess how these needs are being met.

Findings

Both formal education and continuing development training are adapting to cover aspects of the digital library environment, both in the UK and in Slovenia. This is happening as part of the normal process of the redesign of degree programmes and of training courses. Digital library skills and knowledge – embodying conceptual, semantic, syntactic and technical aspects – are being included in existing courses, for the most part, rather than in entities labelled “digital library”. This approach has strengths and also weaknesses. While there is some agreement on core topics, there is much variation in how they are presented, and in the relative importance given to them.

Research limitations/implications

Based on comparison of education and training programmes in two countries, the UK and Slovenia.

Practical implications

Recommendations for curricula are made.

Originality/value

Provides an insight into education and training needs in a developing and important area.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Sanjica Faletar

conference held in Dubrovnik, May 2004, which had the dual theme of human information behaviour and competences for digital libraries.

1647

Abstract

conference held in Dubrovnik, May 2004, which had the dual theme of human information behaviour and competences for digital libraries.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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