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Abstract

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Tribal Wisdom for Business Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-288-0

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Vincent J. Pascal

402

Abstract

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Jonathan Deacon, Vincent J. Pascal and Robert G. Schwartz

This paper seeks to explore linguistic nuances in responses to the definition of marketing for entrepreneurs in technology and non‐technology firms located in the US and UK. The…

358

Abstract

This paper seeks to explore linguistic nuances in responses to the definition of marketing for entrepreneurs in technology and non‐technology firms located in the US and UK. The present study focuses on an open ended marketing question and applies a hermeneutic analysis to the data. The results appear to suggest that differences exist between US and their UK counterparts on how they define marketing, such that UK firms “individualize” their application of marketing while the US firms “professionalize” the function.

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Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Vincent J. Pascal

As interest in clusters has increased in recent decades, so has related research. To date, studies have explored the advantages of location within a cluster from an economic…

Abstract

As interest in clusters has increased in recent decades, so has related research. To date, studies have explored the advantages of location within a cluster from an economic perspective, and much print has been devoted to describing clusters. Still to be addressed, however, is the question of whether economic advantage varies by cluster type and whether the competitive advantages that accrue to cluster firms vary according to both the location of the clusters and their concentration. Similarly, no empirical research has yet been carried out that specifically addresses the impact of clusters on entrepreneurial activity, in an effort to determine whether they enhance such activity. This paper begins by reviewing they key literature concerning cluster development and entrepreneurship. Hypotheses regarding the intensity of entrepreneurial activity in relation to cluster location and concentration are then presented and evaluated. The findings suggest that concentrations of multiple clusters do serve to enhance entrepreneurial activity and that, consequently, certain regions are naturally advantaged by the presence of these concentrations. A discussion follows, in which the implications of these findings for entrepreneurship and for regional policymakers are considered. Finally, directions for future research are proposed.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Brian Grinder, Vincent J. Pascal and Robert G. Schwartz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of the early American clock industry as an entrepreneurial endeavor and to focus on the innovative marketing and financing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of the early American clock industry as an entrepreneurial endeavor and to focus on the innovative marketing and financing practices that helped transform the industry during the first half of the nineteenth century.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the historical method to identify the critical factors that allowed the clock industry to expand. Primary sources were consulted whenever they were available, and a survey of the existing clock literature was conducted.

Findings

The nineteenth century New England clock industry provides a rich field of exploration into the entrepreneurial practices of the early American Republic and provides us with many insights that are applicable to the modern entrepreneur. The clock makers and peddlers who moved clock making from a backwater cottage industry to a modern international industry are examples of entrepreneurship at its best. From a marketing perspective, the clockmakers made use of the existing peddler system in order to create a market for their products. From a financial perspective, the clockmakers innovated when a ready source of capital was unavailable and made extensive use of credit.

Practical implications

This paper points out the importance of viewing entrepreneurship from a historical perspective. Furthermore, it finds that successful clock entrepreneurs understand the usefulness of connections, recognize traps to be avoided (such as the “Cottage Industry Syndrome”), and resolve to be persistent and optimistic in the face of adversity.

Originality/value

This is the first study of the early American clock industry to consider the entrepreneurial aspects that contributed to its successful transformation into an international industry.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Tribal Wisdom for Business Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-288-0

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Jonathan H. Deacon

399

Abstract

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Tribal Wisdom for Business Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-288-0

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

John Conway O'Brien

A collection of essays by a social economist seeking to balanceeconomics as a science of means with the values deemed necessary toman′s finding the good life and society enduring…

1164

Abstract

A collection of essays by a social economist seeking to balance economics as a science of means with the values deemed necessary to man′s finding the good life and society enduring as a civilized instrumentality. Looks for authority to great men of the past and to today′s moral philosopher: man is an ethical animal. The 13 essays are: 1. Evolutionary Economics: The End of It All? which challenges the view that Darwinism destroyed belief in a universe of purpose and design; 2. Schmoller′s Political Economy: Its Psychic, Moral and Legal Foundations, which centres on the belief that time‐honoured ethical values prevail in an economy formed by ties of common sentiment, ideas, customs and laws; 3. Adam Smith by Gustav von Schmoller – Schmoller rejects Smith′s natural law and sees him as simply spreading the message of Calvinism; 4. Pierre‐Joseph Proudhon, Socialist – Karl Marx, Communist: A Comparison; 5. Marxism and the Instauration of Man, which raises the question for Marx: is the flowering of the new man in Communist society the ultimate end to the dialectical movement of history?; 6. Ethical Progress and Economic Growth in Western Civilization; 7. Ethical Principles in American Society: An Appraisal; 8. The Ugent Need for a Consensus on Moral Values, which focuses on the real dangers inherent in there being no consensus on moral values; 9. Human Resources and the Good Society – man is not to be treated as an economic resource; man′s moral and material wellbeing is the goal; 10. The Social Economist on the Modern Dilemma: Ethical Dwarfs and Nuclear Giants, which argues that it is imperative to distinguish good from evil and to act accordingly: existentialism, situation ethics and evolutionary ethics savour of nihilism; 11. Ethical Principles: The Economist′s Quandary, which is the difficulty of balancing the claims of disinterested science and of the urge to better the human condition; 12. The Role of Government in the Advancement of Cultural Values, which discusses censorship and the funding of art against the background of the US Helms Amendment; 13. Man at the Crossroads draws earlier themes together; the author makes the case for rejecting determinism and the “operant conditioning” of the Skinner school in favour of the moral progress of autonomous man through adherence to traditional ethical values.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 19 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

J. Dalton Stevens

To understand how young men with disabilities react against overarching narratives of independence during the transition to adulthood in independent living and interdependent…

Abstract

Purpose

To understand how young men with disabilities react against overarching narratives of independence during the transition to adulthood in independent living and interdependent living arrangements with parents in order to address the gap between transition policy and real lived experience.

Methods/Approach

I use life history interviews and ethnographic “go-alongs” with nine men with mobility impairments to understand how they experience and make sense of independent living and interdependence during the transition to adulthood. Transcripts and field notes were analyzed using grounded theory methodology.

Findings

Data reveal diverging pathways participants took to interdependent living situation, rooting before transition, and returning during transition. These pathways are shaped by logics of residential decision-making: accessibility expectations and individual adaptability. Those who rooted before transition developed accessibility expectations that motivated them to remain living their parents’ homes while those who returned during transition relied on individual adaptability to overcome physical inaccessibility. Individual adaptability did not overcome inaccessibility – all returned to their parents’ homes. Pathways shape how each group of participants experienced and made sense of interdependent living arrangements and independent living. Those who rooted before transition found interdependence to be a route to increased independence, and did not consider independent living a marker of adulthood. Those who returned during transition found that the interdependence they experienced increased feelings of dependence.

Implications/Value

Experiences and meanings emerging adults with disabilities have during the transition to adulthood reveal the complexity of interdependence and independent living. The pathways and the social forces shaping those pathways to interdependent living arrangements have implications for life course theory and disability policy.

Details

New Narratives of Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-144-5

Keywords

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