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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Steven H. Appelbaum, Vincent Harel and Barbara Shapiro

A critical instrument in managerial selection for the past 25 years has been the assessment centre (AC). One of the major reasons for its success is that it has relatively good…

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Abstract

A critical instrument in managerial selection for the past 25 years has been the assessment centre (AC). One of the major reasons for its success is that it has relatively good predictive validity. However, ACs are not without problems. Despite their relatively good predictive validity, research has been unable to show adequately their content validity, and construct validity has not been demonstrated. It is for this reason that the need for and analysis of the development assessment centre (DAC) is being presented. A DAC needs to be seen as the start point ‐ not end point ‐ of development. However, the evolution of the ACs towards DACs remains too new to generalize on their impact on job performance although some related research is promising. This article examines AC characteristics and AC criteria such as: effectiveness requirements; validity; cost effectiveness and outcomes (descriptive or prescriptive). The gap between the AC and the DAC is examined in terms of design applications. DACs by having the combination of a clear and precise feedback and a pragmatic on‐the‐job follow‐up of what was learned in the simulations, can be a powerful instrument in enhancing the competencies of a business organization and its employees in terms of reliable and accelerated development within a dynamic and turbulent environment.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2014

Thomas Köllen

Every employee embodies manifestations of every demographic that attach to him or her different minority and majority statuses at the same time. As these statuses are often…

Abstract

Every employee embodies manifestations of every demographic that attach to him or her different minority and majority statuses at the same time. As these statuses are often related to organizational hierarchies, employees frequently hold positions of dominance and subordination at the same time. Thus, a given individual’s coping strategies (or coping behavior) in terms of minority stress due to organizational processes of hierarchization, marginalization, and discrimination, are very often a simultaneous coping in terms of more than one demographic. Research on minority stress mostly focuses on single demographics representing only single facets of workforce diversity. By integrating the demographics of age, disability status, nationality, ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, and religion into one framework, the intersectional model proposed in this chapter broadens the perspective on minorities and related minority stress in the workplace. It is shown that coping with minority stress because of one demographic must always be interpreted in relation to the other demographics. The manifestation of one demographic can limit or broaden one’s coping resources for coping with minority stress because of another dimension. Thus, the manifestation of one demographic can determine the coping opportunities and coping behavior one applies to situations because of the minority status of another demographic. This coping behavior can include disclosure decisions about invisible demographics. Therefore, organizational interventions aiming to create a supportive workplace environment and equal opportunities for every employee (e.g., diversity management approaches) should include more demographics instead of focusing only on few.

Details

The Role of Demographics in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-646-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 January 2018

Marina Umaschi Bers, Amanda Strawhacker and Miki Vizner

With the advent of the maker movement, there has been a new push to explore how spaces of learning ought to be designed. The purpose of this paper is to integrate three approaches…

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Abstract

Purpose

With the advent of the maker movement, there has been a new push to explore how spaces of learning ought to be designed. The purpose of this paper is to integrate three approaches for thinking about the role of design of the learning environment: the makerspace movement, Reggio Emilia’s Third Teacher approach, and the positive technological development (PTD) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes two case studies that involved the design of two different early childhood makerspaces (ECMSs) through a co-participatory design experience: the Kindergarten Creator Space at the International School of Billund in Denmark; and the ECMS at (removed for blind review), a resource library in Medford, MA.

Findings

Based on the foundational education framework of PTD, and ideas from the field of interior design, this paper describes the design principles of several successful makerspaces, and case examples of children who use them.

Originality/value

By grounding the theoretical discussion in three approaches, the authors aim to suggest design elements of physical spaces in schools and libraries that can promote young children’s learning through making. Recommendations are discussed for practitioners and researchers interested in ECMSs.

Content available

Abstract

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 122 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Abstract

Details

Youth Development in South Africa: Harnessing the Demographic Dividend
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-409-8

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-879-7

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Medard Kofi Adu, Ejemai Eboreime, Adegboyega Oyekunbi Sapara, Andrew James Greenshaw, Pierre Chue and Vincent Israel Opoku Agyapong

This paper aims to explore the relevant literature available regarding the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as a mode of treatment for…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relevant literature available regarding the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as a mode of treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); to evaluate the evidence to support the use of rTMS as a treatment option for OCD.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors electronically conducted data search in five research databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Psych INFO, SCOPUS and EMBASE) using all identified keywords and index terms across all the databases to identify empirical studies and randomized controlled trials. The authors included articles published with randomized control designs, which aimed at the treatment of OCD with rTMS. Only full-text published articles written in English were reviewed. Review articles on treatment for conditions other than OCD were excluded. The Covidence software was used to manage and streamline the review.

Findings

Despite the inconsistencies in the published literature, the application of rTMS over the supplementary motor area and the orbitofrontal cortex has proven to be promising in efficacy and tolerability compared with other target regions such as the prefrontal cortex for the treatment of OCD. Despite the diversity in terms of the outcomes and clinical variability of the studies under review, rTMS appears to be a promising treatment intervention for OCD.

Research limitations/implications

The authors of this scoping review acknowledge several limitations. First, the search strategy considered only studies published in English and the results are up to date as the last day of the electronic data search of December 10, 2020. Though every effort was made to identify all relevant studies for the purposes of this review per the eligibility criteria, the authors still may have missed some relevant studies, especially those published in other languages.

Originality/value

This review brought to bare the varying literature on the application of rTMS and what is considered gaps in the knowledge in this area in an attempt to evaluate and provide information on the potential therapeutic effects of rTMS for OCD.

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Sinikka Vanhala and Eleni Stavrou

The purpose of the paper is to explore HRM practices and HRM-performance (HRM-P) link in public and private sector organizations across three societal clusters: the Anglo, the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore HRM practices and HRM-performance (HRM-P) link in public and private sector organizations across three societal clusters: the Anglo, the Germanic, and the Nordic European.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on international Cranet HRM survey data collected from large private and public organizations.

Findings

According to results, HRM is more advanced in private companies than in public sector organizations, even across three societal clusters. Instead, the analyses related to HRM-P link in private and public organizations refer to interesting similarities but also differences between organizational sectors (public versus private) and societal clusters.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is retaining in those performance indicators that are applicable in both private and public organizations: subjective measures of productivity and service quality, only. Performance measures relevant especially in the public sector (e.g. qualitative targets, attaining budget frames) were not available, and the operationalization of HRM as an index covering the main areas of HRM may have reduced differences between public and private organizations. More in-depth research designs are needed in public sector HRM-P research.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to HRM-P research by showing that the level of HRM and the HRM-P relationship varies to some extent according to sector and across Western societal clusters.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2018

Jau Yang Liu, William Shiue, Fu Hsiang Chen and Ai Ting Huang

Corporate social responsibility has gradually become an essential enterprise responsibility under stakeholders’ expectations. Employee care strategies involve both qualitative and…

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Abstract

Purpose

Corporate social responsibility has gradually become an essential enterprise responsibility under stakeholders’ expectations. Employee care strategies involve both qualitative and quantitative factors and are receiving special attention with the advent of the information age. In previous studies, a company’s policy of employee care may not fit with the needs of the employees. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to investigate enterprises’ employee care from the employee’s perspective by adopting a hybrid multiple attribute decision making (MADM) model.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on 159 interviews with senior employees and/or department managers using a survey questionnaire. This study uses the MADM model to conduct the analysis. First, this research study used Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) to construct an influential network relations map of the 4 dimensions and 13 criteria of employee care. Second, this study uses DEMATEL-based Analytic Network Process to conduct a weight analysis for each dimension and criterion. Third, this study uses VIKOR to calculate employees’ level of satisfaction as well as the gap from the “aspired level.”

Findings

The results of the study revealed the critical factors influencing employee care and proposed a systematic plan to be used as a reference for improvement. The improvement sequence revealed the following order: Equal employment opportunities→Good industrial relations and benefits→Responsibility to train and educate employees→Occupational health and safety. The empirical results showed there was still 35 percent room for improvement in the enterprises’ implementation policy of employee care.

Originality/value

The implementation of employee care has become an important issue for corporations since it helps to sustain and to increase an enterprise’s competitiveness in the business environment. However, the extant literature on employee care comes from enterprises’ perspectives instead of from employees’ perspectives. This research investigates the key factors of employee care and successfully shows MADM to be an effective model for the planning and implementation of corporate social responsibilities’ employee care from the perspective of employees.

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Caro Williams-Pierce

The purpose of this paper is to explore three different types of digital environments for mathematics learning that may support mathematical play and the failure and feedback…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore three different types of digital environments for mathematics learning that may support mathematical play and the failure and feedback mechanics present in each.

Design/methodology/approach

Interaction analysis and the lenses of failure, feedback and mathematical play are used to analyze the mathematical interactions afforded by three different digital environments.

Findings

Each digital environment supports or restrains the potential for mathematical play through mathematical representations, failure and feedback.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of this paper is to highlight different ways in which digital failure and feedback designs can influence the emergent experience of mathematical play.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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