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Abstract

Details

Videogames, Libraries, and the Feedback Loop: Learning Beyond the Stacks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-505-9

Abstract

Details

Videogames, Libraries, and the Feedback Loop: Learning Beyond the Stacks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-505-9

Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2011

Mike Molesworth, Rebecca Jenkins and Sue Eccles

Purpose – In this chapter we consider how two apparently disconnected practices – one very human (loving relationships), another the apparently alienating outcome of…

Abstract

Purpose – In this chapter we consider how two apparently disconnected practices – one very human (loving relationships), another the apparently alienating outcome of consumer technology (videogame play) – may turn out to be linked in very intimate and perhaps surprising ways. In making this connection we hope to comment on how consumer practices may be understood in the context of dynamic human relationships and cultural ideals.

Methodology – We conducted 36 phenomenological interviews with adult videogame players in order to elicit everyday experiences of videogame play in the context of the individual's lifeworld. This chapter deals with aspects of data that explore relationships with partners and children.

Findings – We illustrate that consumer practices, ideals, and even couples are not stable things, but are subject to routine reconfiguration throughout life. We suggest the possibility of a triadic theory of human relationships that consists of the people themselves, their consumer practices, and ideas about what love means.

Originality/value of paper – Previous questions about the value of videogame consumption have tended to ask about violence or the normalcy of how we might spend our time. In this chapter we have attempted to shift the focus to questions about human relationships and how they might be enacted with consumer technologies. By understanding the interactions between human actors, their consumer practices and their ideals we are able to comment on existing critiques and celebrations of the impact of consumer culture on human relationships.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-116-9

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Videogames, Libraries, and the Feedback Loop: Learning Beyond the Stacks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-505-9

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Ali Hussain, Amir Zaib Abbasi, Linda D. Hollebeek, Carsten D. Schultz, Ding Hooi Ting and Bradley Wilson

Though the videogame literature is thriving, little remains known regarding the effectiveness of pop-up ads that appear in videogames. Addressing this gap, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Though the videogame literature is thriving, little remains known regarding the effectiveness of pop-up ads that appear in videogames. Addressing this gap, this study, therefore, aims to explore pop-up ads as an important tool to prompt gamer-perceived advertisement value and their subsequent intent to install the advertised videogame.

Design/methodology/approach

To frame the analyses, the authors adopt and extend Ducoffe’s advertising value model by incorporating the visual/audio aesthetic videogame components that are largely overlooked in prior research. Using a self-administered survey, data were collected from 321 online gamers. The authors tested the model by using partial-least-squares-based structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results indicate that pop-up ad-related incentives, entertainment, credibility, personalization, audio aesthetics and irritation significantly affect user-perceived ad value. In turn, perceived ad value was found to affect players’ intent to install the advertised videogame.

Research limitations/implications

Though the findings corroborate the importance of pop-up ads being perceived as informative and/or entertaining, they also emphasize the value of personalized ads, ad-related incentives and audio aesthetic, which impact gamers’ intent to install the advertised videogame.

Practical implications

This study advances managerial understanding of videogame-based services, which is expected to be particularly useful for freemium-based videogame marketers and developers.

Originality/value

By extending Ducoffe’s model of advertising value, the authors apply the proposed framework in the online videogaming-based pop-up ad context, and explore the effect of user-perceived pop-up ad value on their intent to install the advertised videogame.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Amir Zaib Abbasi, Muhammad Asif, Linda D. Hollebeek, Jamid Ul Islam, Ding Hooi Ting and Umair Rehman

This study aims to propose a model for predicting consumers’ esports videogame engagement on their ensuing consumption behaviors, which remains nebulous to date.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose a model for predicting consumers’ esports videogame engagement on their ensuing consumption behaviors, which remains nebulous to date.

Design/methodology/approach

After approaching esports consumers in different gaming zones in Pakistan, this paper collected data from 364 videogame-based esports consumers. This paper deployed SmartPLS 3.2.8 software to perform the partial least squares-structural equation modeling-based analyzes.

Findings

The structural model results show that consumers’ affective and behavioral esports videogame engagement positively affects their consumption behavior, including heightened community engagement, purchase intent, coproduction, word-of-mouth and new player recruitment. However, while consumers’ cognitive esports engagement was found to positively impact community engagement, new player recruitment and coproduction, it failed to predict consumers’ esports-related purchase intent or word-of-mouth behaviors.

Practical implications

The findings reveal that a strategic focus on consumers’ esports game engagement will enable practitioners to nurture desirable consumer behaviors, including enhanced purchase intent, coproduction, word-of-mouth and new player recruitment behaviors, thus warranting consumer engagement’s strategic value as a key esports gaming metric.

Originality/value

Empirical research into the role of consumers’ esports videogame engagement on their ensuing consumption behaviors remains scant to date. Based on this gap, this study offers a timely contribution by exploring and validating a model that gauges the effect of consumers’ cognitive, emotional and behavioral esports videogame engagement on their community engagement, purchase intention, coproduction, word-of-mouth and new player recruitment. It, thus, offers important insight into the rapidly advancing field of digital esports games.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Amber Nicole Pfannenstiel

The purpose of this paper is to discuss an assignment using videogames to demonstrate theories from in-class readings. Game-like learning principles (Gee, 2007)…

679

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss an assignment using videogames to demonstrate theories from in-class readings. Game-like learning principles (Gee, 2007), collaborative learning in games (Echeverria et al., 2011) and gamification (Sheldon, 2012) are just a few examples of the discussion areas in videogames and education research. But as Rice (2014) finds, there are few available lesson-plans and examples of everyday classroom use of popular videogames.

Design/methodology/approach

In response to this need, this paper discusses classroom use of free popular videogames as cultural artifact examples for course content discussions in a Videogames and Literacies Junior Writing Course offered within an English department.

Findings

This paper describes the assignment and learning goals, specifically discussing the first iteration and subsequent changes made to aid students in their presentations and learning. Included in this paper are discussions of technology affordances within the classroom space, student reactions and student successes and failures with games. This assignment asks students to find a videogame example to use as demonstrations of the course material as they lead class discussion.

Originality/value

Asking students to use videogames and game play to engage course content also engages students in higher-order cognitive thinking about play and game mechanics, helps students analyze course material and develops presentation skills using videogames to discuss course material. In examining videogames as more than just entertainment, students see games as learning tools with ways of teaching culture, teaching learning and testing learning.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Ian Bogost

Proposes to look at how many designers and researchers have become interested in how videogames can serve as forms of cultural expression beyond entertainment alone.

2586

Abstract

Purpose

Proposes to look at how many designers and researchers have become interested in how videogames can serve as forms of cultural expression beyond entertainment alone.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on views from the videogame industry and the educational system.

Findings

This article suggests that both the videogame industry and the compulsory educational system are engaged in commensurate crises. The videogame industry is creatively rich but risk‐averse, motivated primarily by wealth and reinforced by its own success. The education establishment is bureaucratic and self‐effacing, endorsing the production of complacency over challenge. With videogames and education caught in similar ruts, to support change in one means endorsing a revolution in the other.

Originality/value

Compares the videogame industry with the educational establishment and suggests ways in which the videogame industry can assist education.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Dwane H. Dean

Videogame play is more popular among young males compared with young females. The present study aims to investigate spatial visualization ability as an explanation for…

Abstract

Purpose

Videogame play is more popular among young males compared with young females. The present study aims to investigate spatial visualization ability as an explanation for this gender gap. The premise is based on a well‐documented gender difference in spatial ability favoring males and assumes that spatial ability would be an advantage in playing videogames. Also, reports in the literature indicate improvement in spatial ability following videogame play, suggesting that play may specifically task spatial ability.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 114 university students aged 18 to 24 answered questions on attitudes and videogame behavior and completed a psychometric test of spatial visualization ability.

Findings

Regression analysis indicated that interest in videogame play is significantly predicted by gender, interest in science fiction, and number of semesters of foreign language completed (with the latter having a negative influence). Mediation analysis suggested that neither of the latter two variables mediates the gender effect. Although spatial visualization ability was significantly correlated with videogame interest, this was found to be a spurious (non‐causal) association, due to both variables being influenced by gender.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the narrow age range of subjects (18‐24) and the focus of the study on spatial visualization ability and a limited number of other variables.

Originality/value

The finding that semesters of foreign language completed and interest in science fiction significantly predict videogame interest is apparently novel. The former variable may be a proxy for preference for verbal (semantic) information processing over visual information processing, and this may explain the significant negative correlation between semesters of foreign language completed and videogame interest.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

L. Scatteia

The aim of this paper is to describe the potential of the videogame as a mass communication medium and to propose a videogame‐based public outreach strategy for education…

1257

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe the potential of the videogame as a mass communication medium and to propose a videogame‐based public outreach strategy for education and inspiration to space science and space activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective was achieved by means of a semiotic approach to the medium under discussion. The subject scope of the paper was further developed and supported by an overview of existing case studies related to the topic. Based on the aforementioned analysis and on original ideas, new concepts and strategies on the subject are proposed.

Findings

The videogame medium has excellent potential for promotion, marketing and educational applications. Moreover, spin‐off applications in the field of simulation‐based research can also be envisioned. The proposed concepts, although specifically referring to the space sector, are applicable to many other industrial and non‐industrial fields, including libraries.

Practical implications

The paper hints at many possible spin‐off applications for videogames in the field of communication, marketing and simulation‐based research.

Originality/value

The concepts proposed in the paper outline novel marketing and outreach strategies (together with other spin‐off applications) based on a rather underestimated medium, i.e. the videogame, which has yet to receive proper attention from scholars.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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