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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2022

Lauren Hunter, Sarah Gerritsen and Victoria Egli

This literature scoping review aims to investigate if, how and why eating behaviours change after a crisis event such as a natural disaster, financial crisis or pandemic in…

Abstract

Purpose

This literature scoping review aims to investigate if, how and why eating behaviours change after a crisis event such as a natural disaster, financial crisis or pandemic in high-income countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting “lockdowns” and social distancing measures have changed access to food, the types of food consumed and usual eating behaviours. Early research on the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic is compared with existing literature on other high-impact crises in high-income countries around the world, such as Hurricane Katrina and the Global Financial Crisis. A search of four electronic databases in August 2020 of literature from 2000 to 2020 yielded 50 relevant publications that were included in the qualitative thematic analysis.

Findings

The analysis found that crisis events made accessing food more difficult and led to increased food insecurity. Home cooking, sharing food and eating together (within households during the pandemic) all increased during and after a crisis. Resources often reduced and needed to be pooled. Crises had a multi-directional impact on dietary patterns, and the motivators for dietary pattern change differ between populations and crises.

Originality/value

In conclusion, eating behaviours impacted by crises because of the disruption of food systems, increased food insecurity and changes in daily routines. Community networks were a strong protective factor against adverse outcomes from food insecurity.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Penelope Carroll, Karen Witten, Melody Smith, Victoria Egli, Suzanne Mavoa and Marketta Kytta

The overarching aim of our research is the social and environmental sustainability of cities, with a focus on ensuring the rights and needs of the children who live in them are…

Abstract

The overarching aim of our research is the social and environmental sustainability of cities, with a focus on ensuring the rights and needs of the children who live in them are considered in policy and planning arenas. How do we, as researchers, work ethically and effectively with children to foreground their voices and produce robust evidence to inform policies and processes which promote their wellbeing in child-friendly cities, and in line with Sustainable Development Goals? Children have the right to be heard, and their views taken seriously, in policy and planning arenas. Conducting ethical and effective child-centred research requires balancing considerations of children’s rights to genuine participation and their rights to protection at all stages of the research process. This balance requires methodological flexibility and a situated ethical approach, where researchers and participants together determine appropriate research pathways. In this chapter, the authors reflect on ethical and methodological insights gained during a decade of conducting urban-related research with children. The various projects used different methods and provided different lessons; but common to all was an understanding of the importance of relationship-building, of supportive and engaged adults, and of methods which were respectful, age/culturally appropriate and ‘fit for purpose’. These factors are crucial to ethically enable the foregrounding of children’s voices, the collection of robust data and effective dissemination of research with children.

Details

Ethics and Integrity in Research with Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-401-1

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Abstract

Details

Ethics and Integrity in Research with Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-401-1

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1907

“GIVE a dog a bad name and hang him,” is an aphorism which has been accepted for many years. But, like many other household words, it is not always true. Even if it were, the dog…

Abstract

“GIVE a dog a bad name and hang him,” is an aphorism which has been accepted for many years. But, like many other household words, it is not always true. Even if it were, the dog to be operated upon would probably prefer a gala day at his Tyburn Tree to being executed in an obscure back yard.

Details

New Library World, vol. 9 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Roha W. Khalaf

The purpose of this paper is to describe the component attributes of an Arabian city, caught between tradition and modernization, with focus on their reactions to climate and…

1148

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the component attributes of an Arabian city, caught between tradition and modernization, with focus on their reactions to climate and religion.

Design/methodology/approach

A platform of comparison between Old Kuwait Town and Kuwait City is provided while showing the effects of oil money on the city's urban morphology. The paper's first section describes the emergence of the Islamic city in the Arabian (Persian) Gulf and identifies key concepts in city morphology. An Islamic School of Law, furthermore, is selected to explain who interprets religious text and how concepts in Islam, such as domestic privacy, are translated into design guidelines, which have influenced the Kuwaiti vernacular typology and street pattern. The transition is made to the second section, which compares Old Kuwait Town and Kuwait City based on knowledge gained in the preceding section. Finally, the third section of the paper recommends some architectural and planning specifications.

Findings

It is found that climate and religion have lost their authority at the expense of a paradigm shift in the 1950s.

Research limitations/implications

The paper focuses on, and is limited to, one case study.

Practical implications

A few architectural and planning specifications are recommended for application in practice to improve contemporary design and to promote a unified morphological outcome in Kuwait City.

Social implications

The message is to show readers that progress is about working with, and responding to, local determinants rather than applying Western thinking.

Originality/value

The author advocates a look at precedents, because learning from the past helps to design buildings and plan cities that are compatible with local environments and traditions.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Marco Bertelli, Luis Salvador‐Carulla, Stefano Lassi, Michele Zappella, Raymond Ceccotto, David Palterer, Johan de Groef, Laura Benni and Paolo Rossi Prodi

Recent international experiences of community inclusion have produced a major change in residential care for people with intellectual disability (ID). Assignment and outcome…

1692

Abstract

Purpose

Recent international experiences of community inclusion have produced a major change in residential care for people with intellectual disability (ID). Assignment and outcome assessment through new person‐centred measures are raising increasing interest; however, the information on quality of life and accommodation is still limited. This paper aims to provide an overview of the application of quality of life models and the size of the provision of different living arrangements.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic mapping of the literature of the last decade was followed by an expert guided review of the available evidence.

Findings

QoL outcomes measures of living arrangements in people with ID show conceptual and methodological challenges. The following key topics were identified: individual level: issues related to health status, behavioural problems and other personal factors (ageing, choice and empowerment); family and peers; local level: accommodation, architecture and urbanization, and economic aspects (deprivation and costs); macro level: social participation (community inclusion). The residential solutions that are currently considered of highest efficiency are small apartments in the community and “cluster centers”.

Originality/value

The level of quality of life is very relevant in the assessment of living arrangements in people with ID although its assessment still shows significant limitations. Some accommodation typologies seem more effective than others. New conceptual models of inclusive residential care support the convenience of a wide range of accommodation alternatives that may fit the individual needs of a highly heterogeneous population group. A unique residential alternative, albeit optimal from a community care perspective, may not be adequate for all persons with ID.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2023

Petra Chaloupkova, Miloslav Petrtyl, Claire Durand, Charoula Konstantia Nikolaou, Guido Mangione and Ladislav Kokoska

This study examined the relationship between adult respondents' COVID-19 risk perception and its impact on changes in eating habits, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined the relationship between adult respondents' COVID-19 risk perception and its impact on changes in eating habits, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and smoking.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional online questionnaire was used to collect data during the first wave of the pandemic, in the European spring and summer of 2020. Kruskal–Wallis and Pearson chi-squared tests were used to determine the associations between the consumers' COVID-19 risk perception and the respondents' country of origin. The respondents were primarily university employees and students from four European countries (the Czech Republic, France, the United Kingdom, and Italy).

Findings

The study showed significant changes in lifestyle behaviours of the respondents during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the pre-outbreak period. Approximately half of all respondents reported a decrease in alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical activity, while eating habits among European consumers showed trends towards both healthier and less healthy dietary patterns. The most significant changes were recorded in reducing alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical activity among almost half of the respondents. Positive COVID-19 test experience, age, and country of the respondents had a negative influence, whereas healthy food consumption and alcohol consumption had a positive influence on the COVID-19 related risk perception.

Originality/value

The fear of the COVID-19 outbreak together with the restrictions imposed by national governments in response to the pandemic fundamentally affected the respondents' lifestyles. Understanding these changes can help establish interventions to alleviate the adoption of negative lifestyles and attitudes in subsequent waves of the COVID-19 pandemic or other similar situations.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 125 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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