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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Jim Stewart and Vanessa Knowles

Draws on previous research undertaken by the authors which examined the notion of graduate careers from the perspective of three stakeholders, namely students, higher education…

4750

Abstract

Draws on previous research undertaken by the authors which examined the notion of graduate careers from the perspective of three stakeholders, namely students, higher education institutions and small businesses. Central to the research was the notion of transferable skills and qualities which provided a shared interest for all three stakeholders. Presents two models which suggest a role for HE in facilitating students’ career management. Provides some examples which illustrate how the models may be applied within HE institutions.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 25 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Jim Stewart and Vanessa Knowles

This paper provides an overview of the role and contribution of mentoring in the context of a degree programme in which students spend their second and third years in‐company. As…

2007

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the role and contribution of mentoring in the context of a degree programme in which students spend their second and third years in‐company. As well as describing the process within the context of the degree, the paper examines the particular mentoring design features. Of specific interest is the shared mentoring role of academic members of staff and in‐company managers, and the variety of roles adopted by each of them, including coacher, facilitator, networker, counsellor. In addition, the mentors share a role in assessing students’ work in relation to their skills development, focusing on transferable skills, namely: communication, teamworking, adaptability and leadership. This paper draws upon findings of primary research conducted with the mentoring teams that exist within the wide range of consortium companies that sponsor the second and third years of the degree programme and Nottingham Business School. The paper reports the perceived benefits of such a mentoring process for academic and practitioners working in partnership to support and enhance the students’ learning experience.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 27 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Jim Stewart and Vanessa Knowles

This final article in a series of three provides an interpretation of the research findings reported in the second article against the conceptual models described in the first…

10792

Abstract

This final article in a series of three provides an interpretation of the research findings reported in the second article against the conceptual models described in the first. This provides support for the view that HEIs have a role in developing both “self‐awareness” and “opportunity awareness” within undergraduates to support their ability to demonstrate employability in a changing labour market. As part of this, a focus on providing opportunities to develop transferable skills through the curriculum of degree programmes is argued to be appropriate and some examples are given. Suggested actions for students and SMEs, as well as HEIs, are included to respond to the changing nature of graduate careers. Areas of further research are identified, and a conceptual model to inform such research is offered.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

265

Abstract

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 28 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Jim Stewart and Vanessa Knowles

Reports the results of empirical research into the graduate recruitment and selection practices adopted by SMEs, and the skills being sought by employers in that sector. Describes…

21460

Abstract

Reports the results of empirical research into the graduate recruitment and selection practices adopted by SMEs, and the skills being sought by employers in that sector. Describes in detail the research methods, which included interviews with large organisations to determine, alongside existing research, the extent of characteristics of SME graduate recruitment which might be particular to that sector. Findings and interpretations suggest that, in common with large organisations, SMEs value what are now termed transferable skills, although there are some differences of emphasis between the two sectors. There appears to be greater difference in the selection methods employed, though this is not as great or significant as might be expected or predicted. An important difference between the two sectors suggested by the research is the expectations placed on graduate recruits by employers in the two sectors. Unlike large employers which are more likely to provide graduate development programmes, SMEs expect an immediate contribution from graduate recruits. The implications of these similarities and differences will be explored in the final article of this series.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Jim Stewart and Vanessa Knowles

The first of a series of three articles examining the role of higher education in preparing graduates for “self‐managing” their careers, with particular reference to small to…

7561

Abstract

The first of a series of three articles examining the role of higher education in preparing graduates for “self‐managing” their careers, with particular reference to small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) as potential employers. Examines key trends in the graduate labour market, including the increasing numbers entering higher education (HE) and the possible consequences for graduate careers. Explores actual and potential responses by HE institutions and related implications for the curriculum of undergraduate programmes. Provides a brief review of career theory. This leads to presentation of a conceptual model to inform the notion of “self‐managed careers”, and examines associated knowledge and skills required for application of the model in practice. Prepares the ground for reporting the results of empirical research in the second article in the series.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Sally Sambrook and Jim Stewart

This paper aims to explore the challenges and opportunities for expediting critical reflection in management education and development to highlight particularly how critical…

1650

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the challenges and opportunities for expediting critical reflection in management education and development to highlight particularly how critical reflection has been facilitated within the context of a professionally focused doctoral programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on empirical research conducted for a broader project, focusing here on two awaydays for DBA supervisors (n=25 in 2005 and n=16 in 2006) and a UFHRD workshop in 2007 (n=12) for members involved and/or interested in doctoral programmes in HRD, where the empirical research findings were presented and discussed. The paper presents selected findings from the perspective of staff through their own critical reflections, drawing on the data from the two awaydays and the UFHRD workshop. Detailed handwritten notes were taken and transcribed, in addition to flipchart material provided by the participants. These qualitative data are analysed using thematic analysis. The quotations presented are as accurate as possible (verbatim) and any ambiguous notes have been deliberately excluded.

Findings

Emerging findings include the need to clarify the concept for both staff and students, and embed critical reflection from the beginning of the programme and throughout written assignments. Insights into how staff perceive critical reflection within a DBA programme are offered, including how staff might assume (incorrectly) that advanced practitioners arrive with a high level of maturity to engage in critical reflection, and yet advanced practitioners “worry” about critique and perceive it as negative and/or failure.

Research limitations/implications

It is acknowledged that the subjective experience of student participants is not central to this discussion, and, whilst a limitation of this paper, this presents an avenue for further research.

Practical implications

The paper presents a critical and reflexive account from a facilitator's perspective and offers practical suggestions for incorporating critical reflection within a DBA programme.

Originality/value

Given the dearth of literature of facilitating critical reflection in the context of professionally focused doctoral programmes, this paper makes a small and initial contribution to this field.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Jim Stewart, Anne Keegan and Pam Stevens

This paper aims to explore how teaching and assessing reflective learning skills can support postgraduate practitioners studying organisational change and explores the challenges…

2573

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how teaching and assessing reflective learning skills can support postgraduate practitioners studying organisational change and explores the challenges for tutors in assessing these journals.

Design/methodology/approach

Assessment criteria were developed from the literature on reflective practice and organisational power and politics and mapped against the content of the journals to understand how and why students had benefited from keeping the journals. The extent to which they had engaged in “deep” learning was also assessed.

Findings

Tensions arose between giving students sufficient scope and designing appropriate assessment guidelines. Students submitted a wide variety and quality of journals; everything from a DVD, to a diary to a “standard” essay. Reflective journals were found to be an effective tool for students who are practitioners involved in organisational change through their capacity to promote deep rather than surface learning. An unintended outcome of the study was the recognition that reflective practice in postgraduate education supports the skills required to develop the “thinking performer”.

Research limitations/implications

The study was small scale, and not retested.

Practical implications

The study has reinforced the significance of the link between thinking (critical reflection) and performing (workplace application), within organisational change. It has also demonstrated that non‐traditional forms of assessment have greater capacity to promote deep learning than do conventional essays, especially where students are not HR specialists yet are tasked with leading complex organisational change projects. Therefore the use of reflective journals could be extended to other postgraduate programmes with skill requirements in organisational change and management.

Originality/value

While there is now a growing body of literature on reflective practice, few studies exist which examine how learning journals are assessed, particularly for line managers. The analysis has encouraged further research into the development of critical reflection, the use and benefits of learning journals and more specifically, how educators can develop sufficiently robust assessment criteria for such journals.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Katarzyna Piwowar-Sulej, Izablela Kwil and Krzysztof Podsiadły

The basic role in the development of the national economy of each country plays their citizens – their entrepreneurs. Preparation of the society for entrepreneurial activities

Abstract

The basic role in the development of the national economy of each country plays their citizens – their entrepreneurs. Preparation of the society for entrepreneurial activities takes place during the education process. In the Polish National Development Program for years 2007–2013 the development of entrepreneurial competencies was prioritised to increase the competitiveness of the economy.

In this chapter a set of features referred to as entrepreneurial competencies was developed. They were divided into four groups, that is, technical, social, economic and managerial. In addition, the literature on entrepreneurship education was reviewed. The empirical part presents the results of own analysis on the methods for developing entrepreneurial competencies which are preferred by students and widely used at Polish universities in four fields of study: humanities, technical, natural and economic studies.

The research results show that the humanities rather do not attach significance to the analysed competencies. Studies in economics include them, but their educational programmes focus primarily on shaping a group of technical competencies. The method most often indicated by all groups of respondents as effective in developing individual entrepreneurial competencies was discussion. The project method came in second, and coaching in third place. Meanwhile, the lecture method still dominates in the educational practice in all fields of study.

This chapter presents the results of the original research project, which are guidelines for all responsible for shaping study programmes and deciding about the educational methods.

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2018

Mengwei Tu

Abstract

Details

Education, Migration and Family Relations between China and the UK: The Transnational One-Child Generation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-673-0

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