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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2023

Kristy A. Brugar

The purpose of this study is to explore decision-making of elementary teachers (n = 5) specific to US/American history content and curricular resources. More specifically for this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore decision-making of elementary teachers (n = 5) specific to US/American history content and curricular resources. More specifically for this study, the author asks the following broad research question: When presented with a collection of social studies instructional resources, how do elementary teachers describe the choices they do make/may make?

Design/methodology/approach

In this comparative case study, fifth-grade teachers were interviewed using verbal protocol methodology, they discussed their curriculum, teaching and instructional decisions as each was presented with history/social studies resources associated with newly adopted state standards.

Findings

Findings indicate these elementary teachers have professional freedom to make instructional decisions in the ways they interpreted the standards, design instruction and select materials for social studies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to and extends the research in elementary social studies. Teachers' voices and decisions are presented as intellectual and pedagogical actions associated with teaching elementary school social studies.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Tina Reynolds

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the extent to which the impact of the information unit (IU) is felt within the parent organisation.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the extent to which the impact of the information unit (IU) is felt within the parent organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for mixed methods approach combining two survey methods: a quantitative questionnaire with a follow‐up set of qualitative interviews.

Findings

The IU was felt to have an impact; however, the definition of impact was very difficult to pin down. There is a need to promote the work of the IU.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may not be replicable. Additionally, there is a risk of researcher bias.

Practical implications

The paper could be used to help study impact in other special libraries.

Originality/value

This paper seems to be unique in studying the impact of a corporate library using this approach. It will be of use to other corporate librarians and possibly those looking at mixed methods.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Steve Thornton

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Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Dee Magnoni

296

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Tina P. Franks, Tina Budzise-Weaver and Leslie J. Reynolds

The purpose of this paper is to offer insights into the hiring process for candidates seeking entry-level and mid-range librarian positions at ARL public university libraries…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer insights into the hiring process for candidates seeking entry-level and mid-range librarian positions at ARL public university libraries. Whether a recent librarian graduate, a seasoned librarian seeking a different academic institution or a librarian transitioning into academia from a different library environment, an understanding of how search committees function and the importance they contribute to identifying the best candidate can be beneficial to any job seeker.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers universal best practices, techniques and “keys” to unlocking the secrets of the recruitment process from the candidate’s perspective to help librarians seeking employment in an Association of Research Libraries (ARLs) public university environment. The scope of this paper is for entry level and mid-range librarians, but some ARL’s do use executive search firms for upper level administrative positions.

Findings

This paper describes the search process, offers insiders’ perspectives and provides techniques along with best practices on how to be a successful applicant and candidate.

Practical implications

As experienced professionals who have served on search committees, this paper explains the “keys” to best practices and how to enhance one’s resume and curriculum vita.

Originality/value

This paper walks potential job candidates through the process of how to apply and what to expect during an ARL Library Search Committee application review.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 October 2022

Chien Wen (Tina) Yuan and Nanyi Bi

In a world where different communication technologies support social connection, managing unavailability is as important as, if not more important than, managing availability. The…

Abstract

Purpose

In a world where different communication technologies support social connection, managing unavailability is as important as, if not more important than, managing availability. The need to manage unavailability becomes increasingly critical when users employ several communication tools to interact with various ties. A person's availability information disclosure may depend on different social relationships and the technologies used by the person. The study contributes to the literature by drawing on privacy management theory to investigate how users practice availability management and use its deceptive form, which is sometimes called a butler lie, with various ties across different messaging applications (apps) as part of their online privacy. Relevant factors in mediated communication, including facework, common ground, and interpersonal trust, are included in the developed model.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an online survey (n = 475) to explore the relationship between one's contact with different interactants (significant others, family members, close friends, acquaintances, groups of friends, and groups of acquaintances) and one's practice of availability management and use of butler lies with these interactants at different size levels on various messaging apps.

Findings

Factors such as facework, privacy related to technology, and privacy related to social relationships affect the practice of availability management and the use of butler lies. Notably, butler lies are used most frequently with acquaintances and groups of acquaintances and least frequently with significant others. Moreover, the practice of availability management and the use of butler lies are negatively moderated by people's conversational grounding and trust.

Originality/value

The study examined the practice of cross-app availability management with diverse social ties on mobile technologies, which is a socio-informatic practice that is widely adopted in the contemporary digital landscape but on which limited scientific and theoretic research has been conducted. No research has directly investigated users' availability management across multiple apps from a relational perspective. Building on the theoretical framework of privacy management, the paper aims to bridge the gap in the relevant literature. The results of this study can serve as a reference for library professionals to develop information literacy programs according to users' availability management needs. The results also provide insights to system designers for developing messaging tools.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2024

Pui Kuan Tina Fan, Ja Young (Jacey) Choe and Yeseul Na

This study explores the linkages between various attributes, consequences and values of casino restaurants and the differences in the hierarchical value maps between female and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the linkages between various attributes, consequences and values of casino restaurants and the differences in the hierarchical value maps between female and male customers and between casino players and non-casino players.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted using the means-end chain (MEC) theory. The data were collected using the hard-laddering method. Two hundred forty-one responses were analyzed.

Findings

Attributes such as “taste,” “reasonable prices,” and “discounts” were associated with the values “personal happiness,” “considered,” “life satisfaction,” and “life-quality enhancement” at casino restaurants. Males were found to hold “prompt services” as important when dining at casino restaurants, while females held a “spacious environment” to be critical. Furthermore, “use of casino complimentary credits” was important to casino players, while “free parking” and “comfortable seats” mattered for non-casino players.

Practical implications

It is suggested that casinos add more Asian cuisines in their casino restaurants in Macao to attract customers who value culinary and cultural exploration while simultaneously satisfying tourists from neighboring regions who wish to enjoy familiar foods when they visit Macao. In addition, the authors recommend that casinos develop menu items that can be served quickly to casino players.

Originality/value

This study is based on the MEC theory and broadens the range of studies on casino restaurants. Furthermore, it provides useful information to guide casino restauranteurs in developing their marketing and operational strategies for different customer segments.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2023

Karen L. Samuels, Glenda Reynolds and Nick Turner

The dual purpose of this paper is (1) to describe and contextualize encounters between mentors' and mentees' differing needs in a leadership development programme and (2) to posit…

Abstract

Purpose

The dual purpose of this paper is (1) to describe and contextualize encounters between mentors' and mentees' differing needs in a leadership development programme and (2) to posit that practice negotiating frictional encounters constructs “good fit” between mentors and mentees and is a potentially important skill for leadership development.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors gathered data through qualitative, semi-structured interviews of mentors, mentees and mentoring programme staff participating in a mentoring programme for leadership development offered at a mid-sized Canadian business school. Using a grounded theory, interpretive analytical approach, the authors examine the notion of “good fit” and how it emerged in encounters between participants' diverse needs.

Findings

The authors identified participants' mentoring needs by eliciting their experiences of “good fit” in the focal leadership development programme. The findings revealed that encounters between contrasting needs fell into two categories: (1) the need for career advising versus leadership development and (2) the need for structured versus free-flowing conversation. Those encounters, in turn, generated opportunities for leadership development.

Practical implications

The findings have valuable implications for designing mentoring for leadership programmes. Namely, the authors propose pairing individuals with similar deeper-level qualities but diverse educational backgrounds and experiences to allow for practice in negotiating encounters with friction and contrast.

Originality/value

As an empirical study of mentoring for leadership development in practice, this study applies a dialectical approach to encounters across contrasting mentoring needs. In doing so, it locates leadership development potential in those frictional encounters.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2023

Clare Brooks

The prevalence and drawbacks of policy borrowing in teacher education are widely acknowledged. In England, there has been extensive use of research conducted in the United States…

Abstract

The prevalence and drawbacks of policy borrowing in teacher education are widely acknowledged. In England, there has been extensive use of research conducted in the United States as justification for a prescriptive approach to teacher education nationwide. This raises questions about evidence borrowing from different contexts as a key facet of policy making, with inherent concerns about how the contextual influences on that research influence its effectiveness in transitioning to new spaces. Through the use of spatial theory, this chapter examines this phenomenon and highlights how inferences made from research undertaken in one context, but applied in another, can be detrimental to the established practices and expertise of teacher educators.

Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2023

Dessynie Edwards, Tina Garcia, Monica M. Muñoz, Teresa Silva and Juan Manuel Niño

The average woman educator spends more time in the classroom than their male counterpart before ascending to an administrator position. Women educators spends on average 10–11…

Abstract

The average woman educator spends more time in the classroom than their male counterpart before ascending to an administrator position. Women educators spends on average 10–11 years as a teacher and as an administrator before becoming promoted to the superintendent position (Kingsberry & Jean-Marie, 2018; Manuel & Slate, 2003; Robinson, Shakeshaft, Grogan, & Newcomb, 2017). However, when they do reach this position, women superintendents lead in a different manner than men. They tend to focus on the well-being of children and families. They bring a strong interest in educating the child as a whole and place those at high risk a priority (Grogan, 2005). Women are finding way(s) to bring women's way(s) of knowing and expertise into this position. Women tend to keep instruction at the forefront and develop relationships with school and wider community members that can help foster the academic and social growth of the student (Grogan, 2005; Robinson et al., 2017; Wilmore, 2008).

Therefore, feminist@ leaders surface from their feminist and cultural knowledge (Sanchez & Ek, 2013) as a form of traditional resistance. They create pathways for other Latinas on their journey to claim Chicana feminism. As such, this chapter highlights the voices of four valiant women of color leaders on the path toward the superintendency whose personal and professional pathways intersect to create a feminist@ leadership identity.

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