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1 – 10 of 55
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

J. Riguidel and T. Ridler

This paper details the experiences gained by a photoresist manufacturer, an equipment supplier and a PCB manufacturing end user in the conversion of an inner layer production…

468

Abstract

This paper details the experiences gained by a photoresist manufacturer, an equipment supplier and a PCB manufacturing end user in the conversion of an inner layer production facility from dry film to liquid resists. The paper describes the steps necessary to plan the conversion, install equipment, start up production, train personnel and yield improve a liquid resist fine line inner layer process.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Yih‐Chih Chiou, Jian‐Zong Liu and Yu‐Teng Liang

The detection of invisible micro cracks (μ‐cracks) in multi‐crystalline silicon (mc‐si) solar wafers is difficult because of the wafers' heterogeneously textured backgrounds. The…

1551

Abstract

Purpose

The detection of invisible micro cracks (μ‐cracks) in multi‐crystalline silicon (mc‐si) solar wafers is difficult because of the wafers' heterogeneously textured backgrounds. The difficulty is twofold. First, invisible μ‐cracks must be visualized to imaging devices. Second, an image processing sequence capable of extracting μ‐cracks from the captured images must be developed. The purpose of this paper is to reveal invisible μ‐cracks that lie beneath the surface of mc‐si solar wafers.

Design/methodology/approach

To solve the problems, the authors first set up a near infrared (NIR) imaging system to capture images of interior μ‐cracks. After being able to see the invisible μ‐cracks, a region‐growing flaw detection algorithm was then developed to extract μ‐cracks from the captured images.

Findings

The experimental results showed that the proposed μ‐cracks inspection system is effective in detecting μ‐cracks. In addition, the system can also be used for the inspection of silicon solar wafers for stain, pinhole, inclusion and macro cracks. The overall accuracy of the defect detection system is 99.85 percent.

Research limitations/implications

At present, the developed prototype system can detect μ‐crack down to 13.4 μm. The inspection resolution is high but the speed is low. However, the limitation on inspection speed can easily be lifted by choosing a higher resolution NIR camera.

Practical implications

Generally, this paper is a great reference for researchers who are interested in developing automatic optical inspection systems for inspecting solar wafer for invisible μ‐cracks.

Originality/value

The research described in this paper makes a step toward developing an effective while low‐cost approach for revealing invisible μ‐crack of mc‐si solar wafers. The advantages provided by the proposed system include excellent crack detection sensitivity, capability of detecting hidden subsurface μ‐cracks, and low cost.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1961

The dates for the conference of the International Federation for Documentation to be held in London in September 1961 have now been settled finally. They differ slightly from…

Abstract

The dates for the conference of the International Federation for Documentation to be held in London in September 1961 have now been settled finally. They differ slightly from those already notified to members of Aslib, who are now requested to note that the first public session will take place at 2.30 p.m. on Tuesday 12th September. The last public session will take place during the afternoon of Friday 15th September and it is hoped to arrange a conference dinner on the evening of the same day. Aslib members who are making early reservations of accommodation in London for the conference should make a special note of this timetable.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Paraskevi Zacharia, Nikos Aspragathos, Ioannis Mariolis and Evaggelos Dermatas

The purpose of this paper is to present a flexible automation system for the manipulation of fabrics lying on a work table and focuses on the design of a robot control system…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a flexible automation system for the manipulation of fabrics lying on a work table and focuses on the design of a robot control system based on visual servoing and fuzzy logic for handling flexible sheets lying on a table. The main contribution of this paper is that the developed system tolerates deformations that may appear during robot handling of fabrics due to buckling without the need for fabric rigidization.

Design/methodology/approach

The vision system, consisting of two cameras, extracts the features that are necessary for handling the fabric despite possible deformations or occlusion from the robotic arm. An intelligent controller based on visual servoing is implemented enabling the robot to handle a variety of fabrics without the need for a mathematical model or complex mathematical/geometrical computations. To enhance its performance, the conventional fuzzy logic controller is tuned through genetic algorithms and an adaptation mechanism and the respective performance is evaluated. The experiments show that the proposed robotic system is flexible enough to handle various fabrics and robust in handling deformations that may change fabric's shape due to buckling.

Findings

The experiments show that the proposed robotic system is flexible enough to handle various fabrics and robust in handling deformations that may change fabric's shape due to buckling.

Research limitations/implications

It is not possible to cover all the aspects of robot handling of flexible materials in this paper, since there are still several related issues requiring solutions. Considering the future research work, the proposed approach can be extended to sew fabrics with curved edges and correcting the distortions presented during robot handling of fabrics.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for robot handling a variety of fabrics with low and medium bending rigidity on a working table. The intent of this paper deals with buckling in context of achieving a successful seam tracking and not the correction strategy against folding or wrinkling problems.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the fabrics' behavior towards robot handling on a working table.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Percy Chinoy and Marc Langlois

Printed circuit board designers face formidable challenges of increased functionality in smaller size boards, and reduced EMI in high‐speed circuits. Embedded passives technology…

Abstract

Printed circuit board designers face formidable challenges of increased functionality in smaller size boards, and reduced EMI in high‐speed circuits. Embedded passives technology can open up valuable space on the board surface while also improving the electrical performance and reliability of high density, high‐speed designs. Shipley has developed a thin‐film, high sheet resistivity (1,000 Ω/□) resistor material sold under the trade name InSite™ in response to this market need. This paper describes the manufacturing process for embedded resistors and discusses measured data on resistance values, uniformity, and thermal effects, and their impact on design rules for resistor size. Preliminary results of Shipley's thin‐film embedded capacitor technology with high capacitance densities (10 and 200 nF/cm2) are also presented.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2020

Antonella Francesca Cicchiello, Maria Cristina Pietronudo, Daniele Leone and Andrea Caporuscio

The aim of this research is to contribute to the existing literature about the entrepreneurial conditions in crowd-based contexts by describing how different European countries…

2632

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to contribute to the existing literature about the entrepreneurial conditions in crowd-based contexts by describing how different European countries regulate equity crowdfunding market in order to incentive the investments and protect investors.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a legal acts' analysis, we conduct a qualitative study comparing the crowdfunding regulation addressed to investors. In particular, we focus our analysis on the European countries with the highest concentration of crowdfunding platforms (i.e. the UK, Germany, France, Italy and Spain).

Findings

The results show that some countries, such as the UK, Germany and France, present an investor-oriented approach based on non-restrictive regulation, while other countries, such as Spain and Italy, have a restrictive approach that protects investors excessively and discourages them. In particular, the case study of France shows how the introduction of unrestricted regulation can produce positive effects on the volume of crowdfunding transactions.

Practical implications

The paper is addressed to investors, policymakers and intermediaries (platforms) to help the first in orienting themselves between the different crowdfunding regulations and the latter in aligning and orchestrating rules and norms.

Originality/value

This is the first study that analyses the role of investor-oriented regulations in the promotion of entrepreneurship through the identification of four key factors to monitor equity crowdfunding regulations.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Amorette Mae Perkins, Joseph Henry Ridler, Laura Hammond, Simone Davies and Corinna Hackmann

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of attending a Recovery College (RC) on NHS staff attitudes towards mental health and recovery, clinical and peer interactions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of attending a Recovery College (RC) on NHS staff attitudes towards mental health and recovery, clinical and peer interactions, and personal wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative and quantitative data were collected via online surveys from 94 participants. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used.

Findings

Themes were identified for change in attitudes towards mental health and recovery: new meanings of recovery; challenging traditional views on recovery; hope for recovery; and increased parity. The majority felt that the RC positively influenced the way they supported others. Themes relating to this were: using or sharing taught skills; increased understanding and empathy; challenging non-recovery practices; and adopting recovery practices. Responses highlighted themes surrounding impacts on personal wellbeing: connectedness; safe place; self-care; and sense of competency and morale at work. Another category labelled “Design of RC” emerged with the themes co-learning, co-production and co-facilitation, and content.

Research limitations/implications

It is important to understand whether RCs are a useful resource for staff. This research suggests that RCs could help to reconcile Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change’s 10 Key Challenges and reduce staff burnout, which has implications for service provision.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to directly explore the value of RCs for staff attending as students, highlighting experiences of co-learning.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

ANN M. RIDLER and J. STUART WEIR

The CNAA impact on research in librarianship has been in ways equally true of other subject areas. For this reason this paper aims to set the Council's involvement in the broader…

Abstract

The CNAA impact on research in librarianship has been in ways equally true of other subject areas. For this reason this paper aims to set the Council's involvement in the broader context of the work and policies of the Council in general, seen against published statements of government policy. It considers the nature of Council's responsibility for research, and the impact it seeks to have on research in public sector higher education, all of which is relevant to librarianship and may provoke reflection as to possible future developments in institutional provision for research in librarianship. The paper then analyses the applications Council has approved for research degrees in librarianship, and considers the likely trend of future developments.

Details

Library Review, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1970

Function libraries, and indeed the majority of organisations, especially those operating on a commercial basis or utilising public funds, consist of material and human structures…

Abstract

Function libraries, and indeed the majority of organisations, especially those operating on a commercial basis or utilising public funds, consist of material and human structures. The leaders of the human structure utilise personnel and materials in the pursuit of certain goals. Brech itemises four main elements in this process of planning and regulating enterprise activities. They comprise:

Details

New Library World, vol. 72 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

PHILIP HEPWORTH, NORMAN TOMLINSON, DON LOCKETT, JON FINNEY, MICHAEL DARVELL, AP RIDLER‐INNES and BRENDA WILLIAMS‐WYNN

NLW is to be congratulated on its promptly‐secured interview with Harold Hookway in a sparkling March number which compares very favourably indeed with the January LAR that I…

Abstract

NLW is to be congratulated on its promptly‐secured interview with Harold Hookway in a sparkling March number which compares very favourably indeed with the January LAR that I happened to be reading at the same time. Generous though it was of NLW in an earlier issue to lament Edward Dudley's passing (temporary no doubt) from the LA Council, surely here was a massive vote of no‐confidence in an editorial job universally admitted to be badly done. How can the head of a great and successful library school find time to edit his profession's official journal? I have previously suggested that the LA should try to establish some business relationship with the only current English library publication for all staff levels in all types of library that comes close to what the membership wants. Let the LA stick to those publications that it does very well and that enhance its reputation—Library history, and the Journal of librarianship, and pass the buck for a newsy popular magazine elsewhere.

Details

New Library World, vol. 74 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

1 – 10 of 55