Search results

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Nicholas A. Gage, HyunSuk Han, Ashley S. MacSuga-Gage, Debra Prykanowski and Alexandria Harvey

Classroom management is a prerequisite for effective instruction, yet research indicates that not all teachers implement evidence-based classroom management skills (CMS…

Abstract

Classroom management is a prerequisite for effective instruction, yet research indicates that not all teachers implement evidence-based classroom management skills (CMS) in their classroom. Therefore, efficient professional development models are necessary to increase teachers’ use of CMS, but those models are predicated on valid and reliable screening tools to identify teachers CMS performance. This study is a psychometric evaluation of a direct observation CMS screening tool for elementary school teachers that can be used as part of a targeted CMS professional development model. Based on a three-facet generalizability study, the primary source of variance across observations was differences among teachers and differences across observations. A decision study was conducted and indicates that a generalizable estimate from the CMS screening tool requires four 30-min observations. These results are compared with prior research and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Details

Emerging Research and Issues in Behavioral Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-085-7

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Brian F. Blake, Steven Given, Kimberly A. Neuendorf and Michael Horvath

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to present a framework of five “facets,” i.e., distinct but complementary ways in which the observed appeal of a consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to present a framework of five “facets,” i.e., distinct but complementary ways in which the observed appeal of a consumer shopping site’s features can potentially be generalized across product/service domains (the authors call this framework the feature appeal generalization perspective); second, to determine if and how observed feature preferences for consumer electronics, bookstores, and sites “in general” generalize across domains; third, to test hypotheses about the impact of frequency of domain usage upon feature generalizability.

Design/methodology/approach

Via an online survey administered in a controlled laboratory setting, 313 respondents evaluated 26 website features in three domains (books, electronics, general) for a total of 24,414 preference judgments.

Findings

Two facets, individual feature values and within domain evaluative dimensions, revealed minimal generalizability, while there was moderate comparability across all domains in between domain feature correspondence. Personal preference elevation could be generalized between books and general, but not between these two and electronics. Differentiating dimensions showed that preferences were not generalizable from electronics to books and general because consumers wanted electronics features to provide “flashy sizzle” and books/general features to give “comfortable safety.” As hypothesized, patterns of generalizability coincided with frequency of domain usage.

Research limitations/implications

Practitioners should not apply published studies of feature appeal to their domain of interest unless those studies directly analyzed that domain. Scientists should incorporate all five facets in modeling what attracts consumers to commercial websites.

Originality/value

This is the first multidimensional analysis of the generalizability of site feature appeal across business-to-consumer product/service domains, and the first to propose this integrated evaluative framework with its unique facets.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Adam Finn

This research seeks to present a methodology for investigating the generalizability of a theory‐testing model. The methodology is used to examine the generalizability of a…

1351

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to present a methodology for investigating the generalizability of a theory‐testing model. The methodology is used to examine the generalizability of a model of the antecedents and consequences of customer delight.

Design/methodology/approach

Theory testing of models in the marketing often fails to define an intended universe of generalization. This paper shows how multivariate generalizability theory can be used to estimate construct covariance components for specific sources of variance. These components can then be used to assess the generalizability of a structural equation model of a marketing phenomenon.

Findings

The parameters of a model of customer delight obtained from data that sample customers of a service or data that confound sources of variance do not generalize to data that capture variation across services or variation across raters. The relative impact of customer delight and satisfaction on behavioral intention varies with the source of variation being studied.

Practical implications

Previous research suggests that after controlling for customer satisfaction, customer delight accounts for very little variation in behavioral intention. But, for the source of variation of most relevance to managers, namely web sites, it is customer delight, not customer satisfaction, that is strongly associated with behavioral intention.

Originality/value

The methodology can be applied and can produce model parameters having substantially different managerial implications for the management of customer satisfaction and customer delight.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

George A. Marcoulides and Ronald H. Heck

Discusses current methodological problems with principalperformance appraisal and evaluation methods which have receivedconsiderable attention in the literature. Suggests…

Abstract

Discusses current methodological problems with principal performance appraisal and evaluation methods which have received considerable attention in the literature. Suggests that administrative performance appraisals can be conducted using a measurement technique called generalizability theory (”G” theory). Introduces “G” theory as a method for improving the dependability of principal performance appraisals.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Kevin D Carlson and Donald E Hatfield

In this chapter we ask a simple question: how can we tell if strategic management research is making progress? While other limitations are noted, we argue that it is the…

Abstract

In this chapter we ask a simple question: how can we tell if strategic management research is making progress? While other limitations are noted, we argue that it is the absence of metrics for gauging research progress that is most limiting. We propose that research should focus on measures of effect size and that “precision” and “generalizability” in our predictions of important phenomena represent the core metrics that should be used to judge whether progress is occurring. We then discuss how to employ these metrics and examine why existing research practices are likely to hinder efforts to develop cumulative knowledge.

Details

Research Methodology in Strategy and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-235-1

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Geng Cui, Ling Peng and Laurent Pierre Florès

New product concept screening, i.e., selecting a few viable innovative concepts from numerous candidates, involves high stakes and is complicated and resource intensive…

1284

Abstract

Purpose

New product concept screening, i.e., selecting a few viable innovative concepts from numerous candidates, involves high stakes and is complicated and resource intensive. Over the years, there has been heated debate about the relative merit of monadic (sequential) tests vs that of preference-based paired comparisons. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes the Generalizability Theory as a framework to assess and compare the performance of traditional monadic test with the Adaptive Concept Screening (ACS) in terms of their testing results and psychometric quality.

Findings

Using 50 yogurt concepts and two independent groups of respondents, the results indicate that ACS requires a significant smaller sample of respondents to achieve a necessary minimum G coefficient for decision making. Moreover, ACS offers a more discriminating and reliable solution for early stage concept screening as manifested by a higher G coefficient and greater percentage of variance due to the selected concepts given the same sampling design.

Practical implications

The results lend strong support to ACS as a more cost-effective method for screening new product concepts and the Generalizability Theory as a systematic framework for assessing concept testing methods.

Originality/value

This study adopts the Generalizability Theory framework to assess the validity of new product concept screening method.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Jiun‐Sheng Chris Lin and Pei‐Ling Hsieh

The purpose of this paper is to replicate and refine Parasuraman's 36‐item technology readiness index (TRI) across contexts and cultures to enhance its applicability and…

2753

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to replicate and refine Parasuraman's 36‐item technology readiness index (TRI) across contexts and cultures to enhance its applicability and generalizability for both researchers and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on psychometric procedures of scale development, four separate research phases, each one building on the previous, are performed using several samples. Measurement invariance analyses are performed across demographics, industries, and cultures to ascertain the stability of the refined versus the original scale.

Findings

A refined 16‐item TRI scale demonstrates sound psychometric properties based on findings from various reliability and validity tests, as well as scale replications employing several samples. The four dimensions remain stable across techniques and samples, while the utility of the refined scale increases due to ease of application. Measurement invariance analyses across demographic groups, industries, and cultures provide further support for the superior stability of the refined TRI.

Research limitations/implications

Assessment of TRI across different contexts and cultures enhances validity, utility, and generalizability by reducing the number of items, building a nomological network, and verifying stability.

Practical implications

Service firms should pay more attention to measurement of customers' technology readiness. For both researchers and practitioners, the refined 16‐item scale benefits from reduced complexity and enhanced utility of TRI across contexts and cultures. Service managers will find the refined TRI less complicated and easier to apply in customer surveys, which greatly benefits service firms attempting to better understand customers' TR when implementing self‐service technologies.

Originality/value

Replication and cross‐validation of new concepts play a valuable role in determining the scope and limit of empirical research findings; they allow researchers to demonstrate how broadly and in what circumstances such concepts can be used. While Parasuraman calls for studies to assess the generalizability of the TRI scale, the current lack of support for TRI's generalizability is an important gap that needs to be addressed. The current study fills that gap, increasing the applicability and generalizability of the TRI scale through refinement, replication and validation across several samples, contexts, and cultures.

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Joshua Keller and Ping Tian

The way organizational actors use language to think about and communicate their organizational experiences is central to how organizational actors enact organizational…

Abstract

The way organizational actors use language to think about and communicate their organizational experiences is central to how organizational actors enact organizational paradox. However, most inquiries into the role of language in the organizational paradox literature has focused on specific components of language (e.g., discourse), without attention to the complex, multi-level linguistic system that is interconnected to organizational processes. In this chapter, we expand our knowledge of the role of language by integrating paradox research with research from the linguistics discipline. We identify a series of linguistic tensions (i.e., generalizability-specificity, universalism-particularism, and explicitness-implicitness) that are nested within organizational paradoxes. In the process, we reveal how the organizing paradox of control and autonomy is interconnected to other paradoxes (i.e., performing, learning, and belonging) through the instantiation of linguistic paradoxes. We discuss the implications of our findings for research on paradox and language.

Details

Interdisciplinary Dialogues on Organizational Paradox: Investigating Social Structures and Human Expression, Part B
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-187-8

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Ad de Jong, Martin Wetzels and Ko de Ruyter

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the linkage between self‐managing team (SMT) member perceptions of collective efficacy and customer‐perceived service quality…

2162

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the linkage between self‐managing team (SMT) member perceptions of collective efficacy and customer‐perceived service quality, and the most cost‐efficient way to reliably assess collective efficacy and customer‐perceived service quality, using generalizability theory (G‐theory).

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal design; employee and customer survey data from 52 teams of a major financial services institution were collected at two points in time.

Findings

First of all, results of OLS regression analysis show a positive effect of collective efficacy on customer‐perceived service quality. In addition, taking a G‐theory approach, the results indicate that collective efficacy possesses a higher psychometric quality than customer‐perceived service quality and that the costs of reliably comparing SMTs on collective efficacy are considerably lower compared to customer‐perceived service quality. Finally, for both constructs, the results reveal subtle but relevant differences in psychometric quality and costs of data collection across different types of service (routine versus non‐routine) settings.

Practical implications

To begin with, as a linkage construct, collective efficacy provides managers a mechanism for team intervention by means of task‐focused team building, role‐play exercises, and using feedback to increase service employee confidence. Secondly, when deciding to use survey data as one means to compare performance of organizational units, managers should first determine to what extent the distinct measurement design facets (e.g. items, persons, and occasions) account for variance in measures and sample correspondingly to save money on data collection. In doing so, they should explicitly take into account the type of service context and type of respondent.

Originality/value

This study identifies collective efficacy and customer‐perceived service quality as a set of service SMT performance measures that meaningfully connects employee and customer perceptions at the group level. Secondly, a G‐theory approach was used to assess the psychometric quality of these two measures and how data collection costs can be minimized to achieve a desired level of generalizability.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Louise M. Hassan, Edward Shiu and Gianfranco Walsh

Long‐term orientation (LTO) is an important cultural value, which has been shown to meaningfully affect the behavior of individuals. Bearden et al. developed and tested a…

2894

Abstract

Purpose

Long‐term orientation (LTO) is an important cultural value, which has been shown to meaningfully affect the behavior of individuals. Bearden et al. developed and tested a two‐dimensional scale measuring LTO at the individual level. This study aims to replicate and extend the work of Bearden et al. examining the psychometric properties and generalizability of the scale across ten countries of the European Union (EU).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey‐based data were collected from 3,491 respondents across ten EU Member States via an internet questionnaire.

Findings

The LTO scale is found to possess adequate dimensional properties in the majority of country samples. Discriminant validity between the two LTO dimensions is not evidenced across four country samples. Significant association is found between LTO and individualistic orientation among respondents in nine of the ten countries with few significant associations found between LTO and uncertainty avoidance. Finally, the generalizability of the scale is assessed through Cronbach et al.'s (1963) generalizability theory and found to be satisfactory though discriminant validity is found to be lacking.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, the scale is recommended for use in measuring LTO with caution. Further research is needed to clarify the difference between the two subscales of tradition and planning.

Practical implications

Measuring and better understanding cross‐cultural differences in customers' LTO can be a means to overcoming difficulties in effectively marketing products and services across cultures.

Originality/value

The paper presents an original and first presentation of a cross‐cultural validation of a parsimonious LTO scale.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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