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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2023

Szilvia Nagy

This article explores the applicability of participatory action research (PAR) on two levels: on the one hand, as a participatory evaluation method for community engagement and…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the applicability of participatory action research (PAR) on two levels: on the one hand, as a participatory evaluation method for community engagement and community development; on the other hand, as a tool to link ex ante and ex-post evaluation that situated at various stages of the policy cycle.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a practice-based case study of the community engagement process of Valletta Design Cluster, this paper aims to illustrate how PAR can offer collaborative and continuous evaluation by facilitating social action through a practical, situative, context-bounded, responsive and transformative framework.

Findings

The study explores how PAR can contribute to cultural sustainability by linking community development with participatory evaluation, and it offers new perspectives on the applicability of PAR as a tool to link ex ante and ex-post evaluation, situated at various stages of the policy cycle.

Research limitations/implications

Although based on a single case, the paper demonstrates that the method has the potential to be applied in various contexts, as it helps to foster local ownership and to develop future cultural strategies, thus providing a base for cultural sustainability.

Originality/value

The novelty of this study is to link evaluation – a majorly top-down and ex ante approach – with participatory planning. PAR-E offers a continuous participatory framework for the whole European Capitals of Culture (ECoC) cycle, as well as serving as a tool for empowerment and community development.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 1 October 2011

Zoltán Buzády

Organizational innovation, leading change, customer service management in professional service firms.

Abstract

Subject area

Organizational innovation, leading change, customer service management in professional service firms.

Study level/applicability

Advanced undergraduate, MBA/executive education.

Case overview

This case describes the human resource (HR) dilemma faced by BDO Hungary in 2010, an international audit and tax consulting partnership, operating in the country since 1989. In order to continue its past growth story and to reach closer to “Big Four” BDO has to enter new business segments, offer more services to its existing customers and seize higher value-added business potentials. The new strategy, however, is challenged by its incumbent, traditional core business: auditing, which is highly regulated by ethical, legal, and professional standards including non-advertisement regulations to which the resulting organizational culture and HR routines are congruent. The case is described from the perspective of the Equity Partner, HR Director and Executive MBA student, who is tasked with a new HR plan for training and development and is charged with implementing it successfully. How best to adjust current training and development policies to the best meet new strategic growth goals? How to develop existing human capital? How to make employees more commercially oriented in such a conservative, risk averse, and highly regulated environment? How to improve their customer service and the sales skill?

Expected learning outcomes

Exploring the importance of training and development in improving customer service levels in professional service firms operating in emerging markets. Understanding the limitations and the possibilities of transferring international HR policies and standards across borders and cultural differences.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Júlia Tobak, Adrián Nagy, Károly Pető, Veronika Fenyves and András Nábrádi

The purpose of this paper is to present the experience, successful management and the succession of generations in a Hungarian corporation in the food industry through the “Best…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the experience, successful management and the succession of generations in a Hungarian corporation in the food industry through the “Best Practice” model.

Design/methodology/approach

The chosen methodology for this paper is “The best practice model” prepared by The Solutionist Group. The model presents the characteristics of family businesses and illustrates how the process of sustainable enterprise differs in different fields concerning family and non-family businesses. In applying this model, the experience, successful management and the succession of generations will be presented in the case of a large Hungarian enterprise which has a determining role in the Hungarian food industry. The results are based on the question framework of the expert interviews.

Findings

The history of family-owned firms shows that in order to maintain appropriate business succession activity the family management has to plan in advance. Passing the baton to the next generation successfully is a complex and long-term family management role and it has strategic importance. To ensure business continuity, the successor has to take over the business and operate it well. That is why the sharing of knowledge, the innovation performance and the best practice are important parts of family company’s culture, and they consequently play an important part in the pass the baton project within family-owned firms.

Originality/value

This paper expands the knowledge about the succession of family businesses.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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