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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Susan Jones and Katie Chapman

Non-dominant voices have been further marginalised in the most recent national curriculum in England (DfE, 2014), and those working across the English teaching profession often…

Abstract

Purpose

Non-dominant voices have been further marginalised in the most recent national curriculum in England (DfE, 2014), and those working across the English teaching profession often find the subject framed according to narrow, assessment-driven models and prescribed skill sets. This paper aims to bring together two perspectives on the importance of literacy education that remains rooted in young people’s everyday experiences of place.

Design/methodology/approach

Chapman is a newly qualified secondary English teacher. She will share examples taken from her own classroom practice of the ways in which she has responded to stories told by young people about the places in which they live.

Findings

Jones is a tutor of initial teacher education (ITE). She suggests that Chapman’s approach provides persuasive exemplification of how engagement with alternatives to a dominant view of literacy should remain a key objective for those working with beginning teachers of English.

Originality/value

For Chapman’s students, urban legends are powerful texts which offer the means to explore what we do when we tell stories, both inside and outside the English classroom. As will be shown, such stories are telling examples of the resources young people can bring to critical literacy learning in current classrooms. In the context of the dominance of a narrow, mandated experience of English as a subject, the imperative becomes even greater to recognise stories such as those shared by Chapman’s students as opportunities for authentic, creative and critical engagement with text.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Susan Jones

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Melissa Thomas-Hunt, Meredith Gethin-Jones and Susan Fleming

Marissa Mayer has been asked to think about factors that were impacting Google's ability to innovate and adjust its strategy so that the organization could remain one of the…

Abstract

Marissa Mayer has been asked to think about factors that were impacting Google's ability to innovate and adjust its strategy so that the organization could remain one of the world's foremost leaders in technology. In an industry (and at a company) that was changing and growing exponentially, it would be difficult to pinpoint specific variables and trends. But Mayer knew that one element crucial to Google's ongoing success would be its ability to recruit the best talent available and foster an environment that would encourage that talent to generate the best ideas. As Mayer contemplated how to ensure this, she considered that women currently represented only a small fraction of Google's engineers, suggesting a missed opportunity.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2013

Paul Gibbs, William R. Jones and Susan Oosthuizen

The aim of this paper is to present the second in an annual series of selected papers from the 2012 Conference of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning (UALL). The…

106

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present the second in an annual series of selected papers from the 2012 Conference of the Universities Association for Lifelong Learning (UALL). The Conference, at Clare College, Cambridge, took as its theme Higher education for the social good? The place of lifelong learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an editorial.

Findings

The editorial explores the conference theme and introduces the papers in this issue.

Originality/value

The five papers are indicative of the theme of the conference and, more generally of all those involved in lifelong learning.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1976

Susan Jones

This paper gives an account of a joint project by the Library and the Computer Services Unit of LSE to produce the annual supplement of the ‘London Bibliography of the Social…

Abstract

This paper gives an account of a joint project by the Library and the Computer Services Unit of LSE to produce the annual supplement of the ‘London Bibliography of the Social Sciences’ by computer. The 1974 supplement is now in print and the following is a critical account of the methods used, and some suggestions about possible future improvements.

Details

Program, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1972

KA STOCKHAM, JOHN RUSSELL, SUSAN WHATELEY and NORAGH JONES

The ‘interview’ undergone by the young prince in W F Yeames' well known painting shown on our front cover this month, was more painful than most. But job interviews are more often…

Abstract

The ‘interview’ undergone by the young prince in W F Yeames' well known painting shown on our front cover this month, was more painful than most. But job interviews are more often than not rather harrowing—at least in prospect—and we have asked four authors, each representing a different part of the interviewing spectrum, to give us their views about the process, its importance, and how best to approach something which happens to most of us at least once in our professional careers.

Details

New Library World, vol. 73 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2013

Kelly Edwards, Kirsten Merrill‐Glover, Robert Payne and Danny Saunders

The aim of this paper is to describe a successful strategy for a HE partnership engaging with businesses in a socially deprived area.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe a successful strategy for a HE partnership engaging with businesses in a socially deprived area.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach to this project and report is one of a case study, the paper tells a whole story from inception to delivery and reports on the lessons learned in delivering in a socially deprived region. Success for the project has been based on partners’ existing frameworks allowing accredited outcomes at CQFW levels 4 and 5 which provides a curriculum offer tailored to sector priorities and provides progression opportunities within the broader HE framework.

Findings

The project has demonstrated the point that employer responsiveness is fundamental to success. To build upon the experiences of the project team, a work‐based learning project forum has been set up between similar projects within both institutions, to disseminate information and minimise the duplication of employer engagement activities. Based on previous experience, there is little direct mailing to companies as this has activity has not provided value for money in terms of student recruitment and awareness raising. The work of the Employer Engagement Training Officers in identifying demand for learning amongst employers and employees in the region has been critical in developing appropriate provision which employees will choose to engage with. Changes have been made in the philosophy of recruiting tutors to ensure the most experienced staff are engaged. The planning of delivery takes place even earlier to combat associated delays in validation, procurement and marketing.

Originality/value

Distinctive features of the project are twofold. First, the majority of learning takes place through active and reflective engagement within places of work. Second, cognisant of both the geography and economic demography of the region, employers and employees take advantage of work‐based learning opportunities in cluster groups and hence the curriculum offer reaches out across both sectors and workforce subgroups.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Susan Jones

Contrasts traditional western organizations with moredemocratically run high performance cultures. Opposing interpersonalattitudes and skills at the root of this contrast are…

721

Abstract

Contrasts traditional western organizations with more democratically run high performance cultures. Opposing interpersonal attitudes and skills at the root of this contrast are identified. Illustrates academic evasion of the democratic dimension, allowing managers to marginalize vital attitudes and skills, and misapply strategies to reinforce the traditional command‐and‐control culture. Prevailing hierarchical attitudes are exemplified to be the cause of the high failure rate of TQM, employee involvement, customer care programmes, etc. Consultants and academics are urged to highlight the need to tackle core attitudes at the head of organizations as the key prerequisite of radical culture change, high learning and innovation, and long‐term competitiveness.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Pertti Vakkari, Susan Jones, Andy MacFarlane and Eero Sormunen

This study explored how the expression of search facets and relevance feedback (RF) by users was related to search success in interactive and automatic query expansion in the…

1066

Abstract

This study explored how the expression of search facets and relevance feedback (RF) by users was related to search success in interactive and automatic query expansion in the course of the search process. Search success was measured both in the number of relevant documents retrieved, whether identified by users or not. Research design consisted of 26 users searching for four TREC topics in Okapi IR system, half of the searchers using interactive and half automatic query expansion based on RF. The search logs were recorded, and the users filled in questionnaires for each topic concerning various features of searching. The results showed that the exhaustivity of the query was the most significant predictor of search success. Interactive expansion led to better search success than automatic expansion if all retrieved relevant items were counted, but there was no difference between the methods if only those items recognised relevant by users were observed. The analysis showed that the difference was facilitated by the liberal relevance criterion used in TREC not favouring highly relevant documents in evaluation.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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