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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Allen S. Daniels, Susan Bergeson, Larry Fricks, Peter Ashenden and Ike Powell

This paper aims to focus on The Pillars of Peer Support initiative, an ongoing project to examine and develop the principles of peer support services. These services are…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on The Pillars of Peer Support initiative, an ongoing project to examine and develop the principles of peer support services. These services are differentiated from peer support and define the parameters of a certified workforce that promotes recovery and fosters wellbeing. This process is based upon the lived experience of the peer support specialist.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature indicates that a range of models and activities for peer support services have been developed, and established outcomes for these services are emerging. Since Medicaid has defined peer support services as reimbursable, the workforce has continued to expand. The Pillars of Peer Support initiative is designed to provide a standard set of principles to guide states in their work with Medicaid, and others in the development of this workforce.

Findings

The results of three Pillars of Peer Support summits are presented. This includes the 25 Pillars that have been developed and their role and use in state funded and other services. Additional findings support the process through which states and others can build these resources. A statement of how Peer Support Services fit within an essential health benefits package is also included.

Originality/value

The workforce of certified peer specialists is rapidly expanding. Their role in providing peer support services is identified, and principles to guide their professional roles are presented. This will help guide the field in the development and deployment of this important component of the healthcare delivery system.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Shawn McEntee

This paper uses a social network approach to explore converging world‐systems hypotheses regarding the effects of increasing integration of socialist countries into the…

Abstract

This paper uses a social network approach to explore converging world‐systems hypotheses regarding the effects of increasing integration of socialist countries into the capitalist world economy since the height of the Cold War. Research on interdependence and other power relations among states in the world order cite the development of Intergovernmental Organizations (IGOs) and their expanding numbers as evidence of an evermore sophisticated network in which countries have unique positions related to their functioning in the world order. Theories of International Development and International Relations suggest that at the beginning of the Cold War, capitalist states and socialist states functioned in effectively mutually exclusive realms. The balance of power between the US and the USSR perpetuated a world order in which, for the most pan, capitalist states did not engage in political or economic relations with socialist states and vice versa.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 16 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2021

Jenny Edge and Susan Wheatley

This paper aims to gain a detailed understanding of their experience of well-being from the perspective of mental health peer workers.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to gain a detailed understanding of their experience of well-being from the perspective of mental health peer workers.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretative phenomenological analysis design using semi-structured interviews was conducted with four peer workers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and then analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Participants described their experience of well-being in terms of a journey over time that followed an unpredictable course. They understood their well-being in terms of their engagement in occupations. An occupational science framework was used to understand the participants’ experience of their well-being in terms of doing, being and becoming.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to approach the exploration of the experience of well-being for peer workers using an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis design.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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