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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Susan A. Chapman, Gary Blau, Robert Pred and Andrea B. Lopez

A very limited number of studies have explored factors related to emergency medical services (EMS) workers leaving their jobs and the profession. This paper aims to investigate…

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Abstract

Purpose

A very limited number of studies have explored factors related to emergency medical services (EMS) workers leaving their jobs and the profession. This paper aims to investigate the correlates of intent to leave EMS jobs and the profession and compared two types of workers: emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics.

Design/methodology/approach

A national sample of 308 EMTs and 625 paramedics responded to a cross‐sectional survey. Independent variables were personal, job related, and work attitudes (job satisfaction). Outcomes were intent to leave job and profession. Analytic methods included factor analysis, t‐tests, correlation, and hierarchical regression.

Findings

Factor analysis identified a five‐item intrinsic job satisfaction measure and a four‐item extrinsic job satisfaction measure across both samples. Contrary to what hypothesis one predicted, paramedics had lower extrinsic job satisfaction than EMTs. There was no difference between these two groups on intrinsic job satisfaction. Consistent with the second hypothesis, after controlling for personal and job‐related perceptions, extrinsic job satisfaction was negatively related to intent to leave job and profession for both EMTs and paramedics. However, intrinsic job satisfaction was negatively related only to intent to leave the profession for paramedics.

Research limitations/implications

Future research efforts might utilize stronger measures and incorporate longitudinal methodologies to further explore the career intention of EMS workers and similar occupational groups.

Originality/value

This paper examines job satisfaction and job and career intentions in a rarely studied occupation that provides critical prehospital emergency care to the population.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Gary Blau, Susan A. Chapman and Melinda Neri

The purpose of this paper is to distinguish knowledge gained vs skills learned as two learning-related training criteria; and to then test the impact of two career motivation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to distinguish knowledge gained vs skills learned as two learning-related training criteria; and to then test the impact of two career motivation variables, home care intent and stepping stone, for explaining these training criteria beyond controlled-for variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a sample of 720 personal/home care aides (P/HCAs) who filled out pre-training and post-training surveys. Training consisted of 25 modules, lasting approximately 100 hours on various P/HCA knowledge bases, with training sessions generally five to six hours/day, four to five days/week over a three to four week period. Factor analyses, correlation, and hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed that these two learning outcomes, knowledge gained vs skills learned, could be differentiated and reliably measured. Subsequent hierarchical regression analyses showed additional discriminant validity for these two learning outcomes. For the two measured career motivation variables, home care intent and stepping stone, home care intent was positively related to both learning outcomes but stepping stone only had a significant positive impact on skills learned. Training delivery was significantly related only to knowledge gained, while instructor rating was significantly related only to skills learned.

Originality/value

A unique sample of P/HCA trainees was utilized to test for this previously untested learning outcome distinction. As the population ages and demand increases for P/HCAs, additional training and studies evaluating such training will be needed.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Susan Jones and Katie Chapman

Non-dominant voices have been further marginalised in the most recent national curriculum in England (DfE, 2014), and those working across the English teaching profession often…

Abstract

Purpose

Non-dominant voices have been further marginalised in the most recent national curriculum in England (DfE, 2014), and those working across the English teaching profession often find the subject framed according to narrow, assessment-driven models and prescribed skill sets. This paper aims to bring together two perspectives on the importance of literacy education that remains rooted in young people’s everyday experiences of place.

Design/methodology/approach

Chapman is a newly qualified secondary English teacher. She will share examples taken from her own classroom practice of the ways in which she has responded to stories told by young people about the places in which they live.

Findings

Jones is a tutor of initial teacher education (ITE). She suggests that Chapman’s approach provides persuasive exemplification of how engagement with alternatives to a dominant view of literacy should remain a key objective for those working with beginning teachers of English.

Originality/value

For Chapman’s students, urban legends are powerful texts which offer the means to explore what we do when we tell stories, both inside and outside the English classroom. As will be shown, such stories are telling examples of the resources young people can bring to critical literacy learning in current classrooms. In the context of the dominance of a narrow, mandated experience of English as a subject, the imperative becomes even greater to recognise stories such as those shared by Chapman’s students as opportunities for authentic, creative and critical engagement with text.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

ROY DAVIES

Q‐analysis is a methodology for investigating a wide range of structural phenomena. Structures are defined in terms of relations between members of sets and their salient features…

Abstract

Q‐analysis is a methodology for investigating a wide range of structural phenomena. Structures are defined in terms of relations between members of sets and their salient features are revealed using techniques of algebraic topology. However, the basic method can be mastered by non‐mathematicians. Q‐analysis has been applied to problems as diverse as discovering the rules for the diagnosis of a rare disease and the study of tactics in a football match. Other applications include some of interest to librarians and information scientists. In bibliometrics, Q‐analysis has proved capable of emulating techniques such as bibliographic coupling, co‐citation analysis and co‐word analysis. It has also been used to produce a classification scheme for television programmes based on different principles from most bibliographic classifications. This paper introduces the basic ideas of Q‐analysis. Applications relevant to librarianship and information science are reviewed and present limitations of the approach described. New theoretical advances including some in other fields such as planning and design theory and artificial intelligence may lead to a still more powerful method of investigating structure.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2018

Trevor Gale and Stephen Parker

In this chapter we provide a brief history of student fees in Australian higher education (HE), particularly from 1974 when fees were abolished but more substantially from 1989…

Abstract

In this chapter we provide a brief history of student fees in Australian higher education (HE), particularly from 1974 when fees were abolished but more substantially from 1989 when they were re-introduced. Of particular interest is the impact of student fees on the equity of access in HE: what has become known in Australia as the proportional representation of ‘equity’ groups (i.e. groups defined by gender, socioeconomic status, disability, indigeneity, rurality or language background; see Martin, L. (1994). Equity and general performance indicators in higher education. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.), although latterly the focus has been on socioeconomic status (SES). Our analysis is of Australian Government policy, framed by a ‘quality of mind’ that C. W. Mills (1959, p. 14) refers to as the ‘sociological imagination’. That is, we draw attention to the absence of this imagination in much government policy, which falsely separates the personal troubles of individuals (e.g. in financing access to HE) from the public issues of societies (e.g. in universalising HE), with a tendency to ascribe responsibility for student fees to the former over the latter. In these terms, we characterise the history of access to Australian HE — specifically the role that student fees have played in this — as fluctuating from personal trouble to public issue and back again.

Details

Higher Education Funding and Access in International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-651-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some…

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Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2013

Barbara Pocock, Sara Charlesworth and Janine Chapman

This paper aims to explore recent changes in Australia's work‐family policies and programs and their implications for gender (in)equality.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore recent changes in Australia's work‐family policies and programs and their implications for gender (in)equality.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors critically assess a suite of new work/family‐related policies, including the introduction of a government‐funded national paid parental leave scheme, a limited right to request flexible working conditions, and the extension of state and federal anti‐discrimination legal protections for workers with family responsibilities.

Findings

The analysis suggests a lack of coherence and integration between various work/family related policies and the need for a wider range of reforms, particularly in relation to domestic work and care. It is found that the gendered use of flexibility rights, like the new right to request, do not necessarily improve gender equality and may work to entrench it in the face of strong gendered workplace and societal norms and practices around work and care. As a consequence women workers and mothers – who have been constructed as the work/family problem to be “fixed” – are left even more rushed and pressed for time.

Originality/value

This empirically‐informed analysis shows the power of the broader gender political and normative context and the limits of modest and piecemeal policy reform in relation to work‐family issues – even where economic conditions remain relatively positive. The paper concludes that without robust, multi‐faceted and integrated policy reform around work and family, in which gender equality outcomes are a central objective, policy reforms will fail to achieve a more equal sharing of paid and caring work between men and women, and greater equality between women and men more generally.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 33 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

JUDITH D. CHAPMAN

The implementation of the policy of devolution in the government school system of Victoria, Australia, has significantly enhanced the opportunities for teachers to become involved…

Abstract

The implementation of the policy of devolution in the government school system of Victoria, Australia, has significantly enhanced the opportunities for teachers to become involved in the decision making of schools. This article reports on a study designed to investigate the factors associated with involvement. Analysis of the data found teacher involvement in the decision making of schools to be associated with: gender; seniority and organizational responsibility; age and teaching experience; affiliation with the teachers association; the influence of the principal; the individual's sense of personal, political and professional efficacy; the individual's confidence and trust in the organization and its administration; the conflicting demands, anxiety and pressure of time; and the perceived effects of participation on curriculum and teaching practice.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Marian Court

Draws on excerpts from interviews with six women teacher/leaders in Taranaki, New Zealand to explore arguments that in Western cultures men maintain power and control of the…

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Abstract

Draws on excerpts from interviews with six women teacher/leaders in Taranaki, New Zealand to explore arguments that in Western cultures men maintain power and control of the sexual division of labour in the home, which is allied to a sexual division of labour at work. Uncovers some of the links between the women’s home and school experiences in their accounts of their negotiations of what have commonly been seen as contradictory subject positions of leader/wife; mother/career woman. Shows from the women’s stories about their personal lives and aspirations, however, that for reasons that were quite complex, some of them were themselves maintaining gendered divisions of labour. Suggests some implications for further research.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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