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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2024

Josephine Davis, Coral Wiapo, Lisa Sami, Ebony Komene and Sue Adams

This paper delves into the enduring influence of Linda Tuhiwai Smith’s groundbreaking work, “Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples,” while examining how the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper delves into the enduring influence of Linda Tuhiwai Smith’s groundbreaking work, “Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples,” while examining how the concept of “struggle” has facilitated Māori-centric nursing education.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing a case study approach, a collaboration between Māori and non-Māori nursing academics describes the development of two Māori-centric postgraduate courses. This approach allows for an exploration of the contextual factors surrounding sites of “struggle” in course development and efforts towards decolonization and indigenization.

Findings

The evaluation of a Māori-centric postgraduate course is guided by Smith’s five key conditions for “struggle”. By illustrating the dynamic and intersecting nature of these conditions, the study reveals how various interests, tensions and relationships intersect within academia. We further show how the team actively sought viable solutions to strengthen the Maori nursing workforce and those nurses serving Maori communities through the development of tailored courses.

Originality/value

This case study offers a unique perspective on the tensions inherent in the struggles faced by Māori women and their allies, who utilize cultural frameworks as sites of resistance within Western institutions. We highlight how education can carve out new spaces for Māori within their cultural context and the broader academic sphere. Inspired by Smith’s work, this dialogue transcends academic boundaries, echoing the values, knowledge and experiences of Indigenous peoples marginalized by colonialism.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Sue Adams

Older people (particularly 75 years+) are the main users of health and social care services. They are also the age group most likely to occupy non‐decent homes. Government health…

Abstract

Older people (particularly 75 years+) are the main users of health and social care services. They are also the age group most likely to occupy non‐decent homes. Government health and social care policy is increasingly focused on enabling more older people to remain living independently in their own homes and on delivery of care ‘at or closer to home’. This article considers how greater recognition of the negative impacts of poor‐quality and inappropriate housing on older people's health and well‐being, combined with targeted housing repair and adaptation assistance, could contribute to achieving a range of current health and social care objectives, including enabling older people to live independently in mainstream housing and better management of chronic health conditions.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Sue Adams

The Government's drive to improve the overall health of the population, by tackling health inequalities and measures such as reducing falls and ending fuel poverty, has created a…

1443

Abstract

The Government's drive to improve the overall health of the population, by tackling health inequalities and measures such as reducing falls and ending fuel poverty, has created a policy framework to address the housing related aspects of health. Opportunities for the NHS and local authorities to work with the voluntary sector to achieve these aims mean that there are new possibilities for wide‐ranging, innovative responses to improving people's health by tackling housing issues.Care & Repair England has undertaken research which examines how home improvement agencies (HIAs) are working with health‐sector partners to bring about health improvement through housing‐related initiatives and services.The resulting report, Healthy Homes, Healthier Lives, brings together key evidence that demonstrates the beneficial impact of improved housing conditions on health and examines the current policy context. A spectrum of joint projects is profiled including schemes providing information and training for health and care sector staff, a range of joint approaches to falls prevention, hospital discharge services and initiatives to address fuel poverty and cold, damp housing.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Sue Adams

The vast majority of older people (90%) live in the general housing stock and 70% are owneroccupiers. One of the major challenges for planners in the housing, health and social…

Abstract

The vast majority of older people (90%) live in the general housing stock and 70% are owneroccupiers. One of the major challenges for planners in the housing, health and social care sectors is the development of a coherent joint strategy which enables older people to live independently in their own homes. Home improvement agencies (HIAs) aim to meet the housing and related support needs of mainly older home‐owners. Research carried out by Care and Repair England has been tracking and studying the diversification of HIAs into services areas which ‘cross the housing and care divide’. The results of this work have recently been published. They demonstrate both the range and the extent of new service provision by HIAs and its value both to older people wishing to ‘stay put’ and to planners charged with implementing cross‐sector work and prevention strategies.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2010

Abstract

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

Government and IT ‐ In spite of all the lip service paid by Government to making a business of information and encouraging increases in the amount of information available online…

Abstract

Government and IT ‐ In spite of all the lip service paid by Government to making a business of information and encouraging increases in the amount of information available online, the Department of Trade is still indulging in foot dragging about online access to tradenames. Since 1979, tradenames have been held on computer and I was told in that year (NLW, November 1979) by the Department of Trade that an index to tradenames would be produced shortly and sold to libraries and others on COM‐fiche. Now two computer indexes are poised for the public market, but it seems the Department of Trade is once again playing a will we? won't we? game, because if the Department went online, the others might not bother. The first independent computer data base is with Datema Limited who have carried out very successful field trials with Laurence Tagg in Newcastle‐upon‐Tyne Business Library, as well as at Sheffield and the Science Reference Library; the second data base is with Compu‐Mark (UK) Limited in London.

Details

New Library World, vol. 85 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

Clive Bingley, Edwin Fleming and Sarah Lawson

CONCLUDING THAT much of the ennui which afflicted me during 1980 must have been due to my forfeiture of the mid‐winter skiing holiday to which I have become accustomed in recent…

Abstract

CONCLUDING THAT much of the ennui which afflicted me during 1980 must have been due to my forfeiture of the mid‐winter skiing holiday to which I have become accustomed in recent years, I have arranged to be back among the mountains of Austria at the time when this issue of NLW is committed to the mercies of the postal services. (Postage rates having just gone up, do let me know if your copy reaches you earlier than usual — that would be called ‘productivity’!).

Details

New Library World, vol. 82 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way…

10226

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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