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1 – 10 of 201
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

G. Roos, Lisa Fernström and S. Pike

The purpose of this paper is to review the research into the relationship between human resource management (HRM) and business performance. The paper examines the change of the HR…

14404

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to review the research into the relationship between human resource management (HRM) and business performance. The paper examines the change of the HR function into HRM taking on its current strategic role. Recent work on the links between HRM and business performance is reviewed highlighting the conclusion that while the links are not disputed by researchers using a variety of approaches, the ability to characterize definitive causal links has proved almost impossible. The techniques and resource‐based approach of intellectual capital (IC) may provide the key to quantifying the links but again, work to date has proved that it may not be possible to clearly separate HRM from other management actions to quantify the effects of HRM. A solution based on the IC approach involving rigorous measurement is suggested.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Anne Fletcher, James Guthrie, Peter Steane, Göran Roos and Stephen Pike

Few authors have examined the intellectual capital of non‐profit organizations or discussed their strategic management in terms of intangibles. The Australian Red Cross Blood…

9726

Abstract

Few authors have examined the intellectual capital of non‐profit organizations or discussed their strategic management in terms of intangibles. The Australian Red Cross Blood Service (ARCBS), a third sector organization, is the subject of this study. The purpose of the study is to better understand the value dimensions of the ARCBS from an external stakeholder perspective. Outcomes include the creation of a value hierarchy, inclusive of the views of 11 stakeholder groups. The results show overall agreement amongst stakeholders about the four most highly valued key performance areas (KPAs) of ARCBS (safe product, product sufficiency, donor and volunteer management and public confidence). However, there were many differences between different stakeholder groups in their perceptions of the relative importance of the nine KPAs and their constituent attributes. As a result of the study ARCBS has a basis to manage strategy, organizational performance and communication with stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Bernard Marr, Oliver Gupta, Stephen Pike and Göran Roos

Building on the complexities of organizational knowledge creation the paper explores the alignment of knowledge management practices with the epistemological beliefs of…

7290

Abstract

Building on the complexities of organizational knowledge creation the paper explores the alignment of knowledge management practices with the epistemological beliefs of individuals or groups in organizations. A pan‐European research project investigated individual’s philosophy about truth, knowledge and the optimum approach of knowledge creation. These individual viewpoints and requirements are then contrasted with the knowledge management practices implemented in organizations. The results highlight significant misalignment between knowledge management requirements in epistemological terms and individual’s perception of organizational knowledge management activities. The paper claims these differences lie at the heart of problems companies experience with extracting value from knowledge management initiatives. The paper suggests ways of identifying and evaluating resource transformations in organizations, in order better to understand and manage knowledge creation to grow the intellectual capital of organizations.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2007

Tzu‐Ju Ann Peng, Stephen Pike and Göran Roos

While the intellectual capital perspective has been widely applied to research in knowledge‐intensive industries, less attention has been paid to the healthcare sector. This…

5244

Abstract

Purpose

While the intellectual capital perspective has been widely applied to research in knowledge‐intensive industries, less attention has been paid to the healthcare sector. This exploratory study aims to investigate how hospitals view the importance of intellectual capital and performance in the healthcare sector. It identifies the elements and relative importance of intellectual capital and performance measurement in the Taiwanese healthcare industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was executed by a developmental process comprising four phases: the generation of critical elements; expert review and perceptual assessments of the elements; data collection; and data analysis. This study developed a preliminary checklist with detailed IC elements and performance indicators derived from both literature reviews and practices. The questionnaire was refined by expert review. The pilot study collected data from 30 healthcare managers.

Findings

The critical intellectual capital elements and performance indicators regarded as important for performance management practices in the Taiwanese hospital industry were identified. They reveal the relative importance and ranking of human, organizational and relational capitals, and performance indicators.

Practical implications

By using the intellectual capital navigator (ICN) and the Effector Plot, this study analyzed resource transformations and resource influence among human, organizational and relational capital. This study highlighted five noteworthy issues.

Originality/value

This study will contribute to both theory and practice. Theoretically, it generalizes IC in the healthcare setting and is a starting point for exploring healthcare IC and performance in Taiwan. Practically, it contributes to references for healthcare managers, giving a prioritized array of critical resources and performance measurements in practice.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

John Heeley

The purpose of this paper is to examine urban destination marketing from a mainly practitioner standpoint, though one of its principal observations is the gap between theory and…

1043

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine urban destination marketing from a mainly practitioner standpoint, though one of its principal observations is the gap between theory and practice; while the former is premised on related notions of difference and competitive advantage, in practice the greater part of urban destination marketing eschews competitive advantage, resulting in a pervasive marketing of “sameness”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is in three parts. The first set out the urban tourism context in respect of historical, market, supply, impact and definitional/measurement dimensions. Part two profiles the bespoke delivery mechanisms established for urban destination marketing, examining nomenclature, core purpose/mission, status, size and finances, as well as overhead and operating parameters.

Findings

The final section comprises a state-of-the-art review, setting out a five variable model of purposeful urban destination marketing, concluding that “good” in urban destination marketing is atypical and currently in Europe is confined to only a handful of European cities.

Originality/value

This paper is intended to give the reader a better understanding of why, in such an important field of human endeavour, success is so problematic. It hopefully gives pointers to practitioners and academics as to how best in future there can be more winners and fewer losers, so that increasing numbers of towns and cities maximise the impact locally of the world's largest industry and at the same time become “known”.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Philip K. M’Pherson and Stephen Pike

The application of proper measurement to a company generating products, services, cash flow and reputation largely from intellectual capital (IC) assets is examined. The…

3128

Abstract

The application of proper measurement to a company generating products, services, cash flow and reputation largely from intellectual capital (IC) assets is examined. The particular focus is to measure the organisation so that the contributions of intangibles to the business are measured in their own right. If the measurements are feasible in practice (they are), they will render the tangible as well as the intangible assets of a company to be managed explicitly. Then the contributions of the intangibles to cash flow become measurable, and thence on to estimates of business value, and shareholder value. Shows that the process view of an organisation deconstructs the “classical” structure of IC categories and formulations, and rearranges them in a form whose state and process variables are observable, measurable, and properly dimensioned for a multidimensional measuring space. Ends with a demonstration of the method applied to a hotel organisation that exemplifies many of the problems of measuring and optimising IC assets.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Bernard Marr and Jay Chatzkel

This introductory editorial to the special issue “IC at the crossroads: theory and research” explains the rationale and background to the studies. In addition it outlines reasons…

3357

Abstract

This introductory editorial to the special issue “IC at the crossroads: theory and research” explains the rationale and background to the studies. In addition it outlines reasons why the field of intellectual (IC) capital is at the crossroads. It seems that awareness of the importance of IC has been created. It is now the role of researchers as well as practitioners to move to the next level. This next level involves issues around taxonomies as well as research methodologies. In order to move on, precise definitions of concepts such as IC, better justifications of why organizations need to measure and manage IC, and increased clarity about terms such as measurement, assessment, or valuation are needed. In addition, more rigorous research methods are needed in order to test and validate existing theories in the field.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Jay Chatzkel

This conversation with Göran Roos explores leveraging the interrelated roles of intellectual capital and strategy in contemporary organizations. Roos has created frameworks which…

1007

Abstract

This conversation with Göran Roos explores leveraging the interrelated roles of intellectual capital and strategy in contemporary organizations. Roos has created frameworks which make the intangible of intellectual capital understood as a very real asset and to be cultivated, measured and appropriately exploited for competitive advantage. The conversation examines how to work with management to rethink strategies and practices to determine and utilize the drivers for intellectual capital growth, as well as how to rigorously valuate and effectively use intellectual resources throughout their enterprises to make significant differences. These approaches have been used in a wide variety of both private and public sector organizations around the world in a broad range of market segments.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Mike Bourne

Presents a number of papers from the Performance Measurement Association conference held in July 2002. Reveals that all the papers investigate developments in the field of…

2617

Abstract

Presents a number of papers from the Performance Measurement Association conference held in July 2002. Reveals that all the papers investigate developments in the field of performance measurement and management since the Kaplan and Norton Balanced Scorecard was first introduced.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Bernard Marr

With intellectual capital and intangible assets high on the agenda of executives around the world, and little practical evidence of good practice in measuring and managing these…

2562

Abstract

Purpose

With intellectual capital and intangible assets high on the agenda of executives around the world, and little practical evidence of good practice in measuring and managing these assets, there is a great need for help. This editorial to a special issue on the topic introduces the problem and highlights key issues. The special issue provides an overview of how management consulting companies acting in this space suggest tackling the problem. The purpose is therefore to bring together the approaches of different management consulting firms and to make their differences explicit.

Design/methodology/approach

All major general management consulting firms as well as specialist consulting firms focusing in the area of intellectual capital and intangible assets were directly invited to submit a paper for this special issue. The call for papers was also made publicly available in the journal and through e‐mail campaigns by Emerald. All submissions underwent a double‐blind refereed selection process.

Findings

Even though many submissions were received for this special issue, most of the authors were not able to demonstrate a sufficient understanding of the constructs nor were they able to justify the tools and methodologies developed. Reviewers were made aware of the practical background of many of the authors and it was ensured that sufficient and constructive feedback was provided. Even with various rounds of reviews many papers had to be rejected as they resembled marketing brochures rather then logical discussions. This unfortunately shows that there still is a massive skills gap in the industry and companies should be careful before they engage with any management consulting firm to help them measuring or managing their intangibles.

Practical implications

The focus of potential papers was not academic rigor (as opposed to the Special Issue Vol. 5 No 2) but the provision of an overview of the state of the art in intellectual capital consulting practice. The papers therefore provide practitioners with good insights into current practice.

Originality/value

This special issue is the first to bring together in a structured and rigorous format different management consulting approaches to the measurement and management of intellectual capital and intangible assets.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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