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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2022

Natalia G. Vidal, Wellington Spetic, Simon Croom and Donna Marshall

This study examines the relationship between supply chain stakeholder pressure from customers and suppliers for the adoption of social and environmental sustainable supply chain…

1034

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship between supply chain stakeholder pressure from customers and suppliers for the adoption of social and environmental sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices given the simultaneous conditional effects of both entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and sustainability orientation (SO).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey of US firms focused on their relationship with their top supplier or buyer by spend. This study used conditional process analysis to measure the relationship between stakeholder pressure and adoption of SSCM practices as well as the double moderation effects of EO and SO on this relationship.

Findings

The results show that both EO and SO simultaneously function as moderators of the effect of supply chain stakeholder pressure on the adoption of social and environmental SSCM practices. However, EO will only get firms so far in the adoption of SSCM practices. Once a strong SO takes effect, higher practice adoption ensues but the effect of stakeholder pressure weakens.

Practical implications

For those firms that have lower levels of SO, EO and supply chain stakeholder pressure are still essential drivers for the adoption of SSCM practice. The results of this study suggest that focal firms should work closely with suppliers to increase their levels of SO while also maintaining pressure for the adoption of SSCM practices.

Originality/value

This study shows the concurrent effect of two organizational level drivers on the adoption of SSCM practices, indicating that efforts in developing a strong SO are more likely to prepare firms for the adoption of SSCM practices.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Simon Croom, Natalia Vidal, Wellington Spetic, Donna Marshall and Lucy McCarthy

Socially sustainable supply chain (SSSC) practices address pressing social issues and may provide operational benefits as well as positive impacts on society. However, due to gaps…

4303

Abstract

Purpose

Socially sustainable supply chain (SSSC) practices address pressing social issues and may provide operational benefits as well as positive impacts on society. However, due to gaps in the current knowledge, it is difficult to know what practices will provide benefits and what management orientations can maximize the impact of these practices on operational performance. The purpose of this paper is to advance the knowledge on the effect of social sustainability orientation on operational performance by examining the mediating roles of basic and advanced SSSC practices and the moderating role of long-term orientation (LTO).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey of US-based companies about their relationships with key suppliers. Confirmatory factor analysis and multiple regression were used to test the proposed moderated mediation model.

Findings

Surprisingly, sustainability orientation predicts operational performance through advanced but not basic SSSC practices. Results also indicate that the effect of sustainability orientation on operational performance is significantly moderated by LTO.

Research limitations/implications

Results are limited by the US context, the cross-sectional nature of the research, the use of a single-respondent survey instrument and the challenges of measuring LTO.

Practical implications

Managers and policymakers should be aware of the limitations of adopting basic SSSC practices on the performance of their operations. Advanced practices provide a more robust business case and significantly and positively impact operational performance. In addition, the interaction of a sustainability orientation and LTO can lead to even greater improvements in firms’ operational performance. Firms with the highest levels of social sustainability and LTOs attain superior operational performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing literature on sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) and extends this literature by focusing on social sustainability practices, identifying specific practices that impact and the orientations that maximize operational performance. The authors contribute to the growing literature on the importance of manager’s temporal orientation and provide nuance to emerging SSCM theory by exposing the interplay of these orientations and the impact of SSSC practice adoption.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Simon R. Croom and Alistair Brandon-Jones

This paper presents the analysis from a study into the key lessons learned from e-procurement implementation across a range of UK public sector organisations. The literature…

1301

Abstract

This paper presents the analysis from a study into the key lessons learned from e-procurement implementation across a range of UK public sector organisations. The literature relating to e-procurement implementation and operation is reviewed, identifying five main themes addressed by the current literature: impact on cost efficiency; the impact on the form and nature of supplier transaction; e-procurement system implementation; broader IT infrastructure issues; and the behavioural and relational impact of eprocurement. The research carried out was intended to explore the perceptions and reflections of both 'early' and 'late' adopters of e-procurement. Seven key lessons are drawn from the study and presented here. We conclude by proposing areas for further research, including the need for research into failed eprocurement projects.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Simon Croom and Robert Johnston

E‐business developments represent a significant step in the evolution of inter‐organisational systems (IOS). Their impact on external supply chains is a major area of discussion…

7959

Abstract

E‐business developments represent a significant step in the evolution of inter‐organisational systems (IOS). Their impact on external supply chains is a major area of discussion and analysis in the literature, principally examining issues of governance structure and process efficiencies. This paper, however, addresses issues relating to the impact of e‐business developments on internal customer service with a focus on electronic procurement introduction – in other words it concentrates on the intra‐organisational system dynamics of e‐business. The procurement process is the basis for one of the primary internal customer‐provider interfaces and thus presents a valid and useful domain of study in internal customer service. In contributing to the emerging e‐service field the article first contends that much of the recent research into e‐service has taken a primarily external customer focus. However, reports suggest that the potential of e‐business comes from applications both within and between businesses. Consequently, this paper focuses on the findings relating to internal e‐service obtained from an extensive, primarily qualitative and exploratory, research programme incorporating 97 organisations. The article concludes that internal customer satisfaction is central to the success of e‐procurement deployment and is a significant determinant of the cost benefits to be gained from its adoption.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Andrew Cox, Daniel Chicksand and Tong Yang

The purpose of this paper is to show that a proactive sourcing strategy can be just as important as a proactive marketing strategy in achieving sustainable competitive advantage.

5743

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that a proactive sourcing strategy can be just as important as a proactive marketing strategy in achieving sustainable competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on action research carried out in the UK beef industry, with a focus on the food service supply chain. The methodology is inductive and qualitative, using a multi‐case, multi‐site approach. The supply chains presented in the case were analysed from farm gate to consumer, interviewing multiple participants at each stage of the supply chain.

Findings

This study offers some partial support for configuration‐based approaches. However, the case also raises some doubts about the validity of configuration thinking, as it is not the complexity or ambiguity of the relationships that is key in the case, but the fact that brand ownership and contracts create property rights for their owner that create a relatively permanent power resource for Pioneer, the case study company, in its market struggle with its customers and competitors. This interpretation supports the power and property rights views of strategic management rather than the configuration approach.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based upon in‐depth knowledge of the UK beef and red meat industry. It would be beneficial if further in‐depth studies could be undertaken in other agri‐food supply chains to further validate the findings.

Practical implications

Although the focus of this article has been upon choosing appropriate sourcing strategies, the case study has also illustrated the importance for business managers of linking this sourcing strategy with a firm's marketing, and more specifically its branding strategy.

Originality/value

The paper analyses the key differences in demand, supply and power and leverage characteristics in the food service beef supply chain to highlight the need for government agencies, think‐tanks and industry participants to have a more robust understanding of industries before advocating the adoption of any one approach for all UK agri‐food supply chains. This paper should be of value to researchers in this area and to managers responsible for strategy formation in UK agri‐food supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Simon Croom

This paper examines the optimisation of purchasing for maintenance, repair and operating supplies (MRO) through purchase process re‐engineering. In particular, the use and…

4375

Abstract

This paper examines the optimisation of purchasing for maintenance, repair and operating supplies (MRO) through purchase process re‐engineering. In particular, the use and development of the Internet as a channel for procurement of MRO items was examined from a transaction cost perspective. The focus of this paper is on the impact of Web/Internet based electronic commerce on the structure of MRO supply chains. The paper provides a discussion of the theoretical basis for analysis of the impact of e‐commerce on supply chain structure, and presents existing literature in the area. The empirical research involved a series of semi‐structured interviews with UK, European and US based manufacturers, retailers, government bodies, and service organisations. Respondents ranged from experienced users of e‐procurement to organisations just starting out on their pilot investigations of the contribution of Internet trading to their purchasing efficiency. The impact on supply chain configuration of greater information transparency may be posited to be one which will lead to increased outsourcing, improved procurement processes and more strategic management of MRO purchases.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Simon R. Croom

198

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Simon R. Croom

E‐business systems and processes that use ubiquitous platforms such as web browser and internet have a profound impact on the management of inter‐organisational processes…

18904

Abstract

Purpose

E‐business systems and processes that use ubiquitous platforms such as web browser and internet have a profound impact on the management of inter‐organisational processes. Consequently, a major implication of e‐business is its impact on supply chain management. This paper focuses on the developments in e‐business system adoption and deployment in support of supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

The research conducted for this paper was empirical in nature, involving an interview study with a large sample of organisations and selected case study visits. Analysis of the impact of e‐business on supply chain strategy also examines three representative areas of supply chain management – procurement, customer relationship management, and fulfilment process.

Findings

E‐business systems deployment was also seen to act as a significant catalyst for each of the three areas examined, although this paper presents only the findings from the exploratory study.

Originality/value

From the research analysis it was possible to develop a normative, five‐stage, model classifying the evolution of e‐business systems deployment for supply chain management. Finally proposes the need for longitudinal research to surface the underlying dynamics of e‐business adoption and deployment.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of 301