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1 – 10 of 218
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2022

Yehuda Baruch and Sherry E. Sullivan

The field of careers studies is complex and fragmented. The aim of this paper is to detail why it is important to study careers, what we study and how we study key issues…

Abstract

Purpose

The field of careers studies is complex and fragmented. The aim of this paper is to detail why it is important to study careers, what we study and how we study key issues in this evolving field.

Design/methodology/approach

Key theories, concepts and models are briefly reviewed to lay the groundwork for offering an agenda for future research.

Findings

The authors recommend ten key directions for future research and offer specific questions for further study.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to the development of the theoretical underpinning of career studies.

Practical implications

The authors hope that the proposed agenda for future research will help advance the field and encourage more research on understudied, but important, topics.

Originality/value

This paper presents a comprehensive view of research on contemporary careers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2007

Sherry E. Sullivan and Lisa Mainiero

This chapter explores the linkage between the careers of women over the lifespan and their experience of stress. Traditional models of career stages were developed by…

Abstract

This chapter explores the linkage between the careers of women over the lifespan and their experience of stress. Traditional models of career stages were developed by studying men's careers and do not fit the complexities of women's careers. Several newer models of careers have appeared in the literature but none of these models adequately address the issues women face as they juggle work responsibilities and their family lives. We discuss the Kaleidoscope Career Model (KCM) as a means of understanding the parameters that may affect women's decision making about their careers and the relationship between these parameters and the experience of stress. Testable propositions based on this model using the Kaleidoscope Careers Self-assessment Inventory (KCSI) are included as ideas for future research. Recommendations for organizational programs and policies are also detailed.

Details

Exploring the Work and Non-Work Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1444-7

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

S. Gayle Baugh and Sherry E. Sullivan

This special issue seeks to examine mentoring relationships and offer new perspectives and frameworks, suggesting exciting avenues for future research on mentoring and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This special issue seeks to examine mentoring relationships and offer new perspectives and frameworks, suggesting exciting avenues for future research on mentoring and career development.

Design/methodology/approach

In the last two decades, the workplace has been dramatically transformed. Individuals traditionally had careers entrenched in organizations, relying on the paternalistic firm for career development. Increasingly now, individuals are enacting careers outside organizational boundaries, defining career success on their own terms rather than by the organizational measures of salary and rank. Rapid technological change and globalization have intensified the decoupling of individual careers from organizations, putting more emphasis on individuals for their own career development and creating an even greater need for mentoring.

Findings

Although much research has been done on the impact of mentoring on subjective and objective career success, there are still many unexamined and under‐explored aspects of mentoring. This collection of ten articles tackles some of these areas, providing new insights and offering new avenues for research and practice.

Originality/value

These articles are authored by individuals from a variety of disciplines (e.g. organizational behavior, psychology, health care), and countries (e.g. USA, UK, Nigeria), with each article bringing a unique lens to the study of mentoring and careers. Individually, each article makes a contribution to the better understanding of how mentoring has evolved and is enacted today. Together, this collection of articles provides important insights that it is hoped encourage even further research into the complexities of developmental relationships and their impact on career development.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 10 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Madeline M. Crocitto, Sherry E. Sullivan and Shawn M. Carraher

This article aims to examine the process of mentoring and career development within the global arena. Although much has been written on the adjustment of expatriates…

8281

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to examine the process of mentoring and career development within the global arena. Although much has been written on the adjustment of expatriates, relatively little research has examined the exchange of information and knowledge among workers in different countries via the mentoring process.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is offered of how an expatriate progresses through learning cycles aided by multiple mentors. Multiple mentoring contributes to the individual's career development and facilitates the development of organizational tacit and embedded knowledge.

Findings

Using Hall and Chandler's conceptualization of multiple learning cycles over the life span, it is proposed that the expatriate cycles through a learning cycle over the course of an extended assignment. These learning cycles are shorter than the traditional career stages, often lasting two to four years – similar to the length of an expatriate assignment. It is suggested that the stages of an expatriate assignment – predeparture, on‐site and repatriation – represent a learning cycle. A successful expatriate experience is more likely to occur if multiple mentors in various locations are available – as needed – to offer information and career support to the expatriate.

Originality/value

With increasing globalization and rapid technological advances, mentoring relationships that cross national and other types of boundaries have increased, yet theory has not kept pace. A framework is provided for the further examination of expatriate careers and how mentoring can increase career outcomes and knowledge transfer.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 10 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Milad Jannesari and Sherry E. Sullivan

Using a career lens, the purpose of this paper is to examine the psychological factors related to the career success (e.g. performance and adjustment) of self-initiated…

Abstract

Purpose

Using a career lens, the purpose of this paper is to examine the psychological factors related to the career success (e.g. performance and adjustment) of self-initiated expatriates (SIEs).

Design/methodology/approach

This research examines the previously unstudied relationship between career adaptability and career success. Data were collected by surveying 273 SIEs employed in professional jobs in China.

Findings

As hypothesized, career adaptability was positively related to performance as well as to adjustment. Psychological availability mediated the relationships of career adaptability with performance and with adjustment. Contrary to expectations, supportive supervision did not moderate the relationship between career adaptability and either performance or adjustment.

Research limitations/implications

Because the data were collected in a single, self-report survey, future studies should collect longitudinal data so that the effects of changes in career adaptability on adjustment and performance can be determined. In addition, as all of the participants were professionals, future research should examine SIEs employed in blue-collar jobs.

Originality/value

As this is the first study to consider how career adaptability may influence SIEs’ performance and adjustment, it offers unique insights into the work experiences of SIEs. Additionally, this study examines the theoretical underpinnings of career construction theory, namely, the previously hypothesized but untested relationship between career adaptability and adjustment.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Milad T. Jannesari and Sherry E. Sullivan

The number of self-initiated expatriates (SIEs) is growing, yet we know relatively little about their work experiences, especially how they react to stress. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The number of self-initiated expatriates (SIEs) is growing, yet we know relatively little about their work experiences, especially how they react to stress. The purpose of this study is to examine whether challenge and hindrance stressors influence SIEs' intent to remain as well as the possible influence of emotional resilience and cultural novelty upon these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 249 SIEs working in China.

Findings

As hypothesized, hindrance stressors were negatively related to the SIEs' intent to remain. Contrary to expectations, challenge stressors were not associated with intent to remain. Hindrance (challenge) stressors were negatively (positively) related to emotional resilience, and resilience mediated the relationship between stressors and intent to remain. Cultural novelty failed to moderate the relationship between emotional resilience and intent to remain and did not moderate the mediated effects of challenge stressors on intent to remain via emotional resilience. Cultural novelty did moderate the mediated effects of hindrance stressors on intent to remain via emotional resilience, but not in the hypothesized direction.

Research limitations/implications

This study was cross-sectional. It examined SIEs working in China, and its findings may not be generalizable to SIEs working in other countries.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine how emotional resilience may mediate the relationship between stressors and SIEs' intent to remain and also considered the possible moderating effects of cultural novelty. In addition, unlike most studies that focus only on the negative outcomes of hindrance stressors, this study tested the possible positive effects of challenge stressors.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Sherry E. Sullivan

Over the past decade, researchers and managers alike have begun to recognize that we are in the “age of globalization”. Examples of the increasing integration of nations…

Abstract

Over the past decade, researchers and managers alike have begun to recognize that we are in the “age of globalization”. Examples of the increasing integration of nations and businesses include:

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2022

Ajay K. Jain, Shalini Srivastava and Sherry E. Sullivan

Although common throughout the world, little is known about the mechanism by which nepotism is associated with employee outcomes. Drawing from social exchange theory, this…

Abstract

Purpose

Although common throughout the world, little is known about the mechanism by which nepotism is associated with employee outcomes. Drawing from social exchange theory, this study examines whether fear-based silence mediates the relationship between nepotism with employee workplace withdrawal and career satisfaction. In addition, whether gender moderates the relationship between nepotism and fear-based silence is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Two time-lagged surveys of 330 employees in the Indian banking sector were completed.

Findings

As hypothesized, nepotism was positively related to fear-based silence and employee workplace withdrawal; it was negatively related to career satisfaction. Fear-based silence partially mediated the relationships of nepotism with workplace withdraw and career satisfaction. Gender moderated the relationship between nepotism and fear-based silence.

Practical implications

This study shows the negative impact of nepotism on employee outcomes and suggests means for reducing its prevalence in organizations.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine fear-based silence as a mediator of nepotism’s relationship with employee workplace withdrawal and career satisfaction. It also answers repeated calls for more research on fear-based silence and its antecedents.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Milad T. Jannesari and Sherry E. Sullivan

The continued expansion of organizations outside China's planned economy due to the Belt-and-Road Initiative (BRI) is expected to increase recruitment of self-initiated…

Abstract

Purpose

The continued expansion of organizations outside China's planned economy due to the Belt-and-Road Initiative (BRI) is expected to increase recruitment of self-initiated expatriates (SIEs). Drawing on social capital, motivation and socialization theories, this study examines the experiences of SIEs in China, which is considered one of the most difficult locations for foreigners to work. While previous research has focused on the impact of individual characteristics on adjustment, this study explores the interplay among relationship quality (trust and shared vision), autonomous work motivation, socialization experience and adjustment.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the developed theoretical framework, hypotheses are proposed and tested using data collected by surveying 274 SIEs in China.

Findings

Relationship quality with host country nationals (HCNs) was positively associated with adjustment, and autonomous work motivation fully mediated this relationship. Socialization experience moderated the association between relationship quality and autonomous work motivation. Specifically, SIEs' socialization experience strengthened the associations of trust and shared vision with autonomous work motivation. However, socialization experiences failed to moderate the mediated effects of trust and shared vision on adjustment via autonomous work motivation.

Originality/value

This study answers repeated calls for more research on SIEs' adjustment and SIEs working in non-Western countries, especially China. The findings underscore the importance of studying SIE-HCN work relationships and the theoretical value of autonomous work motivation as an underlying mechanism by which the quality of an SIE's relationship with an HCN colleague influences adjustment.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Howard S. Tu, Monica L. Forret and Sherry E. Sullivan

The aim of this paper is to conduct an exploratory empirical examination to determine if factors (e.g. demographic, human capital, motivational, and organizational…

3094

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to conduct an exploratory empirical examination to determine if factors (e.g. demographic, human capital, motivational, and organizational) associated with career success in Western countries are also related to the career outcomes of Chinese managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were obtained from 139 managers working in China. Correlation and regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship among common predictors of career success and the actual outcomes of Chinese managers.

Findings

Predictors of two career outcomes were explored: total compensation and career satisfaction. Although some of the findings were similar to the findings of studies on the career outcomes of managers in Western countries, there were some surprising differences. The results showed that women and top‐level decision makers had higher total compensation. Furthermore, holding a middle management (as opposed to a line management) position, and perceptions that one's organization was successful were associated with greater career satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The difficulties of conducting research in another country, especially one under communist rule, resulted in a relatively small sample size, which may limit the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Knowledge of the career processes of Chinese managers is important for the growing number of Western firms investing in and conducting business in China as well as for Chinese firms in their attempts to increase their efficiency and productivity.

Originality/value

Although there have been calls to expand research on careers outside the West, to date there are few published studies on the career experiences of those in Asian countries, especially in China. This research highlights the importance of country context in the study of careers in non‐western settings and tests the generalizability of Western findings on career success.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

1 – 10 of 218