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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Shelley L. MacDougall and Deborah Hurst

The use of contingent knowledge workers may be an efficient means of investing in an organization's intellectual capital. However, exposing contingent workers to private, key…

3977

Abstract

Purpose

The use of contingent knowledge workers may be an efficient means of investing in an organization's intellectual capital. However, exposing contingent workers to private, key competitive knowledge is considered risky. A study was undertaken to collect the costs, benefits and losses experienced by organizations that had contracted contingent knowledge workers to develop intellectual capital.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposive cross‐section of senior managers of knowledge‐intensive organizations were interviewed regarding the tangible benefits, costs, perceived risks, and experienced losses from contingent knowledge worker arrangements. The constant comparison method of analysis was used.

Findings

The data revealed perceived increases in flexibility, expertise, creative stimuli, and knowledge bank development. These benefits were believed to have bottom‐line impact through product and process improvements and innovations, and operational efficiencies. The managers did not perceive much risk or experience material losses as a result of the contingent knowledge worker arrangements.

Research limitations/implications

These findings are based on interviews with a small group of organizations. Although not generalizable, they present an interesting contrast to previous researchers’ conclusions regarding the use of contingent knowledge workers. Further empirical work is needed to test the degree to which this study's findings can be generalized.

Practical implications

Contrary to recent literature, this study suggests that contracting contingent knowledge workers to develop in‐house intellectual capital is worth the risk.

Originality/value

The study presents a divergent viewpoint on the contracting of contingent knowledge workers. It also initiates research on rational evaluation of investments in intellectual capital, which constitutes an important contribution to the area of knowledge management. It also contributes to the ongoing research on intellectual capital valuation.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Deborah Hurst, Shelley MacDougall and Chris Pelham

While there is no definitive profile of the successful entrepreneur or prescribed pathway for success, research suggests that individuals who proactively accommodate factors that…

2532

Abstract

Purpose

While there is no definitive profile of the successful entrepreneur or prescribed pathway for success, research suggests that individuals who proactively accommodate factors that push and pull them into entrepreneurship, align their personal and entrepreneurial visions, and to some extent, build emotional intelligence (EQ), are more likely to succeed. This paper aims to describe an entrepreneur counseling process developed and used by the Acadia Centre for Social and Business Entrepreneurship (ACSBE), located in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose an entrepreneur's success, negotiation of push and pull factors, and EQ are all linked, and the ACSBE counseling model draws on these. The case study method was used. ACSBE staffs were interviewed regarding the entrepreneur counseling process, counselor‐training sessions were observed and documents were reviewed. Two ACSBE clients, who together started a successful fair‐trade business, were interviewed for their insights regarding the ACSBE counseling model and their own experiences starting their business.

Findings

The responses of the ACSBE clients illustrate a successful application of the ACSBE Entrepreneurial Decision Making Cycle©. Their personal values, business strategies and performance were linked to promote success personally and for society. Both entrepreneurs were authentic, self‐aware and empathetic individuals who were able to hone their EQ and develop sound business acumen with assistance of the ACSBE counseling model.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis of the ACSBE counseling model and its success in this case leads to the question of whether the application of the ACSBE Entrepreneurial Decision Making Cycle can predict those more likely to succeed in an entrepreneurial venture. In order to address this, further research of the ACSBE decision tool is recommended.

Originality/value

The ACSBE Entrepreneurial Decision Making Cycle is unique. It should be of interest to entrepreneur counselors and researchers of entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1960

NOT for a long time have books and libraries featured in the correspondence columns of The Times and other newspapers as regularly as they have in 1960. Earlier in the year Sir…

32

Abstract

NOT for a long time have books and libraries featured in the correspondence columns of The Times and other newspapers as regularly as they have in 1960. Earlier in the year Sir Alan Herbert's lending rights' scheme had a good run, and we have clearly not yet heard the last of it. Indeed, a Private Member's bill on the subject is to have its second reading in Parliament on December 9th. More recently, the Herbert proposals have had a by‐product in the shape of bound paperbacks, and a correspondence ensued which culminated in Sir Allen Lane's fifth‐of‐November firework banning hard‐covered Penguins for library use.

Details

New Library World, vol. 62 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18;…

18677

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management…

14781

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18;…

14400

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18;…

14168

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2023

Tom Harrison

Adopting a sense of critical enquiry when examining historical sources, it is possible to gain a richer and broader sense of present practice. The aim of this study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Adopting a sense of critical enquiry when examining historical sources, it is possible to gain a richer and broader sense of present practice. The aim of this study is to emphasise the importance of historical research to present practice in teasing out the different elements at work and how they developed. A core assumption is that our consciousness depends on our interactions with others.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is part of ongoing research into the historical background of the practice of discerning compassion. The methods used include archival research and the reading of primary and secondary literature.

Findings

In particular, it becomes clear that this way of working is always going to be problematic for political authorities as it promotes the questioning of accepted beliefs. This study emphasises that the core concepts underlying enabling community practice reach deep into the past and involve events not usually associated with the traditional histories of the approach. In particular, exploring outside of the traditional mental hospital background reveals a greater involvement of women than previously demonstrated. There are processes that have deep historical roots, the culture of enquiry, the benefits of mutual support and the understanding that people flourish better interacting with each other in a supportive and trusting environment rather than through coercion and instruction.

Research limitations/implications

As with all historical research, this paper is limited by the resources available to examine particular events.

Practical implications

Recognition of the importance of historical enquiry as relevant to present-day practice.

Social implications

Historical enquiry helps to acknowledge the importance of social events in shaping our present understanding. As W.H. Rivers argues, we have to understand what happened in the past before comprehending why present sociological events occur.

Originality/value

This paper is a unique enquiry into the early historical antecedents of enabling community practice. It is intended to stimulate more research into the field and to stimulate debate about the relevance of particular aspects of practice. It refers to sources that are not usually part of such discussions and, by implication, suggests that there is more to be explored. It is not an exhaustive account and is to be supplemented by another paper on leadership.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 44 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Keywords

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