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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Doga Istanbulluoglu, Sheena Leek and Isabelle T. Szmigin

The purpose of this paper is to help researchers and practitioners to understand and respond to consumer complaining behaviour (CCB) by developing a taxonomy that addresses the…

2138

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to help researchers and practitioners to understand and respond to consumer complaining behaviour (CCB) by developing a taxonomy that addresses the inadequacies of previous consumer complaining taxonomies and models, simplifies the terminology and covers both traditional and new ways of complaining.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a systematic review of 210 studies, a concept-centric analysis of CCB literature was conducted. Seminal taxonomies and models of CCB are revisited and a critical evaluation of these is presented.

Findings

An integrated taxonomy of CCB is proposed which enhances the understanding of complaining in the twenty-first century by clarifying the ambiguities and overlapping constructs in the previous taxonomies.

Research limitations/implications

The integrated taxonomy of CCB eliminates the ambiguity of previous approaches and introduces more coherent constructs in relation to the theory of CCB. The taxonomy comprehensively defines and describes the range of complaining actions to provide a complete framework. As a result, the authors’ understanding of CCB is developed through a focus on complaining actions, their characteristics and what these actions afford companies in their attempts to deal with complaints (i.e. audience and amount of information available).

Practical implications

Practitioners can use the integrated taxonomy of CCB to structure their complaint handling processes to obtain maximum customer feedback, to improve their product/service and to retain customers through satisfactorily addressing their complaints.

Originality/value

Although the literature on consumer complaining is mature, this is the first paper that offers a comprehensive taxonomy that explains CCB while addressing new developments in computer-mediated communications.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Sheena Leek, Sarah Maddock and Gordon Foxall

This paper examines the problems of launching new products onto the market, particularly healthy foods and fish products. Research was undertaken to investigate whether consumers…

1303

Abstract

This paper examines the problems of launching new products onto the market, particularly healthy foods and fish products. Research was undertaken to investigate whether consumers would be prepared to purchase a new concept, i.e. polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) fed fish, premium price PUFA fish and different species of PUFA fish, specifically salmon, eel and sturgeon. The factors influencing the respondents’ decisions were investigated. The methodology utilised a questionnaire containing both qualitative and quantitative questions and several group discussions. It was found that the majority of the sample found the concept of PUFA fish acceptable and plausible and were prepared to pay a premium price, but the number of people prepared to purchase specific PUFA species was lower. Although health was given as a main reason for purchase other factors such as image, physical appearance of the whole animal, sensory properties, the type of product and the price also had to be satisfied for a clear purchase intention to be indicated.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Sheena Leek and Dai Kun

The paper seeks to identify the sources of confusion in the Chinese personal computer market and the confusion reduction strategies used.

2745

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to identify the sources of confusion in the Chinese personal computer market and the confusion reduction strategies used.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐completion questionnaire with a sample of 140 respondents was used.

Findings

Technological complexity is the major source of confusion. Word of mouth is the most common source of information used to reduce confusion due to its credibility and reliability.

Practical implications

Technical confusion leads to similarity confusion and overchoice confusion. Manufacturers and retailers need to address technical confusion to reduce the overall level of confusion in the PC market.

Originality/value

The paper examines confusion in an Eastern culture, whereas previously it has been predominantly investigated in Western cultures.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Sarah Maddock, Sheena Leek and Gordon Foxall

Outlines the numerous messages sent to consumers regarding healthy eating practices and indicates the problems involved in determining whether or not the British consumer has…

3665

Abstract

Outlines the numerous messages sent to consumers regarding healthy eating practices and indicates the problems involved in determining whether or not the British consumer has adopted a nutritious and healthy diet. Research was undertaken which measured individuals’ involvement in healthy eating issues and related this to several demographic characteristics. The research indicates some variation in involvement in healthy eating according to demographic variables but the results were not statistically significant. Group discussions were also conducted which confirmed that the healthy eating messages were widely received and understood; however, there was some confusion over their content, scepticism regarding the veracity and motivation of some sources and a growing resentment of boring and puritanical themes. In the future care must be taken to produce clear, simple and positive healthy eating messages to the public if trends towards a more nutritious diet are to continue.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Sheena Leek and Louise Canning

This paper seeks to investigate the role of social capital in facilitating the entry of new business ventures into service networks.

2671

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the role of social capital in facilitating the entry of new business ventures into service networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical work is undertaken via case study‐based research, featuring three service businesses, each entering and operating in a different marketplace.

Findings

Results show that new service businesses are not necessarily able to draw on existing social capital in order to enter a business network and build relationships with potential customers and suppliers.

Research limitations/implications

Future empirical work should re‐examine the distinctions between the role and nature of social capital for new service businesses.

Practical implications

The paper suggests how the new service entrepreneur might invest personal resources in networking to initiate relationships and build a network of customers and suppliers.

Originality/value

The paper presents the little researched area of networking and relationship initiation as a means of developing social capital for new service businesses.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Sheena Leek, Sarah Maddock and Gordon Foxall

Despite having properties well‐suited to “healthy‐eating”, fish is a declining product. Consumers’ evaluations of fish are known to differ between consumers and non‐consumers, but…

2936

Abstract

Despite having properties well‐suited to “healthy‐eating”, fish is a declining product. Consumers’ evaluations of fish are known to differ between consumers and non‐consumers, but the precise differences, which might be of use in the development of a marketing campaign, are vague. Analyses suggest that the factors that influence consumer choice are predominantly environmental, and a model of situational determinants of consumption (the behavioural perspective model or BPM) is proposed as a theoretical framework. A random sample of UK consumers (n = 311) provided information on their past and intended purchasing of three types of fish product – fresh, frozen and canned – and on their beliefs regarding the consequences of fish consumption. Factor analysis reveals that such beliefs regarding fish fall into one of five components: versatility, situational relevance, negative properties, economy, and convenience. Multiple regression analysis indicates that these are differentially related to fish consumption. In general, fish consumers differed on all five factors from non‐consumers, but important deviations from this generalisation were identified for fresh, frozen and canned fish. Suggestions for marketing action and further research are derived from the practical applicability of the results and the support they provide for components of the BPM.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Katy Mason, Ilan Oshri and Sheena Leek

Firms face the challenge of developing learning capabilities that enable them to work as part of an effective business network. While an extensive literature examines learning…

1012

Abstract

Purpose

Firms face the challenge of developing learning capabilities that enable them to work as part of an effective business network. While an extensive literature examines learning capabilities within the firm, little attention has been given to shared learning that occurs between networked firms. This study aims to explore how a manufacturer and businesses services provider learn to develop their supply network. Specifically, this research investigates four areas of shared learning that are central to supply network success, and discusses the development of shared learning capabilities within a supply network.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an in‐depth, longitudinal case study of a supply network that involves an engineering company and two business services suppliers.

Findings

The study suggests that developing shared learning capabilities in four key areas is imperative for network success: business relationships, customers’ desired values, firm boundaries, and network structures. Furthermore, there are three distinct types of shared learning that were common to all four areas of shared learning identified. These are: strategic shared learning, operational shared learning, and exchange shared learning.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings are based on a single case study. Additional research across multiple case studies is needed in order to verify the findings reported.

Practical implications

The four learning areas have significant managerial implications for the way managers develop mechanisms to capture and share learning associated with developing supply networks.

Originality/value

This research addresses a gap in the literature concerning the areas of learning capabilities for developing a supply network. The findings are important to research and practice with regard to how companies develop learning capabilities.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Martin Hingley, Sheena Leek and Adam Lindgreen

The purpose of this study is to investigate the “human factor” inherent in business‐to‐business relationships and its impact on the key phases of business relationships…

1371

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the “human factor” inherent in business‐to‐business relationships and its impact on the key phases of business relationships: relationship attraction and initiation; relationship development; and relationship dissolution.

Design/methodology/approach

Interpretation is made by utilising the song lyrics of the prolific English singer Morrissey as a template for interpersonal relationship structures that can be applied to interpersonal business‐to‐business relationships.

Findings

Highlighted are findings from recent case investigations into business‐to‐business relationships where the “human factor” is particularly important in maintaining business interaction. The findings show that key concepts relating to business‐to‐business relationships (the need to enter relationships, power and dependency, and relationship break‐up) are not always in the realms of corporate rational thinking. Alternatively, business decisions owe much to the less rational and more emotional world of interpersonal relations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a combination of both theoretical and practical study, but is only a starting‐point in terms of necessary empiricism. The paper concludes with suggestions of further necessary empirical investigation.

Practical implications

Practical lessons include a challenge to the view that there is a “right” and correct formula to engage in business relationships and the route to relationship success. Practical reality and human nature determine that even incrementally successful relationships can break down, and gains can be quickly reversed.

Originality/value

This paper takes the important theme of business relationships and underpins it with a novel treatment: the use of song lyrics, in order to highlight that prior and somewhat formulaic templates for business success are not always appropriate; and business relationships are governed by a human factor that is not always positive in outlook.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Cleopatra Veloutsou and Francisco Guzmán

525

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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