Search results

1 – 10 of 276
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Kun‐ho Lee and Shakir Ullah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the different motivational factors that lead to customers' Islamic bank selection decision in Pakistan. In particular, it aims to…

4106

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the different motivational factors that lead to customers' Islamic bank selection decision in Pakistan. In particular, it aims to look into the importance of Shari'a compliance for Islamic banks' customers and thereby the potential risk of deposits withdrawal in case of violations of Shari'a principles.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents descriptive statistics and cross‐tabulation analysis based on data collected from 357 customers.

Findings

The findings reveal that Islamic banks' customers highly value Shari'a compliance in their banks and that non‐compliance with Shari'a principles leads to disgruntled customers. An interesting pronouncement is that if an Islamic bank is involved in repeated violations of Shari'a, the customers are inclined to switch their banks. Nonetheless, the findings reveal that Shari'a compliance is not the only satisfaction yardstick for Islamic banks' customers; they also expect their banks to be convenient, technologically advanced and provide security of their capital.

Practical implications

The paper has profound implications for Islamic financial institutions operating in Pakistan. Although Shari'a compliance is the most important factor that Islamic banks need to observe, they also need to be competitive with conventional banks.

Originality/value

The paper is a unique contribution to Islamic banks' selection criteria where the importance of Shari'a compliance and conventional bank patronage factors has been explored. The paper's has practical implications for Islamic banks' owners and regulators.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2020

Nurul Ain Shahar, Anuar Nawawi and Ahmad Saiful Azlin Puteh Salin

This paper aims to examine the extent of the Shari’a corporate governance disclosure in the annual report of Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) in Malaysia to determine…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the extent of the Shari’a corporate governance disclosure in the annual report of Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) in Malaysia to determine the significant differences in this disclosure between the local and foreign-owned IFIs, small and large size IFIs and IFIs belong to Islamic and conventional holding companies.

Design/methodology/approach

All 16 IFIs in Malaysia were selected to analyse the extent of disclosure in their annual reports on issues related to Shari’a corporate governance. For this purpose, an index of Shari’a corporate governance disclosure for IFIs was created based on adapting Sulaiman et al. (2015). The index consists of 127 items classified into 14 dimensions. The scoring of the disclosed items is binary, where a score of “1” if disclosed and “0” if it was not disclosed in the annual report.

Findings

The result shows no significant differences in the Shari’a corporate governance disclosure between the local and foreign-owned IFIs, small and large size IFIs and IFIs belonging to Islamic and conventional holding companies. However, further examination shows that there was a significant difference in the disclosure of the risk management committee dimension between the large and small IFIs and investment account holders dimension between the conventional and Islamic holding companies.

Research limitations/implications

The results provide new emerging evidence that deviates from many prior empirical research studies, which document the domination of Islamic-based IFIs in the corporate governance practices, as compared with their conventional financial institutions that venture into Islamic finance. This study, however, was conducted on only 16 IFIs in a one-year period, i.e. 2013. Future research should consider data from a larger number of IFIs that involve a number of countries with more than one year of data to have a better understanding of the extent of Shari’a corporate governance disclosure.

Practical implications

This study provides an indicator to the stakeholders of Islamic finance that the Islamic-based IFIs and conventional IFIs are equal and cannot be differentiated based on the Shari’a corporate governance disclosure. For Islamic-based IFIs, as a pioneer in Islamic banking and finance industry, they need to take more efforts in adopting the Shari’a governance framework issued by the Central Bank of Malaysia (BNM), namely, the Shari’a review, audit and risk management.

Originality/value

This study is original, as it includes the latest requirements by the Shari’a governance framework issued by the BNM, namely, the Shari’a review, audit, risk management and research functions in its research instrument. In addition, this research also scrutinised the disclosure in detail of all the dimensions constructed in the governance index.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2010

Ruzita Abdul Rahim and Othman Yong

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the initial return patterns of Malaysian initial public offerings (IPOs) and whether shari'a‐compliant status would alter such patterns.

2042

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the initial return patterns of Malaysian initial public offerings (IPOs) and whether shari'a‐compliant status would alter such patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

The effect of shari'a‐compliant status on the patterns of initial return of IPOs is analyzed using a sample of 386 IPOs issued between January 1999 and December 2007.

Findings

The preliminary results indicate that over the study period, the initial returns of Malaysian IPOs drop substantially from 94.91 percent reported from the pre‐crisis period of 1990‐1998 to 31.99 percent, a level more comparable to that reported in advanced markets. Since the initial returns do not revert to pre‐crisis levels, the new low IPO underpricing trend is more likely to be associated with the removal of pricing restraints. The results of regression analyses on the full sample, however, suggest that there is no drastic change with respect to factors that drive initial returns in Malaysian IPOs. With regards to shari'a‐compliant status, IPOs of this subsample show similar profiles to those of non‐shari'a counterparts. However, other than demand, the two subsamples are driven by different factors. Initial returns of shari'a‐compliant IPOs are driven by the size and type of offers, whereas those of the non‐shari'a IPOs are driven by risks.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should re‐examine the issue by taking into consideration the extensiveness of a firm's compliance to shari'a rules and other predictor variables.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to examine the effect of shari'a‐compliant status on the performance of IPOs.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Racha Ghayad

The purpose of this paper is to study the operation of Islamic banks and the elements which determine their performance.

5566

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the operation of Islamic banks and the elements which determine their performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to ensure the respect of Shari’a, religious committee of monitoring exists within the Islamic bank to take care of the conformity of the activities and banking products with the Shari’a. This paper supposes that corporate governance of Islamic banks imposes an important constraint on Islamic banks operations. Furthermore, the directors of the Islamic banks are subjected to the governorship exerted by the board of directors and the Shari’a board.

Findings

The findings of this paper are that the performance of an Islamic bank – as a company based on principles of Islam – is affected not only by the internal variables of quantitative nature (for example financial ratios) but also by the internal qualitative variables like the managerial variables. Moreover, the performance of an Islamic bank and a conventional bank should not be measured in the same way because of their divergence on the level of the objectives. The Shari’a member must have a qualification in finance and commerce to ensure better quality of supervision and consultation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this paper are based on case studies from one country only (Bahrain).

Practical implications

This paper implies that in practice, members of Shari’a Board must have stature to give the bank credibility vis‐à‐vis the stakeholders and the depositors.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is that it shows that the members of Shari’a board were a serious handicap for the directors of the Islamic banks. Directors and members of Shari’a board did not speak the same language. The members of the Shari’a board were not very specialized in the fields other than Shari’a and contrary the directors in Shari’a.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Ameenullah Aman

To wipe out the criticism of being a replica of conventional financial institution, Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) need to comply with Islamic principles not only…

Abstract

Purpose

To wipe out the criticism of being a replica of conventional financial institution, Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) need to comply with Islamic principles not only on financial side but also while branding and marketing their products and services. This will bring the coherence between their overall market image and core business activities. This paper aims to discuss in detail the Islamic marketing traits relevant to the IFIs for positioning and offering their products.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows the research design based on reviewing existing sources of Qura’an and Hadith, the secondary research literature on this novel topic and substantial intellectual discourse with the field experts.

Findings

It is criticized that IFIs lack the spirit of Islamic values for marketing and branding a commercial business entity. Therefore, this paper outline the differences between Islamic and conventional marketing. Also, it contributes to explain the traits of Islamic marketing mix relevant to the IFIs based on Islamic established principles.

Research limitations/implications

This study gives valuable practical guidelines for the marketing policymakers of Islamic financial institutions. Islamic marketing mix; product, price, place and promotion, related strategies can be designed and branded keeping the true spirit of Islamic marketing values intact.

Practical implications

This study is practically important for Islamic financial intuitions to sustain their “Islamic” image by making sure of Islamic principles in their product development, pricing, promotions and distribution.

Social implications

The socioeconomic system is the brand of Islamic economics and finance. IFIs being the stakeholders of this brand can contribute to the well-being of the society by enhancing their acceptability with the help of divine image and operations.

Originality/value

Literature on practical Islamic marketing approach in particular to the IFIs is very limited. This study gives comprehensive findings on all the major aspects of marketing based on Islamic values for Islamic financial institutions.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 April 2010

Mervyn K. Lewis

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and structure of Islamic investment funds and evaluate their governance.

4301

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and structure of Islamic investment funds and evaluate their governance.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology employed is the conceptual framework of Islamic economics.

Findings

It is found that Islamic investment funds have grown rapidly this decade: in Malaysia alone, the number of shari'a‐compliant funds has grown from 17 in 2000 to 149 in 2008, and at a global level there are 650 funds in operation. However, the industry has developed in a particular way, by focusing on negative screens, and removing from investments those activities deemed to be unacceptable to Islamic precepts, rather than pursuing as well the implementation of other aspects of the Islamic ethos.

Originality/value

The conclusion reached is that, if the Islamic investment fund industry is to provide more completely for the religious and financial aspirations of investors, it needs to go beyond the negatives and to also accentuate the positive and, drawing upon Islamic governance guidelines, actively seek out investments that have a positive impact on society and the environment and promote the welfare of the community. These issues hitherto have been largely unexplored.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Samy Nathan and Vincent Ribière

The purpose of this paper is to define and explore the concepts and relationships between intellectual capital, knowledge, wisdom and corporate responsibility in the

3620

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define and explore the concepts and relationships between intellectual capital, knowledge, wisdom and corporate responsibility in the context of the corporate governance of Islamic financial institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an adaptation of the Nicholson and Kiel intellectual capital model of the board of directors including the role of the Shari'a Supervisory Board (SSB). It is driven by the following research questions: how does the SSB add value to the corporate governance model of IFIs through their intellectual capital? Is there any value in replicating the IFIs structure in western conventional banks and, if yes, how could it be done without the religious and cultural impacts?

Findings

It was only recently that one entered the knowledge economic era and organizations are slowly realizing the need and the benefits not only of managing knowledge better, but also of managing it in a wiser way. The concepts and values carried by Islamic banking and by social responsible investments have a lot in common and they both tend to bring wisdom to the organization's operations and goals.

Originality/value

This paper explores how the core concepts of Islamic banking governance could be adapted to conventional banking. It shows the need for organizations to continue their knowledge management journey by integrating organizational wisdom with their decisions and actions. Corporate social responsibility is perceived as being a first step to reach organizational wisdom. This paper touches on various critical issues and it is hoped that it will be a source of inspiration for numerous research questions and debates on these topics.

Details

VINE, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Mejda Bahlous and Rosylin Mohd. Yusof

The purpose of this paper is to assess the benefits to investors of international diversification among only Islamic funds. Compared to conventional investors who are not…

1355

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the benefits to investors of international diversification among only Islamic funds. Compared to conventional investors who are not restricted in their choice of funds, Islamic investors are restricted to investing in shari’a-compliant funds, thus giving up some diversification benefits. The possibility of international diversification among only Islamic funds may thus help Islamic investors to invest in accordance to their religious beliefs and still benefit from diversification.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper assesses the benefits of diversification by analyzing the extent of co-integration among four regional Islamic funds and by estimating the short-term and long-term structural dynamics of and among these funds. The paper uses an Autoregressive-Distributed Lag (ARDL) approach to testing the long-run relationships among these funds and use variance decomposition and impulse response functions to examine the structural dynamics of the relationship between these funds. These methods can also be used for predictive purposes and represent, in authors opinion, a useful approach that complements the traditional methodology of static covariance matrix to find the efficient frontier at a given moment in time.

Findings

The results indicate that international diversification can help reduce risk if Asia Pacific Islamic funds and MENA region Islamic funds are invested contemporaneously and/or Asia Pacific Islamic funds and North America Islamic funds, and/or Europe funds and MENA funds. The paper also finds that investors would benefit from investing in North American funds and MENA funds both in the long run and in the short run. Conversely, the paper finds that Europe funds and North American funds are co-integrated in the long-run precluding the opportunity for substantial diversification benefits from these particular portfolio mixes.

Research limitations/implications

The long-run analysis helps passive fund managers and investors in composing their portfolio by providing evidence that some portfolio mixes of different regional Islamic funds lead to better risk return performance than one regional Islamic fund portfolios. The short-run analysis however helps the active fund managers and investors as it suggests that diversifying in the short run and reviewing their portfolio on a regular basis would be beneficial as well.

Originality/value

This analysis justifies the promotion of Islamic finance as the negative correlation between several Islamic funds across the regions studied suggests better opportunities of investments via international diversification making Islamic funds more desirable.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

M. Kabir Hassan

493

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Samy Nathan Garas and Chris Pierce

The governance structure of Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) implements Islamic canon law (Shari'a) into business transactions through Shari'a supervision processes…

3108

Abstract

Purpose

The governance structure of Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) implements Islamic canon law (Shari'a) into business transactions through Shari'a supervision processes. This paper aims to define Shari'a supervision and examine Shari'a supervisory councils (both within and outside the Central Bank), Shari'a consulting firms, Shari'a advisors, and Shari'a Supervisory Boards (SSB). It also discusses the importance of the hierarchical position of SSBs and evaluates their objectives and functions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews a wide range of theoretical literatures especially recent proceedings of relevant conferences in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries along with the standards of the Accounting and Auditing Organization of Islamic Financial Institutions (AAOIFI). A framework for understanding the role of the SSB is developed suggesting a set of objectives and functions for the SSB.

Findings

The paper finds a lack of standardization among the IFIs concerning the position of the SSB within the corporate hierarchy. Moreover, the SSB is found to control the IFIs activities more than the other types of Shari'a supervision such as Shari'a consulting firms and Shari'a advisors.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses exclusively on the GCC countries and excludes the other Middle East and Far East countries where Shari'a supervision might have different forms.

Social implications

The research provides guidelines for IFIs in defining the SSB role in their governance structure and recommends the SSB among the other forms of Shari'a supervision (Shari'a consulting firms and Shari'a advisors) in controlling the IFIs activities.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature gap about the governance of IFIs. It is one of the first studies that provide a conceptual foundation for the SSB role in the governance structure of IFIs.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

1 – 10 of 276