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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Liz Meadon

The BAT (UK and Export) teacher secondment programme is reviewed,the advantages of an industry placement for teachers are listed and thehurdles which need to be overcome…

Abstract

The BAT (UK and Export) teacher secondment programme is reviewed, the advantages of an industry placement for teachers are listed and the hurdles which need to be overcome to continue the programme are considered.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2011

David Porteous

This article presents and discusses the findings from an evaluation of the secondment of two Polish police officers to work with the Metropolitan Police Service in a west…

Abstract

This article presents and discusses the findings from an evaluation of the secondment of two Polish police officers to work with the Metropolitan Police Service in a west London borough between October and December 2009. While the secondment was intended to improve the service provided to the local Polish community, the principal outcome was more effective information‐sharing concerning Polish offenders. ‘Cop culture’ in this context had more resonance than national culture. British and Polish officers soon found they could overcome apparent differences in their approach to the ‘job’. Overcoming residents' reluctance to engage with the police proved more problematic.

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Safer Communities, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Joy I. Greig

Describes different types of secondment in quality assurance. Addressesthe social and occupational characteristics of the associated roles.Demonstrates that the benefits…

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480

Abstract

Describes different types of secondment in quality assurance. Addresses the social and occupational characteristics of the associated roles. Demonstrates that the benefits of secondment outweigh the limitations. Suggests that changes in the health care system are providing continuous scope for secondment and that this, therefore, should be taken advantage of.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

Marigold Cleeve

Secondment can be a major turning point in a librarian′s careerdevelopment and a cost‐effective method of management training. It isessential that a secondment can be…

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411

Abstract

Secondment can be a major turning point in a librarian′s career development and a cost‐effective method of management training. It is essential that a secondment can be properly planned by the host organization and the home library. The author′s experience on a secondment as a liaison officer with the Library Association team at IFLA 1987 is described, and the effect it had on career progression noted.

Details

Librarian Career Development, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-0810

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

Beryl Morris

Provides support and information for those who might be interestedin going on secondment or encouraging it in their organizations.Includes practical details which need to…

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403

Abstract

Provides support and information for those who might be interested in going on secondment or encouraging it in their organizations. Includes practical details which need to be considered and concludes with a shortlist of information and organizations which can provide further details.

Details

Librarian Career Development, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-0810

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Wilson Longden

An extract from a guide for tutors in Further Education Colleges ispresented. The guide was produced as a result of a research project onbehalf of the RSA′s Education for…

Abstract

An extract from a guide for tutors in Further Education Colleges is presented. The guide was produced as a result of a research project on behalf of the RSA′s Education for Capability Project, sponsored by the work‐related Further Education Development Fund of the Training Agency. Nine points of guidance are detailed in order to make the best of the opportunities which occur during the placement.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Derrick Ahlfeldt and Jennifer Cramb

Describes the challenges faced by Visa Europe's leadership‐development program (LDP) in its fifth year and the approaches Visa Europe has taken to keep the program fresh

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1732

Abstract

Purpose

Describes the challenges faced by Visa Europe's leadership‐development program (LDP) in its fifth year and the approaches Visa Europe has taken to keep the program fresh, and to accelerate the development of a coaching culture in the business – one of the original objectives for the program.

Design/methodology/approach

Details how short‐term secondments have been introduced to get participants into a part of the business that differs from their own, and the challenges that have had to be overcome to make the secondments work well. Highlights the roles of IMD, for the business‐school program, and Stellar Consulting Ltd, for one‐to‐one development coaching.

Findings

Reveals that building the coaching skills of a key group of LDP alumni has helped to accelerate the growth of a coaching culture. The program has linked people in a web of internal networks, and helped to break down organization silos because participants appreciate the challenges faced by other functional areas. Individuals are stretched, challenged, and moved out of their comfort zone and into their development zone. The program helps to identify and develop the best people and helps Visa Europe to retain them. The project element of the LDP has helped to ensure the successful delivery of some key business projects.

Practical implications

Examines how Visa Europe will be looking at the next phase of the development of LDP alumni, and considering them as a key part of the talent pool for the future of the business.

Originality/value

Shows that, after five years, Visa Europe has the advantage of a substantial alumni group who have a positive impact on the fabric of the organization.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Rolando M. Tomasini

Humanitarian disasters strike overnight causing urgent demands for assistance in complex environments. Attending to the needs of the beneficiaries requires highly trained…

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354

Abstract

Purpose

Humanitarian disasters strike overnight causing urgent demands for assistance in complex environments. Attending to the needs of the beneficiaries requires highly trained and knowledgeable staff. However, humanitarian agencies can neither afford, nor keep on standby full‐time staff with a wide range of knowledge and expertise to meet all possible needs. Some agencies have gained access to additional trained staff through partnership agreements with the private sector. These secondments augment the capacity of humanitarian agencies placing corporate managers in a different setting where they can test their knowledge and skills. The purpose of this paper is to provide arguments to build a business case for corporate managers to be seconded to humanitarian relief operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses case study research and academic literature.

Findings

The paper provides a list of the managerial roles of humanitarian logisticians to identify the learning opportunities available to seconded staff operating in disaster relief operations. The list of roles may be considered learning opportunities for corporate managers in a different context and setting.

Social implications

The paper shows that there is a possibility to augment the response capacity of humanitarian agencies with corporate managers during a disaster.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on the value of learning during emergency operations for corporate managers.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1969

R. Sweeney

This is a record of work undertaken during a two‐month secondment to the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment (AWRE) Library, Aldermaston from 10th June to 31st July…

Abstract

This is a record of work undertaken during a two‐month secondment to the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment (AWRE) Library, Aldermaston from 10th June to 31st July 1968. The purpose of the secondment was:

Details

Program, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1979

Nancy Foy

Various scenarios for the eighties give remarkably coherent pictures of the environment in which companies will operate, especially with respect to the kinds of managers…

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78

Abstract

Various scenarios for the eighties give remarkably coherent pictures of the environment in which companies will operate, especially with respect to the kinds of managers that will be needed. One finds increasingly familiar descriptions of smaller work elements and rising unemployment, of more demanding employees, of intervention from outside in the form of government control, consumerism, community demands, union demands—and an increased ethos of social responsibility in business. These consistent pictures of the eighties have important implications for the future of management. Industry will need faster, more flexible responses. So will other kinds of organisations, related to the public sector. This, in turn, demands organisations able to adapt themselves to their environment more easily than most can demonstrate today. The individual manager in this environment will be valued not for his techniques or specific knowhow so much as for his breadth, his ability to project pictures of forests as well as trees, and his ability to deal with a wide variety of constituencies. He will have to listen as much as he talks, using a variety of vocabularies. He will have to be equipped to bridge boundaries both inside the organisation and to outsiders. Some of the most difficult boundaries to cross in today's organisations tend to be those nearest to home—the boundaries between faculties or disciplines in a university, for example, or between functions in a company. I believe the problems inherent in these scenarios for the eighties are actually opportunities for management education. If companies will need managers who can cross boundaries, this presents an opportunity for external management education institutions to act as agents for change, as catalysts, taking early initiatives rather than reacting with “products” after problems emerge. In short, management education could be helping managers learn how to bridge the important boundaries, as well as bringing together people from different places who have similar problems, opportunities or interests. If this is the role management educators recognise and accept for the eighties, they will need to develop and exercise boundary‐crossing skills within the often difficult environments in which they operate. Standing at the boundary between the industrial culture and the academic culture, each management centre or business school has to define its own objectives. For what purpose do they exist? Is it to improve the nation's economy; to improve corporate management; to develop group skills; to develop individual managers; to educate; or train managers; to develop management teachers and researchers; to extend current “best practice” to a wider audience; to develop new approaches; to achieve professional or academic standing? Objectives need not be mutually exclusive, nor even ranked too firmly. But mismatches have been observed between professed objectives and observed behaviour. The situation for the trainer inside a company is often analogous; he, too, stands at the boundary between the culture of his company and the demands of the academic world, and must reconcile often conflicting objectives

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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