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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Mildred L. Burns, Diana Patterson and Leo LaFrance

Based on the proposition that “per pupil per hour” is aviable unit for analysing both costs and benefits of education. It isproposed that “per pupil per hour” is a unit on…

Abstract

Based on the proposition that “per pupil per hour” is a viable unit for analysing both costs and benefits of education. It is proposed that “per pupil per hour” is a unit on which programmes can be analysed and tracked across terms or years to give trend data. Such trend data can provide better information on which educational decisions can be based. “Benefits” are defined as percentages of students who achieved an expected level of accomplishment set by principals prior to the start of the study. Whatever the basis of expected success, it is proposed that standards set at the school level in harmony with the real situation can provide the most relevant data for programme analysis. Results from this case study reveal that on a “per pupil per hour” basis, education is perhaps the best bargain that the public gets.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Page A. Smith and W. Sean Kearney

The purpose of this study is to examine the relative impact of achievement press on student success in elementary schools in the Southwestern USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relative impact of achievement press on student success in elementary schools in the Southwestern USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from individual teacher assessments and student achievement tests are collected and aggregated at the campus level. Hierarchical linear modeling is utilized to calculate the Intra Class Correlation (ICC), then campus level scores for achievement press (along with control variables) are regressed on school success indicators in order to determine the relative impact of achievement press on various levels of school attainment.

Findings

The results of these analyses demonstrate that achievement press made a statistically significant independent contribution to school success, both near term (one year) and longitudinally (over three years).

Research limitations/implications

Via the use of a reliable and valid diagnostic tool, this investigation adds to the extant literature on school climate, achievement, and school effectiveness.

Practical implications

This study provides important information for educational leaders interested in improving both school climate and student achievement. Practical concerns about socioeconomic status and administrator longevity are also addressed.

Originality/value

This research validates the usefulness of achievement press as a concise multi‐level school climate measure. To that end, this study both demonstrates that achievement press makes an impact on school level success and adds to a growing body of literature connecting specific campus climate variables directly to student achievement.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Fatih Töremen, Abdurrahman Ekinci and Mehmet Karakuş

The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the influence of empathic skills of managers on the success of schools.

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Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the influence of empathic skills of managers on the success of schools.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, survey based descriptive scanning model was used. This study was fulfilled in Batman city on teachers working at public and private primary schools in 2003‐2004 education year. According to the results of the central evaluation examination, schools were divided into three success groups (each group having seven schools). About 10 teachers were randomly selected from each of these schools, and then the 23 itemed questionnaire was administered.

Findings

As a result of the research it was seen that empathic skills of managers and school success had a very close relationship. There were meaningful differences between the first group and the other two groups. Successful schools' managers clearly had better empathic skills and unsuccessful schools' managers had little empathic skills. The same situation was seen between the second group and the third group as well.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this research may be affected by local conditions in which it was conducted.

Practical implications

The empathic skills which are revealed as important indicators of success should be taken into consideration during the selection and training of managers.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the empathic aspect of school management which has been rarely taken up and displays the importance of empathic skills on school success.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 59 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Shameka Powell

This chapter details how local racial contexts and educators’ readings of those contexts shape actions they took in sponsoring Black students. Sponsorship was understood…

Abstract

This chapter details how local racial contexts and educators’ readings of those contexts shape actions they took in sponsoring Black students. Sponsorship was understood as the process in which agents provide, stymie, and/or enhance access to valued resources. The author utilized data collected during a yearlong ethnography of two high schools – one urban and the other suburban – both within a metropolitan Midwestern city. Findings from the study highlighted that teachers’ involvement in sponsorship was shaped by how they understood local racial disparities and contrasting views of equality. First, teachers noted residential segregation patterns as evidence of past and present manifestations of systemic racism that disadvantaged Black students. Second, they relied on their knowledge of racialized educational disparities to shape equitable actions. Third, teachers employed a restrictive equality approach to argue that access to high-performing schools was enough for some Black students in order to neglect modifying assignments. The need exists for researchers to examine complexities of sponsorship and how racism (re)shapes actions sponsors take toward fostering Black student academic success. Additionally, it is important for teachers to deepen their understanding of systemic racism and its manifestations within particular localities.

Details

New Directions in Educational Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-623-2

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2013

Rhonda G. Craven and Anthony Dillon

This chapter critically analyses the current participation of Indigenous Australian students in higher education and identifies new directions for seeding success and…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter critically analyses the current participation of Indigenous Australian students in higher education and identifies new directions for seeding success and enabling Indigenous students to flourish in higher education contexts.

Methodology

Statistical reports, government reports and the scholarly literature were analysed to elucidate the nature of participation of Indigenous students in higher education, identify strategies that are succeeding, identify issues that need addressing and explicate potentially potent ways forward.

Findings

The findings have important implications for theory, research and practice. The results of this study demonstrate, that while increasing numbers of Indigenous Australian students are accessing higher education, they still are not participating at a rate commensurate with their representation in the Australian population. The findings also suggest new ways to enable Indigenous Australians to not only succeed in higher education, but flourish.

Research implications

The findings imply that more needs to be done to seed success in increasing the numbers of Indigenous Australian students in higher education to be representative of the population and ensuring participation in higher education enables Indigenous students to succeed and flourish. The findings also imply that there is a dire need for further research to identify key drivers of success.

Implications

The study supports the need for increasing the number of Indigenous Australians participating in higher education and enhancing higher education strategies to enable Indigenous students to succeed and flourish.

Social implications

Enhancing the participation of Indigenous students in higher education internationally can help to contribute to the well-being of individuals, Indigenous communities and nations.

Originality/value

This chapter provides an up to date analysis of the nature of Indigenous Australian participation in higher education and identifies potentially potent new ways forward to seed success that have international implications.

Details

Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6

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Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2006

Hella Bel Hadj Amor, Amy Ellen Schwartz and Leanna Stiefel

We examine variation in high school and college outcomes across New York City public high schools. Using data on 80,000 students who entered high school in 1998 and…

Abstract

We examine variation in high school and college outcomes across New York City public high schools. Using data on 80,000 students who entered high school in 1998 and following them into the City University of New York, we investigate whether schools that produce successful high school students also produce successful college students. We also explore differences in performance across sex, race, and immigration, and we briefly explore selection issues. Specifically, we estimate student-level regressions with school fixed effects, controlling for student characteristics, to identify better and worse performing schools based on state mandated exams, graduation, and college performance.

Details

Improving School Accountability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-446-1

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Chen Schechter

This article aims to reinterpret principal preparatory programs to also include the collective learning‐from‐success process (success‐based learning), thus providing a…

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2060

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to reinterpret principal preparatory programs to also include the collective learning‐from‐success process (success‐based learning), thus providing a complementary instructional framework on how to prepare principals for today's public school reality.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion reviews the core leadership capacities for today's and tomorrow's principalship and the need to rethink principal preparatory programs accordingly. The interrelationship between problems and learning is described, coupled with the possibilities and limitations of problem‐based learning. Success‐based learning is then described, enumerating its potentials and pitfalls.

Findings

The paper finds that focusing on both learning from problems and learning from successes in leadership education may better develop prospective principals' leadership capacities necessary to lead schools in a dynamic environment.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the need to conceptualize and empirically investigate problem‐based learning and success‐based learning as interrelated instructional frameworks that are both necessary to develop effective future leaders.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Brandy C. Sirchia Huguet

The purpose of this paper is to review literature about effective leadership’s impact on school performance, as a basis for schools to focus on, to encourage similar…

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2038

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review literature about effective leadership’s impact on school performance, as a basis for schools to focus on, to encourage similar results in like school settings. Educational professionals are commissioned with the extraordinary task of instructing students with the acquisition of knowledge that will serve them in all future endeavors. In recent years, education has come under attack and has been scrutinized with the implementation accountability measures, in the form of standardized testing, to produce increased success in populations that have previously been underachieving.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach to compiling this literature was reflective in nature with identification of effective leadership attributes on school performance.

Findings

Many schools have used various strategies that have had positive impacts on student achievement. To enhance student achievement, the schools’ leadership should be trustworthy administrators who encourage collaboration and teacher leadership, as well as employment of educators who are genuinely passionate about teaching and love children. Examination of characteristics leading to school success may serve as a foundation for other schools.

Originality/value

The value of this review of literature is the compilation of numerous studies highlighting effective school leadership and structures used to impact student achievement.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2021

Rose M. Ylimaki, Stephen Jacobson, Lauri Johnson, Hans W. Klar, Juan Nino, Margaret Terry Orr and Samantha Scribner

In this paper, the authors recap the history and evolution of ISSPP research in the USA with research teams that grew from one location in 2002 to seven teams at present…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors recap the history and evolution of ISSPP research in the USA with research teams that grew from one location in 2002 to seven teams at present. The authors also examine the unique context of public education in America by describing its governance, key policies and funding as well as increasing student diversity due to changing internal student demographics and global population migrations. In particular, the authors describe how decentralization in American public education that has led to long-standing systemic inequities in school resource allocations and subsequently to marked gaps in performance outcomes for children from poor communities, especially for those of color. These existing inequities were the reason the USA research team was the only national ISSPP team from the original network of eight countries that choose to study exclusively leadership in challenging, high needs schools that performed beyond expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors describe the common multi-case case study methodology (Merriam, 1988) and interview protocols employed in order to gather multiple perspectives on school success in high-needs communities and the principal's contribution to that success. Leithwood and Riehl's (2005) framework of core leadership practices for successful school leadership was used to analyze our data across all cases.

Findings

The authors present key findings from cases across the USA and synthesize common trends across these findings.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conclude the paper with a discussion of their overarching impressions from almost two decades of study, the importance of national and local context in examining school leadership and, lastly, suggestions for future research.

Originality/value

This article contributes to findings from the longest and largest international network on successful leadership.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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