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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Satyendra C. Pandey and Pinaki Nandan Pattnaik

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Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2018

Satyendra C. Pandey, Pinaki Nandan Pattnaik and Praveen M.

This paper describes the action learning experiment by the name Follow a Founder of a leading university in India. The purpose of the paper is to reflect on the key takeaways that…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the action learning experiment by the name Follow a Founder of a leading university in India. The purpose of the paper is to reflect on the key takeaways that can be drawn from such an action learning experiment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a case study, authors’ experience of leading and conceptualizing the program coupled with interviews of multiple stakeholders, which formed the sources of data.

Findings

The paper suggests the possibility of implementing such a program at other business schools and universities, provided there is a clear mapping of tasks and objectives and learners are given exposure to real time workplace scenarios.

Originality/value

The paper describes a one of its kind experiment at an Indian university when it comes to applying action learning in a taught program.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 23 May 2023

Pratik Modi, Satyendra C. Pandey and Bikramjit Rishi

The learning outcomes of this study are as follows:▪ to bring the appreciation of the complexities involved in managing a mission-driven not-for-profit (NPO) institution;▪ to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this study are as follows:

▪ to bring the appreciation of the complexities involved in managing a mission-driven not-for-profit (NPO) institution;

▪ to highlight the pressures and tensions felt by a mission-driven not-for-profit organization from various stakeholders; and

▪ to appreciate the managerial challenge involved in making a not-for-profit organization financially sustainable while meeting its mission objectives.

Case overview/synopsis

The National Institute of Development Management (NIDM), established in 1980 by a group of development professionals, was a mission-driven high-performing knowledge institution focused on professionalizing the management of people’s institutions. From one long-term academic program in 1980 to three in 2019, NIDM came a long way in its journey. For the first five years, the institute offered a stipend to its students in the PGDM-DM program and placed them in village-based organizations. The next 15 years saw a general shift in attention toward the development sector, and NIDM started placing its students in other organizations beyond village-based development organizations. NIDM supported all its activities through funds generated on its own from program fees charged to the students, consulting and training activities. Prof. Sengupta, the Director, faced multiple challenges. He needed to decide what action he could take to keep the 40-year-old institution financially sustainable while remaining committed to the mission of its founders.

Complexity academic level

This case can be used in courses such a Managing Not-for-Profit Organizations and Management of Dual-Purpose Organizations. The case can be taught to the students of management, development management or agribusiness management programs. This case is also suitable for the faculty development programs participants to bring about the appreciation of managing an institution of higher education. The case requires about 70–90 min of class discussion time.

Supplementary material

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Swati Panda and Satyendra C. Pandey

The purpose of the paper is to explore various motivations that influence college students to spend more time binge watching and the subsequent gratifications. Video streaming…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore various motivations that influence college students to spend more time binge watching and the subsequent gratifications. Video streaming websites such as Netflix and Amazon Video have changed the viewing habits of consumers. Viewers have more control and can enjoy on-demand content as per their convenience. This has resulted in viewers watching multiple episodes of television shows in a compressed time frame – a phenomenon termed as binge watching. College students engage in binge watching because of the various gratifications that it promises. This paper investigates the various triggers and consequences of binge watching.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a mixed method approach. The first stage involved qualitative interviews and focused group discussions with college students to understand the phenomenon of binge watching. The second stage involved administering a questionnaire to address our research question.

Findings

Findings indicate that social interaction, escape from reality, easy accessibility to TV content and advertising motivate college students to spend more time binge watching. If students are negatively gratified after binge watching, then they intend to spend more time doing it.

Originality/value

The findings have important implications on the overall wellbeing of college students and strategic implications for video streaming companies.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2022

Sajani Thapa, Satyendra C. Pandey, Swati Panda, Audhesh K. Paswan and Ashish Ghimire

Vaping has become a prominent public health problem that has impacted young adults. The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the effects of different intrinsic and…

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Abstract

Purpose

Vaping has become a prominent public health problem that has impacted young adults. The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the effects of different intrinsic and extrinsic motivations on young adults’ realization of excessive vaping and their intention to quit vaping.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was used to collect data from 232 young vapers (primarily Generation Z and Millennials) to test the hypothesized relationships using a covariance-based structural equation model.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that “realization of excessive vaping” is negatively associated with “sensation seeking” and positively associated with “deal proneness,” “environmental cues” and “negative repercussion.” The “intention to quit vaping” is negatively associated with “marketing cues” and positively associated with “alternative to smoking” and “environmental cues.” Finally, the “realization of excessive vaping” is positively associated with “intention to quit vaping.”

Originality/value

This study takes a two-dimensional approach to understand the complex motivations behind a relatively new addictive behavior – vaping. It contributes to the literature of addictive behavior, social cognitive theory and theory of planned behavior. Further, it has important implications for public policy and the marketing of addictive products to youths.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Satyendra C. Pandey

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 December 2017

Satyendra C. Pandey, Andrew Dutta and Amar KJR Nayak

The aim of this paper is to understand the role of organizational capabilities in knowledge management (KM) success pattern and how KM initiatives can be designed for…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to understand the role of organizational capabilities in knowledge management (KM) success pattern and how KM initiatives can be designed for organizational success.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted a qualitative, descriptive case study research design to study the complex contextual issue of organizational capabilities and its role in KM success of information technology companies.

Findings

Findings of the study indicate that success of KM is not only bound by its processes but also by key infrastructure which can either promote or inhibit KM. To realize KM success, infrastructure capabilities have to be supported by knowledge process capabilities and vice versa.

Research limitations/implications

Future research can continue to examine organizational capabilities from the perspective of teams or business units in contrast to the organization.

Originality/value

This paper adds valuable empirical insights from Indian standpoint to the existing KM literature concerning preconditions of success and failure of KM initiatives in companies.

Case study
Publication date: 7 February 2024

Pinaki Nandan Pattnaik, Satyendra C. Pandey and Bignya Patnaik

After completion of this case study, students will be able to help participants appreciate how the personal experiences of the founder(s) shape the inception of a social venture…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

After completion of this case study, students will be able to help participants appreciate how the personal experiences of the founder(s) shape the inception of a social venture and impact its ongoing evolution; elucidate the intricacies and challenges inherent in managing a mission-driven organization dedicated to serving the underserved segments of society; emphasize the difficulties associated with exploring opportunities for scaling up a social venture; and facilitate comprehension of the various options and strategies available for achieving scalability.

Case overview/synopsis

The Kalinga Institute of Social Sciences (KISS), founded in 1992–1993 by Prof. Achyuta Samanta in Bhubaneswar, was a pioneering institution with a distinctive focus on providing high-quality education at all levels, exclusively to tribal students. From its inception, KISS remained unwavering in its commitment to the holistic development of marginalized tribal communities. It offered not just free education but also comprehensive support, including accommodation, food and health care, to thousands of students spanning from kindergarten to post-graduation levels. Remarkably, KISS held the unique distinction of being the world’s only university dedicated to tribal education. Over the years, KISS witnessed remarkable growth, evolving from a modest 125 students in 1992–1993 to a thriving community of 30,000 students. Its success garnered attention from federal and state governments, public institutions, philanthropists and corporations, all intrigued by the prospect of replicating its transformative model in diverse regions of the country. KISS even received invitations to establish similar campuses in neighbouring countries such as Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Nepal. What set KISS apart was its self-sustaining approach. While it did receive support from like-minded organizations and government schemes, it operated without charging any fees to its students. This ethos posed a unique challenge for Samanta: determining the nature and extent of support and resources required should KISS choose to expand its impact beyond its current boundaries.

Complexity academic level

This case study is suited for inclusion in courses pertaining to social innovation and non-profit management, particularly in modules around the theme of scaling social innovation. It provides an illustration of the growth trajectory of social innovation-oriented ventures and the key factors underlining their success and sustainability. Furthermore, this case study delves into the inherent tensions that often emerge during the process of scaling up such initiatives.

In addition to the MBA-level courses, this case study can also be used as a resource for executive education programs with a specific focus on social purpose organizations and those dedicated to fostering partnerships in pursuit of social goals. It offers insights into the dynamics of these organizations and their collaborative efforts towards achieving social impact.

To effectively explore and analyse the case material, instructors should allocate approximately 70–90 min of class discussion time.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2023

Satyendra C. Pandey and Swati Panda

Hybrid learning, integrating online methods of instruction with face-to-face learning methods, has recently gained increased attention. The literature on pedagogy and course…

Abstract

Purpose

Hybrid learning, integrating online methods of instruction with face-to-face learning methods, has recently gained increased attention. The literature on pedagogy and course management has focused on hybrid learning as a combination of virtual and physical environments, which can shift learning to a more student-centered model from the teacher-centered model. A gap exists in the literature related to the execution of hybrid learning and challenges faced by internal stakeholders, and the outcomes are achieved. This study aims to examine the implementation of hybrid learning courses and investigate the challenges and outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative approach. This study presents a case of a management university in India. Ten semistructured interviews were conducted with the university officials, including the vice-chancellor, dean and faculty members. The data collection method also included reviewing university documents and reports.

Findings

While formalized knowledge transfer through online courses can facilitate knowledge dissemination, it has its own downsides: it needs to be contextualized; it requires additional resources; it is not a one size fits all policy, as its conducive to some and alienates others; and students may not completely adopt it.

Originality/value

This investigation attempts to examine the shift to hybrid learning in the Indian context.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Pinaki Nandan Pattnaik and Satyendra C. Pandey

This paper aims at exploring the role of legislations in university startups.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at exploring the role of legislations in university startups.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic review of legislations in three countries, namely, the USA, Japan and India, has been carried out to assimilate the role of special legislations in university startups.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal the important role that legislations can play in bringing out more university startups. Legislations not only protect the interest of the founder but also provide a cushion to explore further opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

The implications for the makers of the legislations and policies start with the understanding that conducive legislations can help the founders to take up the challenge of starting a commercial entity out of research output.

Originality/value

The study adds to the limited literature connecting university startups and legislations.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 59 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

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