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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Lois Orton, Rachel Anderson de Cuevas, Kristefer Stojanovski, Juan F. Gamella, Margaret Greenfields, Daniel La Parra, Oana Marcu, Yaron Matras, Celia Donert, Diane Frost, Jude Robinson, Eve Rosenhaft, Sarah Salway, Sally Sheard, Elizabeth Such, David Taylor-Robinson and Margaret Whitehead

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence of “Roma health and wellbeing” as a focus of attention in European research and in policy and the possible detrimental…

2498

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the emergence of “Roma health and wellbeing” as a focus of attention in European research and in policy and the possible detrimental consequences of action founded on a generic representation of “Roma health.”

Design/methodology/approach

Based on discussions with and research conducted by scholars who work directly with Roma communities across European regions from a wide range of academic disciplines it suggests how future research might inform: a more nuanced understanding of the causes of poor health and wellbeing among diverse Roma populations and; actions that may have greater potential to improve the health and wellbeing among these populations.

Findings

In summary, the authors promote three types of research: first critical analyses that unpick the implications of current and past representations of “Roma” and “Roma health.” Second, applied participatory research that meaningfully involves people from specific self-defined Roma populations to identify important issues for their health and wellbeing. Third, learning about processes that might impact on the health and wellbeing of Roma populations from research with other populations in similarly excluded situations.

Originality/value

The authors provide a multidisciplinary perspective to inform research that does not perpetuate further alienation and prejudice, but promotes urgent action to redress the social and health injustices experienced by diverse Roma populations across Europe.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Kaveri Harriss and Sarah Salway

Abstract

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Punita Chowbey, Sarah Salway and Mubarak Ismail

Evidence, though limited, suggests that UK minority ethnic individuals have lower referral rates for eating disorders than their White British counterparts. Missed or delayed…

687

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence, though limited, suggests that UK minority ethnic individuals have lower referral rates for eating disorders than their White British counterparts. Missed or delayed diagnosis may be an important contributory factor. This paper seeks to identify key areas that require attention for early detection and treatment of eating disorders in minority ethnic people.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken was a community‐based qualitative study in Sheffield, England: interviews with relatives of people with eating disorders (n=3); key informant interviews (n=15); group discussions with community members aged 18‐24 (n=4, 24 participants).

Findings

Several factors appear to influence the recognition of, and response to, eating disorders among minority ethnic people with potential implications for timely diagnosis and treatment. Low public awareness was an important barrier to seeking medical attention. Norms and ideals relating to food and body image, as well as some religious practices, can also discourage prompt recognition of illness, though there is much diversity within and between families and communities. Some service providers can be slow to consider the possibility of eating disorders among minority ethnic individuals, while others lack confidence to deal with the needs of minority ethnic people. Poor past experiences with services also undermine people's willingness to engage with services.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into socio‐cultural influences on the experiences of people living with eating disorders that require greater attention by services. Healthcare practitioners need enhanced awareness that eating disorders do affect minority ethnic people and greater confidence to engage with these patients to gain the information needed for prompt diagnosis and effective treatment.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

John Skinner, Sarah Salway, Daniel Turner, Lynne Carter, Ghazala Mir, Bushara Bostan and George Ellison

The purpose of this paper is to explore potential benefits in aligning Joint Strategic Needs Assessments (JSNAs) with implementation of the Equality Delivery System (EDS) to…

194

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore potential benefits in aligning Joint Strategic Needs Assessments (JSNAs) with implementation of the Equality Delivery System (EDS) to improve commissioning of healthcare for minority ethnic groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on data gathered for a large research study carried out in England exploring the use of evidence in commissioning for multi‐ethnic populations, to present a reflective discussion on the potential synergies between JSNA and EDS processes. Qualitative data were collected from 62 interviews with stakeholders in Sheffield, Leeds and Bradford, who, as part of their normal role, had an active responsibility to contribute to decision making for commissioning healthcare. 19 individuals working in national roles with experience in evidence use, ethnicity and commissioning across NHS, local authorities and third sector were also interviewed. Observational data were collected through regular attendance at an NHS Equality Group, which had Equality Delivery System implementation within its remit, and from a regional workshop focussing on Joint Strategic Needs Assessment improvements. Observations also came via participation in local EDS implementation meetings across Sheffield, Leeds and Bradford. These data were supplemented by a review of local and national policy literature about implementing JSNA and EDS.

Findings

Formally strengthening the connection between JSNAs and the EDS has potential benefits for enhancing the evidence base about health and wellbeing needs of minority groups in general, and ethnic minorities in particular.

Originality/value

NHS and Local Authority organisations need to establish structural processes to formally connect these two workstreams and to ensure adequate resource is made available, with clear direction from senior management.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Hilary Piercy, Punita Chowbey, John Soady, Permjeet Dhoot, Lerleen Willis and Sarah Salway

The authors examined the cardiac care pathway with the aim of identifying factors that impact on diagnosis and treatment of coronary heart disease in British Pakistani women.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examined the cardiac care pathway with the aim of identifying factors that impact on diagnosis and treatment of coronary heart disease in British Pakistani women.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory qualitative study. In depth interviews and focus groups with an opportunistic sample of Pakistani women and a purposive sample of clinicians working at different points along the care pathway were conducted. The authors used a pathways to care approach to illustrate how their individual and cumulative effect may contribute to differential receipt of treatment, including revascularisation, and health inequalities.

Findings

Four major issues were identified: complex life circumstances; “atypical” presentation and symptomatology; problems related to investigative testing; and poor communication. Mapping these barriers onto the Pathways to Care Model provided valuable insight into their impact on patients' progression through the different stages of the care pathway.

Research limitations/implications

Adopting a care pathway approach demonstrated how individual factors have an impact at several points along the care pathway. It indicated where further, more detailed enquiry is merited and where intervention studies might usefully be directed to improve care.

Practical implications

Examining the whole care pathway identified areas of service improvement that merit a co‐ordinated response.

Originality/value

The framework provided by the Pathways to Care Model offered insight into the causes of the previously observed attenuation in women's progress along the cardiac diagnosis and treatment pathway and is an important first step to addressing this health inequality in a holistic way.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Thao Thi Nguyen and Sarah Neal

In this study, the authors determined the prevalence of contraceptive use among Pakistani women and assessed factors influencing the utilization of contraception with a particular…

1402

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, the authors determined the prevalence of contraceptive use among Pakistani women and assessed factors influencing the utilization of contraception with a particular focus on the experience of gender-based violence.

Design/methodology/approach

The dataset used in this study was the Pakistan Demographic Health Survey 2018, which includes married women only. Bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to investigate the association between contraceptive use and a number of explanatory variables including experience of gender-based violence.

Findings

From 2006 to 2018, the contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) and the use of modern contraceptive methods increased slowly. The findings of this study demonstrated that higher educational level and wealth index increased the likelihood of contraceptive uptake and the use of modern contraception. Media exposure to family planning and spousal communication were protective factors that encouraged women to use contraception, including modern contraception, to avoid unwanted pregnancy. Women who experienced gender-based violence (GBV) were more likely to use contraception than women who did not experience GBV.

Research limitations/implications

The use of secondary data limited the variety of important variable that should be investigated including knowledge of women on SRH, the attitude of women toward SRH and family planning, the skills of a healthcare provider on counseling family planning, and other barrier variables such as transportation and willingness to pay for contraceptive methods. 10;The sensitivity of the topic is considered as another challenge when collecting data. Women might be hesitant to share about their GBV experience. The experience to GBV is also hard to define and depends on the feeling of each person, especially emotional violence.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the very few studies to examine the association between GBV and contraceptive use, and thus is valuable in opening up debate about the links between these two factors.

Details

Fulbright Review of Economics and Policy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2635-0173

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Anne Lundin

In the novel, The Member of the Wedding, Carson McCullers probes the American malaise through the longings of a young adolescent girl. Twelve‐year‐old Frankie no longer sees the…

Abstract

In the novel, The Member of the Wedding, Carson McCullers probes the American malaise through the longings of a young adolescent girl. Twelve‐year‐old Frankie no longer sees the world as round and inviting as a school globe. No, the world is huge and cracked and turning a thousand miles an hour. Indeed, the world seems separate from herself. In the midst of chaos, Frankie sees her brother's upcoming wedding as a chance to feel connected, to feel that she matters. The story focuses on Frankie's efforts to be a “member of the wedding,” as she recognizes, “they are the we of me.”

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that…

Abstract

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that date two extensions to the building have taken place. The first, in 1882, provided a separate room for both Reference and Lending libraries; the second, opened in 1938, provided a new Children's Department. Together with the original cost of the building, these extensions were entirely financed by Sir Peter Coats, James Coats of Auchendrane and Daniel Coats respectively. The people of Paisley indeed owe much to this one family, whose generosity was great. They not only provided the capital required but continued to donate many useful and often extremely valuable works of reference over the many years that followed. In 1975 Paisley Library was incorporated in the new Renfrew District library service.

Details

Library Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Maurizio Massaro, John Dumay, Andrea Garlatti and Francesca Dal Mas

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between intellectual capital (IC) and sustainability using practitioners’ perspectives and by developing an analysis…

1884

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between intellectual capital (IC) and sustainability using practitioners’ perspectives and by developing an analysis of comments and practices published in 1,651 blog posts in one of the leading sources of sustainability research: CSRwire.com.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,651 posts, containing more than 1.5 million words, published by experts in the field of sustainability are analysed using Leximancer and content analysis.

Findings

The results reveal IC and sustainability to be complex topics under active discussion by practitioners, and several links to the IC literature are identified and compared. The findings focus on the managerial practices applied by leading companies, as discussed by practitioners, that show IC and sustainability influence each other in answering a plurality of demands or logics.

Research limitations/implications

First, the authors identify the need to study the managerial practices proposed by practitioners, rather than their company reports. Second, the authors propose developing a trading zone for IC researchers and practitioners. Third, the authors reflect on the role of new communication tools, such as integrated reporting, to connect IC and sustainability. Finally, the authors conclude that the relationship between IC and sustainability could benefit from a fifth stage of IC research that considers justifications of the worth of IC and sustainability practices.

Originality/value

The paper is novel because it addresses concerns about the relationship between IC and sustainability by examining messages posted by practitioners, rather than examining company disclosures. This leads to an understanding of the impact of practices rather than the desires motivating practice. The results support the view that it is time to remove the boundaries of IC research and work towards reconciling the worth of IC to different people in different contexts. The authors argue that practitioners require scholars to reduce the ambiguity between IC and its expected results. This would open the door to a potentially productive way of understanding IC and the complexity of economic, social, and environmental value. In short, researchers should change their research questions from, “What is IC worth to investors, customers, society, and the environment?” to “Is managing IC a worthwhile endeavour?”

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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