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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

C. Lakshman, Sumita Rai and Sangeetha Lakshman

This study aims to theorize a knowledge-based perspective on organizational commitment and turnover intentions among knowledge workers. The authors contribute by examining the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to theorize a knowledge-based perspective on organizational commitment and turnover intentions among knowledge workers. The authors contribute by examining the impact of knowledge sharing, and managerial human capital respectively, on commitment and turnover in a sample of 274 knowledge workers (engineers) from India. Additionally, the authors examine the crucial moderating role of intra-firm causal ambiguity on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using structural equation modeling and analysis of survey responses, the authors test a moderated mediation model to provide evidence of the positive impact of knowledge sharing and human capital, respectively, on turnover intention, mediated by organizational commitment. More importantly, the authors theorize and present evidence on the moderating role of intra-firm causal ambiguity, on these relationships.

Findings

The authors find that knowledge sharing behaviors are both intrinsically and extrinsically motivating for knowledge workers, which results in their emotional attachments and higher levels of identification and commitment, which subsequently results in lower turnover intention. Our findings also highlight the role of intra-firm causal ambiguity in making things difficult for organizations to retain talented employees in tough environments.

Originality/value

The authors provide a knowledge-based perspective of commitment and turnover in knowledge-intensive work contexts. The authors also contribute by provide an interesting account of the role of intra-firm causal ambiguity in knowledge processes leading to commitment.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

C. Lakshman, Sangeetha Lakshman and Kubilay Gok

Based on attributional complexity (AC) theory, the authors empirically examine the impact of biculturalism on cross-cultural adjustment and the degree to which people make…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on attributional complexity (AC) theory, the authors empirically examine the impact of biculturalism on cross-cultural adjustment and the degree to which people make isomorphic attributions, critical for cross-cultural leadership effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Using questionnaire surveys, the authors first validate measures in a validation sample and then empirically test the model in a second sample, using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The authors’ findings reveal an empirical connection between biculturalism and AC on the one hand, while also showing support for the relationship between biculturalism and attributional knowledge. Findings also demonstrate that biculturalism is related to attributional accuracy in cross-cultural contexts via an attributional mechanism, as suggested by AC theory.

Research limitations/implications

First, AC theory emerges as one with excellent prospects for explaining intercultural work in multicultural settings. Biculturalism's links to AC and attributional knowledge are critical for extensions to cross-cultural leadership effectiveness, and international knowledge transfer, interesting and high potential research avenues for the discipline.

Practical implications

The authors’ findings carry a host of managerial implications. AC training can provide all international assignees with the necessary foundational skills and learning abilities to successfully interact in the host country setting with local nationals. This study also suggests that managers on international assignments should focus their efforts on acquiring attributional knowledge because it can provide a solid boost to their understanding of the local culture.

Originality/value

One’s understanding of biculturals and their cross-cultural management competencies is very limited. The authors provide empirical support for the hypotheses, hitherto unexamined in extant literature.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Sangeetha Lakshman and C. Lakshman

The purpose of this paper is to provide an initial exploration of how expatriate roles change over time, across different stages of MNC international expansion, and subsequently…

1366

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an initial exploration of how expatriate roles change over time, across different stages of MNC international expansion, and subsequently theorize on the dynamic nature of change in expatriate roles.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used the qualitative approach of building theory from interviews, creating theoretical propositions from empirical evidence. The authors conducted in-depth interviews with 22 top executives of large MNCs to derive rich descriptions on expatriate roles to build the cases which were subsequently comparatively analyzed.

Findings

The authors find that expatriate roles become increasingly differentiated over time, with different expatriates performing specialized roles. The findings suggest that the proportion of expatriates used as commanders in directly/explicitly controlling subsidiaries decreases over time. Role differentiation is strongly linked to the pressures for local responsiveness and pressures for standardization, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The exploratory evidence and resulting theorization needs to be verified in other samples and refined further using more longitudinal designs.

Practical implications

Knowledge of how and when expatriate roles change provides crucial inputs to HR managers for designing expatriate jobs, selecting appropriate candidates, and preparing them through appropriate training.

Originality/value

The findings identify the unique contribution that expatriates in later stages move away from commander roles in to roles demanding socialization, networking, knowledge sharing, coaching, and training, especially in firms that are high on the dimension of local responsiveness. Bears become bumble-bees and spiders in later stages of internalization especially for firms pursuing multi-domestic and transnational strategies.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Sangeetha Lakshman, C. Lakshman and Christophe Estay

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of business strategies with executive staffing of multinational companies (MNCs).

5596

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of business strategies with executive staffing of multinational companies (MNCs).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on in-depth interviews conducted with top executives of 22 MNCs’, the authors identify important connections between international business strategies and staffing orientation. The authors used the qualitative research approach of building theory from interviews; thus, creating theoretical propositions from empirical evidence.

Findings

The authors find that when the pressure for global integration is high, MNCs use more parent-country national (PCNs) (ethnocentric staffing) as against the use of host-country managers (HCNs) (polycentric staffing) when this pressure is low. Additionally, MNCs using a global strategy are more likely to use an ethnocentric staffing approach, those using a multi-domestic strategy use a polycentric approach and firms using transnational strategy adopt a mix of ethnocentric and polycentric approaches.

Research limitations/implications

Although the authors derive theoretical patterns based on rich qualitative data, their sample is relatively small and comprises mostly of French MNCs. Generalizability to a broader context is limited. However, the authors’ findings have critical implications for future research.

Practical implications

The authors’ findings provide critical managerial implications for MNCs in matching their HR strategies with business strategies. These are important for effective strategy implementation.

Originality/value

Although MNC staffing orientations have been studied for a long time, their relationship to international business strategies is still not clearly understood. The authors contribute to the literature by investigating the relationship between MNCs’ business strategy types with staffing orientations.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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