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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Ronald J. Burke, Fay Oberklaid and Zena Burgess

This study examined the relationship of female and male psychologists perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their work experiences…

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of female and male psychologists perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their work experiences, work and non‐work satisfactions, and psychological well‐being. Data were collected from 458 Australian psychologists using anonymous questionnaires. Psychologists reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported greater job and career satisfaction, less work stress, less intention to quit, greater family satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms, and more positive emotional well‐being. Interestingly, perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance were unrelated to hours and extra‐hours worked and job involvement.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Ghada El-Kot, Ronald J. Burke and Lisa M. Fiksenbaum

This paper aims to examine the relationship of perceived supervisor empowerment behaviors and feelings of personal empowerment with important work and well-being outcomes in a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship of perceived supervisor empowerment behaviors and feelings of personal empowerment with important work and well-being outcomes in a sample of Egyptian women managers and professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 155 managerial and professional women using anonymously completed questionnaires. Respondents were relatively young; had university educations; had the short job and organizational tenures; held various levels of management jobs; and worked in a range of functions. All measures used here had been used and validated previously by other researchers.

Findings

Work outcomes included job satisfaction, career satisfaction, work engagement, work-family and family-work conflict, emotional exhaustion/burnout, life satisfaction and intent to quit. Both perceived levels of supervisory/leader empowerment behaviors and self-reported feelings of empowerment had significant relationships with the majority of work and well-being outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected using self-report questionnaires with the small risk of response set and common method biases. Second, all data were collected at one point in time making it challenging to address issues of causality. Third, all respondents came from the two largest cities in Egypt, Cairo and Alexandria; thus, the extent to which our findings would generalize to managerial and professional women and men is indeterminate. Fourth, it was not possible to determine the representativeness of our sample as well.

Practical implications

Practical implications of these findings along with future research directions are offered. Practical applications include training supervisors on empowerment behaviors, and training all employees on the benefits of personal empowerment and efficacy and ways to increase them.

Social implications

A number of ways to increase levels of empowerment of both front-line employees and managers have been identified. These include increasing employee participation in decision-making, delegating authority and control to these employees, creating more challenging work roles through job redesign, leaders sharing more information and leaders providing more coaching and mentoring to their staff. At the micro level, increasing levels of employee self-efficacy through training and more effective use of their work experiences will increase personal empowerment and improve work outcomes.

Originality/value

Relatively little research has been undertaken on women in management and human resource management in Egypt.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Ronald J. Burke

745

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Ronald J. Burke

Examines gender differences in communication patterns within a single, large, professional services firm. Considers nine specific sources of information, falling under three broad…

Abstract

Examines gender differences in communication patterns within a single, large, professional services firm. Considers nine specific sources of information, falling under three broad categories (interpersonal, official company publications, informal). Respondents indicated how much information they received, their preference for information, and the value of information received from each source. Finds few gender differences at the highest organizational levels (partners, managers) but considerable gender difference at lower organizational levels (professional field staff, secretarial and support staff). Women at lower organizational levels had greater preference for information from all three sources and received more information from official company publications and informal sources.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Ronald J. Burke, Zena Burgess and Fay Oberrlaid

This study examined the relationship of male psychologists’ perception of organizational values supporting work‐personal life balance in their workplace and their work…

1073

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of male psychologists’ perception of organizational values supporting work‐personal life balance in their workplace and their work experiences, indicators of work and life satisfaction and psychological well‐being. Data were collected from 134 men using anonymous questionnaires. Male psychologists reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported more joy in work, less job stress, lower intentions to quit, greater job, and career and more optimistic career prospects, satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms and more positive emotional and physical well‐being. Interestingly, organizational values supporting balance had no relationship with hours worked on job involvement.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Ronald J. Burke

This study, using a longitudinal design, examined the relationship of perceived organizational support (POS) and job satisfaction among hospital‐based nursing staff survivors of…

1542

Abstract

This study, using a longitudinal design, examined the relationship of perceived organizational support (POS) and job satisfaction among hospital‐based nursing staff survivors of significant healthcare restructuring. In addition, the role of both restructuring processes and restructuring stressors in affecting POS, and the potential mediating role of POS in the relationship between both restructuring processes and stressors and job satisfaction, was considered. Data were collected from 393 respondents at two points separated by three years. Levels of POS were relatively low on both occasions and declined slightly over the three year period. POS and job satisfaction were found to have a bi‐directional relationship over time. Both restructuring processes and stressors had significant relationships with POS, positive and negative respectively. POS fully mediated the relationship between restructuring processes and job satisfaction and partially mediated the relationship between restructuring stressors and job satisfaction.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Ronald J. Burke and Susan Black

This manuscript examines the use of corporate women's groups to achieve a more level organizational playing field. It first reviews the literature on the use of such groups to…

Abstract

This manuscript examines the use of corporate women's groups to achieve a more level organizational playing field. It first reviews the literature on the use of such groups to bring about change, considering such topics as the origins, purposes, membership, structure, and benefits of such groups to women and to their organizations. Then three ongoing case studies of such groups are summarized Corporate women's groups face some unique challenges in changing organizations as a result of their bottom‐up approach to change.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Mitchell G. Rothstein, Ronald J. Burke and Julia M. Bristor

This study investigated a series of hypotheses stemming from Ibarra's (1993) proposed conceptual framework for understanding differences between women's and men's interpersonal…

Abstract

This study investigated a series of hypotheses stemming from Ibarra's (1993) proposed conceptual framework for understanding differences between women's and men's interpersonal networks. Using a sample of 112 managers, we examined differences between women's and men's network structural characteristics, and the relationships between these characteristics and support benefits obtained. Consistent with Ibarra, we found that certain network characteristics varied considerably between women and men managers. Women and men tended to belong to different networks in their organizations. Although both groups obtained similar amounts of support from their networks, women managers received their support from substantially different networks, characterized by lower levels of status and power in their organizations. Results are interpreted with respect to Ibarra's theoretical propositions concerning differences between women's and men's networks in organizations.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Ronald J. Burke and Esther R. Greenglass

Examines the effects of hospital restructuring and downsizing on components of psychological burnout experienced by a predominantly female sample of hospital‐based nursing staff…

1322

Abstract

Examines the effects of hospital restructuring and downsizing on components of psychological burnout experienced by a predominantly female sample of hospital‐based nursing staff. Collects data from 1,362 staff nurses using anonymous questionnaires Considers three components of psychological burn‐out: emotional exhaustion, cynicism and prfessional efficacy. Includes three blocks of predictors: personal demographics, work situation characteristics, and three different measures of demands resulting from a restructuring experience. Concludes the experience of hospital restructuring and downsizing was consistently related to a high level of emotional exhaustion and cynicism, controlling for personal demographic and work situation characteristics.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

1 – 10 of 541