Search results

1 – 5 of 5
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Rogério Miorando and Diego Tlapa

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the effect of a set of contextual variables on the implementation of lean supply chain (LSC) practices. The authors do that…

1771

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the effect of a set of contextual variables on the implementation of lean supply chain (LSC) practices. The authors do that by investigating one main research question: “how do the contextual variables (i.e. plant size, supply chain level, level of onshore suppliers and age of the LM initiative) influence on the degree of adoption of LSC practices?”

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, the authors collected data from 115 companies from different sectors located in Southern Brazil. Data collected was analyzed by means of multivariate techniques. The authors tested if the frequency of observations for each contextual variable was associated to the implementation levels of the LSC practices.

Findings

The evidences suggest that supply chain context significantly impacts the likelihood of implementing LSC practices. In particular, the influence of tier level, plant size and larger experience in implementing LM seems to be substantial across a wide mix of practices. On the other hand, results indicate that contexts in which companies are still beginners at the lean journey and their level of onshore suppliers appear to be less pervasive than previous empirical researches imply.

Originality/value

The implementation of LSC practices entails a different business model, in which improved profits arise from the cooperation rather than bargaining or imposing power over supply chain partners. However, not all organizations should implement the same set of practices, since the adoption of any specific management practice depends upon a set of contextual variables. The understanding of the relationship between the level of adoption of LSC practices and the contextual variables helps to anticipate occasional difficulties and sets the proper expectations along the implementation.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Guilherme Tortorella, Rogério Miorando, Marcelo Meiriño and Rapinder Sawhney

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of practitioners’ experience and generational differences on the adoption level of lean production (LP) principles in their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of practitioners’ experience and generational differences on the adoption level of lean production (LP) principles in their daily decisions and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out a cross-sector survey with 135 practitioners from different Brazilian manufacturers that have been implementing LP for at least five years. Collected data were analyzed based on multivariate techniques.

Findings

The results show how different combinations between practitioners’ LP experience and generational characteristics may entail a higher likelihood of adopting LP principles. While members from generation X do not seem to be associated with the adoption of LP principles, the ones from generations Y and Z are differently related with LP based upon their experience levels.

Originality/value

The understanding of individual differences for adopting LP principles allows the establishment of proper expectations with respect to each practitioner’s openness to change. Studies that address the adoption level of LP principles based on certain individual characteristics, such as practitioners’ experience with lean implementation and their generational values and beliefs, are scarce in the literature.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2020

Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Rogério Miorando, Diego Fettermann and Diego Tlapa Mendoza

This article identifies the association between two methods for teaching lean manufacturing (LM): problem-based learning (PBL) and classroom lectures, and students' learning…

Abstract

Purpose

This article identifies the association between two methods for teaching lean manufacturing (LM): problem-based learning (PBL) and classroom lectures, and students' learning styles of a postgraduate course.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from graduate students LM courses that present different teaching approaches. Thus, students' learning preferences were gathered through the application of the Index of Learning Style questionnaire, and their performance assessed after each course.

Findings

Results indicate that learning styles are indeed associated with LM teaching approaches, and comprehending interaction effects between learning style dimensions is essential for properly adapting the teaching method. However, these interactions have different extensions.

Originality/value

Although teaching LM has significantly evolved over the past decades, the single application of traditional teaching methods jeopardizes learning effectiveness of graduate students because of the practical nature of LM. This study provides evidence to better understand the effect of complementary teaching methods and their relationship with students' preferences, empirically examining that there is not one best approach for understanding LM.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

136

Abstract

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

3074

Abstract

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

1 – 5 of 5