Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Case study
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Samuel E. Bodily, John Tyler and Robert Jenkins

The organizers of a music festival may use video from the Friday concert to create a DVD to sell to those who come to the Saturday concert. Attendance on Saturday is…

Abstract

The organizers of a music festival may use video from the Friday concert to create a DVD to sell to those who come to the Saturday concert. Attendance on Saturday is uncertain, as is the percentage of those who attend on Saturday who will buy the DVD. Is this a good project? If so, what number of DVDs should be burned early Saturday morning and offered for sale at that evening’s performance? By that time, Friday attendance is known, as well as whether it rained on Friday, and there is a forecast for whether it will rain on Saturday. Historical information on these variables may help us predict Saturday attendance using multiple regression; together with the results of a marketing survey, such analysis will help us make better purchasing decisions. This case series (see also the B case, UVA-QA-0708) can be used to illuminate a multitude of concepts that are covered in basic decision-analysis courses. The series starts by examining the role of uncertainty in decision-making, proceeds through the estimation of probability distributions from sample data with multiple regression, culminates in the development of a full decision model, and ends with a qualitative and quantitative analysis (with a tornado diagram) of how to add value and reduce risk. Key pitfalls for students are failing to recognize both limits on sales (supply and demand), incomplete reasoning in the determination of the attendance probability distribution, and oversimplifying the full forecast model.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Gary Clendenen and John Mark Hutchins

East Texas Oxygen (ETOX) delivered high-pressure cylinders of gases such as oxygen and nitrogen to twelve wholly-owned branches scattered throughout East Texas and…

Abstract

East Texas Oxygen (ETOX) delivered high-pressure cylinders of gases such as oxygen and nitrogen to twelve wholly-owned branches scattered throughout East Texas and Louisiana. Employees loaded and unloaded individual high-pressure cylinders off of and onto trailers manually and the firm had never had a related accident. Robert Jenkins had been challenged to decrease the cost of supplying the branches with cylinders and other supplies. He was considering recommending the palletization of delivery operations which required numerous changes within the organization. This case required students to determine the best routing for the delivery truck(s) and to determine whether or not the number of trucks and drivers could be reduced under palletization. Students were then required to do a capital budgeting analysis and make a recommendation of whether or not to palletize.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Simon Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to look beyond the issue of disclosure/non‐disclosure in the workplace, to explore the ways gay men challenge, negotiate and conform in the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look beyond the issue of disclosure/non‐disclosure in the workplace, to explore the ways gay men challenge, negotiate and conform in the two‐way process of managing their identities in what Jenkins terms the interaction order. In the validation of their external identities, the author aims to identify critical incidents and experiences in gay men's working lives in which they have resisted or challenged identities, labels and stereotypes ascribed by others.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered through ten semi‐structured interviews with self‐identified gay men in a wide range of occupations and age ranges working in Bournemouth, UK.

Findings

The data focus on the fluidity of identity and the impact of organisational context. In their self‐presentations a number of strategies were deployed. The respondents experienced exclusion, stereotyping, being viewed as a piece of curiosity, silence, discomfort and a marked identity in the eyes of others. In response to these reactions, themes of compliance, conformity and adopting an educator role were uncovered.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings presented are not necessarily generalizable, themes of exclusion, silence and marked identities were uncovered that echo many previous studies of gay men's experiences in the workplace.

Originality/value

Little research has been done on identity management in the workplace beyond the issue of disclosure of sexual identity. In particular, there has been limited focus on how gay men challenge, negotiate and modify the labels and social identities ascribed by others in what Jenkins terms the interaction order. Nor does there seem to be any research on whether gay men have modified the management of their social identities throughout their working lives.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Rachel Davies and Robert Jenkins

Learning disability nurses are in a prime position to help protect clients from abuse. But current training programmes are not preparing nurses adequately to fulfill this…

Abstract

Learning disability nurses are in a prime position to help protect clients from abuse. But current training programmes are not preparing nurses adequately to fulfill this role. This article argues that a shift in organisational culture is required in order to ensure new knowledge is properly integrated with nurses' experience and training needs.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Rachel Davies, Ian Mansell, Ruth Northway and Robert Jenkins

The abuse of people with learning disabilities is a significant problem. The response of the police to abuse that is actually a criminal offence is paramount. This paper…

Abstract

The abuse of people with learning disabilities is a significant problem. The response of the police to abuse that is actually a criminal offence is paramount. This paper reports on a qualitative study into the attitudes and opinions of police officers involved in abuse investigations. The aims were to understand more about the perceptions that police have about their role, the contribution made by the police to the area and to identify good practice where it occurs. Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted with police officers regarding their experiences of involvement in vulnerable adult protection and views on the role of the police. Findings are presented according to key themes: structure for abuse work, joint investigator training, understanding the needs of people with learning disabilities, the legislative context for abuse work and sharing good practice and striving for a consistent response. Demand is growing for the police to respond to the abuse of people with learning disabilities in a way that is both appropriate and maximises the likelihood of victims receiving justice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Ruth Northway, Rachel Davies, Robert Jenkins and Ian Mansell

The importance and challenges in providing a good practice evidence base for adult protection are outlined. The literature search, review and mapping exercise that formed…

Abstract

The importance and challenges in providing a good practice evidence base for adult protection are outlined. The literature search, review and mapping exercise that formed part of the Abuse of Adults with Learning Disabilities: Policy, Practice and Educational Implications in Wales research study is detailed. The article presents examples from this evidence mapping exercise and considers the importance of adult protection research to the future development of policy and practice.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

The Becker Group, the Swedish multi‐national paint company who took over Goodlass Wall & Co Ltd of Liverpool in 1984, have agreed to enter a joint venture in the field of…

Abstract

The Becker Group, the Swedish multi‐national paint company who took over Goodlass Wall & Co Ltd of Liverpool in 1984, have agreed to enter a joint venture in the field of consumer and trade paint operations with AB Alfort & Cronholm, another leading Swedish paint manufacturer. A joint venture company will be established under the name Alcro‐Becker AB. It will be jointly owned by Becker and Alfort & Cronholm on a 50/50 percentage basis.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

CHARLES F. BROOK

THE ANCIENT and royal burgh of Stirling, at one time the capital of Scotland, was at the turn of the century the county town of Stirlingshire and the centre of a thriving…

Abstract

THE ANCIENT and royal burgh of Stirling, at one time the capital of Scotland, was at the turn of the century the county town of Stirlingshire and the centre of a thriving agricultural community. With the exception of a carpet and woollen mill and some neighbouring coal mines, there was little industry in the town. This was reflected in its social structure. There was growing up in the village of Raploch, beneath the castle rock, a sizeable Irish community of labourers and artisans, but of a population of around 20,000 in 1900, middle class businessmen and shopkeepers predominated. The town's structure in turn was reflected in the nature of the Town Council, which, although not always conservative in politics, was generally conservative when faced with innovation, be it a swimming pool or a modern town centre. This might explain why in Stirling the public library movement was late in starting, nearly 25 years after the Public Libraries (Scotland) Act of 1870 authorising the use for library purposes of 1 d. in the £ from the rates. It might also explain why there was some opposition from the Town Council to providing for the upkeep of the library after its foundation.

Details

Library Review, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1939

Liverpool Conference was amongst the largest, as it was amongst the most successful, of recent years. In all but the weather it excelled, and there were fine intervals…

Abstract

Liverpool Conference was amongst the largest, as it was amongst the most successful, of recent years. In all but the weather it excelled, and there were fine intervals even in that. We publish the “Letters on our Affairs” by our well known correspondent, Callimachus, so far as it covers the first three days; the conclusion will follow next month, with what futcher comments seem to be necessary. The Annual Business Meeting was a little less rowdy than that at Scarborough, but one thing emerged from it and that was the determination of the A.A.L. to survive independently. There is more in this than meets the eye, and discussion on it may be postponed until a calmer mood prevails on all sides.

Details

New Library World, vol. 41 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Wyn Jenkins

Ideas from microeconomics, market‐positioning theory and resource‐based theory have been brought together to develop a framework for discussing firm competitiveness and survival.

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Abstract

Purpose

Ideas from microeconomics, market‐positioning theory and resource‐based theory have been brought together to develop a framework for discussing firm competitiveness and survival.

Design/methodology/approach

Propositions about the nature of scale economies, time, resource imitability and customer‐perceived benefits are used to provide a basis for the analysis of firms and their markets. The structures of markets and the impact of innovation and environment on these structures are discussed.

Findings

A number of hypotheses are advanced. When movements in consumer perceptions and technology are slow and predictable, leading firms may have developed enough resource capital to remain dominant. When they are not, opportunities for market leadership changes occur.

Research limitations/implications

A conclusion is that strategic management should involve the study of firms in the context of their market situation. Market‐based case studies should seek to understand how markets evolve over time by tracking changes in key variables.

Practical implications

The paper outlines factors that firms’ managers need to take into account in order to evaluate their relationships with their competitors. How these relationships impact on industry structure and the long‐term equilibrium that would result if these relationships remain unchanged is discussed.

Originality/value

A contribution to thinking about research and practical strategic management longitudinally is proposed. The approach emphasises the importance of relationships between firms and the factors that may dynamically change those relationships.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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