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1 – 10 of 407
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2021

Abe Oudshoorn, Tanya Benjamin, Tracy A. Smith-Carrier, Sarah Benbow, Carrie Anne Marshall, Riley Kennedy, Jodi Hall, C. Susana Caxaj, Helene Berman and Deanna Befus

People experiencing homelessness are uniquely vulnerable to the impacts of a pandemic, such as COVID-19. Therefore, governments across Canada have been implementing a patchwork of…

1207

Abstract

Purpose

People experiencing homelessness are uniquely vulnerable to the impacts of a pandemic, such as COVID-19. Therefore, governments across Canada have been implementing a patchwork of responses to address the needs of those who are homeless at this time. The purpose of this study is to both compile and assess the varying responses by exploring the breadth of actions presented in print and social media.

Design/methodology/approach

Rapid review methodology is a means of compiling a breadth of information to compare and contrast policy implementations. Herein, the authors provide a comprehensive rapid review of responses to homelessness considered through a health equity lens.

Findings

Based on policy implementations to date, the authors offer eight recommendations of potentially promising practices among these responses. Situated within a capabilities approach, the authors call upon governments to provide a full breadth of responses to ensure that both health and housing are better protected and obtained during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

This paper presents the first comprehensive review of local government responses to homelessness in the context of COVID-19.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 24 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Allan H. Church

Although a large contingency of theory and research has been conducted in the area of individual and interpersonal communication, relatively few theoreticians have focused on the…

1086

Abstract

Although a large contingency of theory and research has been conducted in the area of individual and interpersonal communication, relatively few theoreticians have focused on the broader character of communication at the organizational level of analysis. With the increasing emphases on total quality, leadership, adaptive cultures, process reengineering, and other organizational change and development efforts, however, the need to understand the process and function of organizational communication at a broader, more systemic level is paramount. The following paper attempts to address this issue by providing: (1) a comparative review and critique of three “classic” theoretical approaches to describing the importance of communication in organizations and the relationship between communication and organizational functioning (open systems theory, the information‐processing perspective, and the communication as culture framework); and (2) a new integrative framework—the CPR model of organizational communication—for conceptualizing and understanding the nature of communication in organizations based on constructs adapted from these three perspectives. The model is then used both in an applied example to help diagnose an organizational system and to stimulate suggestions for future research.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Ceridwyn King and Debra Grace

Employees are now viewed as playing a crucial role in brand management as they facilitate the interface between the organization and the market. This study, therefore, seeks to…

7058

Abstract

Purpose

Employees are now viewed as playing a crucial role in brand management as they facilitate the interface between the organization and the market. This study, therefore, seeks to examine the role of employees in the delivery of the brand and, in doing so, further one's understanding of an area that, to date, has received little empirical attention from an operational management perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study demonstrated the use of a qualitative methodological approach to inductively and holistically understand the operational management perspective in a context‐specific situation. A case study approach was adopted and data were gathered via semi‐structured interviews with managers of a customer‐focused organization.

Findings

Several themes were identified from the interviews, namely, control, foundation, internal marketing (IM), management role, direction, employee satisfaction, enhancers and element of control. As such, these themes provide the foundation for the discussion and implications of this study.

Research limitations/implications

With respect to employing a case study methodology, the inherent limitations that are generally associated with this method include insufficient precision (i.e. quantifiable), objectivity and rigor. As such, the development of a case study database and the formalisation of the interview process increased the likelihood of trustworthiness and credibility in the results.

Practical implications

The themes identified in both the extant literature and this study, for example, IM, evidence the need for methods, in addition to systems and procedures, to be employed so as to ensure that employees are successful in delivering a service that is consistent with the organization's communicated brand values. Further to this, employees, being aware of the organization's brand and how to deliver the brand promise, are believed to create direction and influence employee behaviour. In doing so, employee role ambiguity and conflict are decreased.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in the presentation of empirical evidence and evaluation of employees' roles in delivering the brand promise. Moreover, the emergence of global brands across all industries ensures that the insights of this study, afforded by the application of a qualitative methodology, have relevance both internationally and across industries.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Charles Fruehling Springwood

Frieda brought her four graham crackers on a saucer and some milk in a blue-and-white Shirley Temple cup. She was a long time with the milk, and gazed fondly at the silhouette of…

Abstract

Frieda brought her four graham crackers on a saucer and some milk in a blue-and-white Shirley Temple cup. She was a long time with the milk, and gazed fondly at the silhouette of Shirley Temple's dimpled face. Frieda and she had a loving conversation about how cu-ute Shirley Temple was. I couldn't join them in their adoration because I hated Shirley. Not because she was cute, but because she danced with Bojangles, was myfriend, myuncle, mydaddy, and who ought to have been soft-shoeing and chuckling with me. Instead he was enjoying, sharing, giving a lovely dance thing with one of those little white girls whose socks never slid down under their heals. So I said, “I like Jane Withers.” (Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye, 2000 p. 19)

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-785-7

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2023

Sakina Dixon, Jera Elizondo Niewoehner-Green, Stacy Smulowitz, Deborah N. Smith, Amy Rutstein-Riley and Trenae M. Thomas

This scoping review aims to examine peer-reviewed literature related to girls’ (age 0–18) and young women’s (age 19–30) leader identity development.

Abstract

Purpose

This scoping review aims to examine peer-reviewed literature related to girls’ (age 0–18) and young women’s (age 19–30) leader identity development.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a scoping review. A research librarian was consulted at the start of the project. Two sets of search terms (one for each age group) were identified and then used to find publications via our selected databases. The search results were uploaded to Covidence and evaluated using the determined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The final sample of articles for the review was analyzed using exploratory coding methods.

Findings

From the analysis, four domains were identified that influence girls’ and young women’s leader identity development: relationships, personal characteristics, meaningful engagement and social identities.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to solely explore girls’ and young women’s leader identity development. The factors and domains identified provide useful guidance for future research and practice. The findings reveal considerations about leader identity that can inform the creation of effective leadership development initiatives for girls early in their lifespan. These interventions could provide girls with a strong leadership foundation that could drastically alter their leadership trajectories in adulthood. Previous research has conveyed the advantages of having more women participate in leadership. Thus, this potential not only benefits girls and women but organizations and society at large.

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Dianne Lewis

The first in a series of two articles, traces the saga of the organizational culture literature from the organization development model through to the recent interest in total…

5666

Abstract

The first in a series of two articles, traces the saga of the organizational culture literature from the organization development model through to the recent interest in total quality management, forming a link between the three concepts. The literature has, at various times ‐ and sometimes concurrently ‐ defined the concept of culture, prescribed methods of study and diagnosis, discussed the possibility of culture change and often prescribed change methods, recommended methods to evaluate the extent and success of change and, most recently, looked at the part culture and culture change play in achieving total quality through the medium of total quality management. With few exceptions, the notion of managerial control is not addressed. Argues that, while TQM had separate origins from the culture movement, the two fields have converged recently with the idea that to achieve “excellence” and “quality”, it is necessary either to change or work with the culture of an organization. Reviews the literature concerned with defining the concept of culture itself and recommended methods of study, diagnosis and measurement, themes that occur predominantly in the early literature.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1977

Sherril H. Kennedy

Concerns itself with the way in which company images are formed and disseminated and discusses work carried out among the employees, suppliers and purchasers of a heavy goods…

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Abstract

Concerns itself with the way in which company images are formed and disseminated and discusses work carried out among the employees, suppliers and purchasers of a heavy goods manufacturing company. Argues that company employees should be made the focus of attention, since these are potential salesmen in the widest sense of the world. Suggests a company's experience, particularly in the industrial and service sectors will rely heavily on personal contact with employees, e.g. employees will portray an image of the company as it effects them. Proposes that all people external to the company but coming into contact with it receive the same image. Pinpoints a questionnaire involving a company image profile of engineering where employees are slightly pessimistic – includes these in question and answer format. Concludes that a company's good image among its employees and subsequently among those outside it, rests in the hands of top management. – and how can this be ignored?

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1902

As yet there are no indications that the President of the Local Government Board intends to give the force of law to the recommendations submitted to him by the Departmental…

Abstract

As yet there are no indications that the President of the Local Government Board intends to give the force of law to the recommendations submitted to him by the Departmental Committee appointed by the Board to inquire into the use of preservatives and colouring matters in food. It is earnestly to be hoped that at least some of the recommendations of the Committee will become law. It is in the highest degree objectionable that when a Committee of the kind has been appointed, and has carried out a long and difficult investigation, the recommendations which it finally makes should be treated with indifference and should not be acted upon. If effect should not be given to the views arrived at after the careful consideration given to the whole subject by the Committee, a very heavy responsibility would rest upon the Authorities, and it cannot but be admitted that the Committee ought never to have been appointed if it was not originally intended that its recommendations should be made legally effective. Every sensible person who takes the trouble to study the evidence and the report must come to the conclusion that the enforcement of the recommendations is urgently required upon health considerations alone, and must see that a long‐suffering public is entitled to receive rather more protection than the existing legal enactments can afford. To refrain from legalising the principal recommendations in the face of such evidence and of such a report would almost amount to criminal negligence and folly. We are well aware that the subject is not one that is easily “understanded of the people,” and that the complicated ignorance of various noisy persons who imagine that they have a right to hold opinions upon it is one of the stumbling blocks in the way of reform; but we believe that this ignorance is confined, in the main, to irresponsible individuals, and that the Government Authorities concerned are not going to provide the public with a painful exhibition of incapacity and inaction in connection with the matter. There is some satisfaction in knowing that although the recommendations have not yet passed into law, they can be used with powerful effect in any prosecutions for the offence of food‐drugging which the more enlightened Local Authorities may be willing to institute, since it can no longer be alleged that the question of preservatives is still “under the consideration” of the Departmental Committee, and since it cannot be contended that the recommendations made leave any room for doubt as to the Committee's conclusions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Soo-Young Hong, Julia Torquati and Victoria J. Molfese

The importance of early and developmentally appropriate science education is increasingly recognized. Consequently, creation of common guidelines and standards in early childhood…

Abstract

The importance of early and developmentally appropriate science education is increasingly recognized. Consequently, creation of common guidelines and standards in early childhood science education has begun (National Research Council (NRC), 2012), and researchers, practitioners, and policy makers have shown great interest in aligning professional development with the new guidelines and standards. There are some important issues that need to be addressed in order to successfully implement guidelines and make progress toward accomplishing standards. Early childhood teachers have expressed a lack of confidence in teaching science and nature (Torquati, Cutler, Gilkerson, & Sarver, in press) and have limited science and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (Appleton, 2008). These are critical issues because teachers’ subject-matter knowledge is a robust predictor of student learning outcomes (Enfield & Rogers, 2009; Kennedy, 1998; Wilson, Floden, & Ferrini-Mundy, 2002) and is seen as a critical step toward improving K-12 student achievement (National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching for the 21st Century (NCMST), 2000; NRC, 2000). We argue that the same is true of preschool teachers.

This chapter discusses: (a) theories and practices in early childhood science education (i.e., preschool through 3rd grade) in relation to teaching for conceptual change, (b) research on methods of professional development in early childhood science education, and (c) innovative approaches to integrating scientific practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas with early childhood professional development.

Details

Learning Across the Early Childhood Curriculum
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-700-9

Keywords

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