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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Richard S. Bolan

This paper is concerned with enlarging the traditional view of rationality that has dominated management and planning in modern times. The inquiry begins by re‐examining…

Abstract

This paper is concerned with enlarging the traditional view of rationality that has dominated management and planning in modern times. The inquiry begins by re‐examining Weber’s discussion of rationality as interpreted by contemporary analysts. Weber saw rationality as multi‐faceted and included notions of a social rationality involving more than simple instrumental or “practical” rationality. Habermas’ ideas concerning communicative action are then introduced as the basis for parsing out Weber’s differing conceptions of rationality based on the dual underlying motivations of pursuing social agreement along with technical or instrumental goals. In dialectical fashion, the paper introduces the concept of adaptive rationality involving a synthetic form of reason that mediates between substantive, or social, rationality and instrumental, or technical, rationality. This adaptive form of reason is seen as the heart of management and planning and requires a combined technical, political and moral imagination in the service of creating new forms of social practice and marshaling both the collective will and resources for their fulfillment. Thus, the paper argues for a wider conception of rationality that explicitly acknowledges social norms and the distribution of power and concludes with the hope of a renewed focus of research for a richer understanding of rational action.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

John Richard Thomas Bustard, Peter Bolan, Adrian Devine and Karise Hutchinson

The use of “special events” as an attractor for destinations in the smart tourism paradigm has been suggested as one element of an effective destination strategy. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of “special events” as an attractor for destinations in the smart tourism paradigm has been suggested as one element of an effective destination strategy. This study aims to create new understandings of this potentiality by exploring an event from a participant perspective in smart tourism contexts by creating a model integrating factors impacting the smart event experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted five online focus groups by using Facebook secret groups to engage spectators of an international sports event. Discussions focussed on the digital event experience with particular reference to the event app. A subsequent interpretative phenomenological analysis facilitated the examination of how people make sense of this digital phenomenon and the impact on the overall event experience.

Findings

The findings demonstrate an increasing demand for real-time event integrative information, with more immersive and augmented experiences often sought by users. This has significant implications for the management of the digital event experience for all event stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in its analysis of the smart event experience because of the use of a purposive sample from the International NW200 Event in Northern Ireland, which may limit the generalisability of research findings.

Originality/value

The study therefore, meets a critical gap in existent literature by providing the first event experience model in a smart tourism context and presenting the interlocking elements through the 4P’s (people, processes, personalisation and places) and 7R’s (rituals, realms, realities, renewal, review, relational and resourcing) of digital event experience.

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Book part
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Chin How (Norman) Goh, Michael D. Short, Nanthi S. Bolan and Christopher P. Saint

Biosolids, the residual solids from wastewater treatment operations and once considered a waste product by the industry, are now becoming increasingly recognised as a…

Abstract

Biosolids, the residual solids from wastewater treatment operations and once considered a waste product by the industry, are now becoming increasingly recognised as a multifunctional resource with growing opportunities for marketable use. This shift in attitude towards biosolids management is spurred on by increasing volatility in energy, fertilizer and commodity markets as well as moves by the global community towards mitigating global warming and the effects of climate change. This chapter will provide an overview of current global biosolids practices (paired with a number of Australian examples) as well as discuss potential future uses of biosolids. Additionally, present and future risks and opportunities of biosolids use are highlighted, including potential policy implications.

Details

Unmaking Waste in Production and Consumption: Towards the Circular Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-620-4

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Richard Butler

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the extent to which film locations affect the decision making of tourists and overall attractiveness of film locations as tourist…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the extent to which film locations affect the decision making of tourists and overall attractiveness of film locations as tourist destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the relative appeal of fictional and authentic film locations with reference to the literature and film case study examples.

Findings

Arguably, the attractiveness of an actual location shown in a film is greater than a location portrayed by a film, and when tourists do visit film locations in considerable numbers, the impacts are not always beneficial.

Practical implications

The paper uses examples to explore the scope and related impacts of film‐induced tourism.

Originality/value

The paper draws on a wide range of examples to highlight the implications of fictional and authentic locations in films.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Noëlle O'Connor

The purpose of this paper is to explain why the film‐induced tourism sector is growing and outline the key questions that are likely to affect the future development of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain why the film‐induced tourism sector is growing and outline the key questions that are likely to affect the future development of this sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The theme issue is profiled and the purpose and approach of each article explained in the context of the overall strategic question: how can the film‐inducted tourism phenomenon be sustainably managed?

Findings

The paper concludes that there is both a need and an opportunity for dialogue and interchange between practitioners and academics.

Practical implications

The paper explores the key issues affecting the growth of film‐induced tourism around the globe.

Originality/value

The paper identifies and explores facets of the relatively new film‐induced tourism phenomenon.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-617-5

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Case study
Publication date: 11 April 2017

Russell Walker

Read any news report on the housing market, and inevitably it will include facts or figures from the real estate data giant Zillow.com. The company initially set out to…

Abstract

Read any news report on the housing market, and inevitably it will include facts or figures from the real estate data giant Zillow.com. The company initially set out to solve two key economic frictions in the real estate industry information asymmetry and the principal-agent problem by empowering users to access real-time housing data and eliminating the need for realtors. The company soon realized, however, that American homeowners and buyers were not willing to give up the traditional real estate agent model and changed course. In the end, Zillow decided to join rather than replace the middlemen in the real estate industry.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Kim Ramus and Niels Asger Nielsen

To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and…

Abstract

Purpose

To use the theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework to explore in depth the range of beliefs held by consumers about internet shopping in general and internet grocery shopping in particular.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven focus group interviews, four in the United Kingdom and three in Denmark, were conducted among consumers with different degrees of experience with internet grocery shopping. This diversification of respondents was chosen to capture a broad range of the consumer beliefs that predict intentions to buy groceries online or not. The TPB framework was used to construct the interview guide that was followed in all focus groups.

Findings

An unexpected result of the explorative study was that the seven groups consisting of more or less experienced internet shoppers differed only little in their pool of beliefs (outcome and control beliefs). Beliefs about internet grocery shopping, positive as well as negative, were remarkably congruent across groups. In the minds of consumers, internet grocery shopping is an advantage compared with conventional grocery shopping in terms of convenience, product range and price. Disadvantages, which could act as mental barriers, are, for instance, the risk of receiving inferior quality groceries and the loss of the recreational aspect of grocery shopping.

Research limitations/implications

An important potential limitation of this research is the choice of focus groups as research methodology, which can prevent the elicitation of certain types of beliefs. If important beliefs concern issues of a more sensitive, personal character they are not likely to be mentioned in a focus group. Another limitation is the explorative nature of the research, which makes it impossible to attach weights to the importance of the elicited beliefs in predicting internet shopping behavior.

Practical implications

The findings could be used to direct attention to consumer beliefs about internet grocery shopping which have the potential of acting as barriers to this line of e‐commerce.

Originality/value

To shed some light on the role of consumers in an underperforming and understudied branch of internet retailing. Barriers in the consumers' minds to shop for groceries online are identified using an established theoretical framework.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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