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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Philip C. Wright and Gary D. Geroy

Outlines how human competency engineering can be used as a change maangement or organizational development tool, based upon studies conducted in Canada, Hong Kong and Indonesia…

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Abstract

Outlines how human competency engineering can be used as a change maangement or organizational development tool, based upon studies conducted in Canada, Hong Kong and Indonesia. Suggests that a change model based on the practical application of social science and physical science concepts can be applied over several cultures.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Ricky C.M. Chan and Philip C. Wright

Explores how easy (or otherwise) it is for small businesses to take advantage of the huge markets opening up in the People’s Republic of China. Profiles a Hong Kong‐based office…

Abstract

Explores how easy (or otherwise) it is for small businesses to take advantage of the huge markets opening up in the People’s Republic of China. Profiles a Hong Kong‐based office furniture manufacturer and distributor (Logic Office Supplies) as an example of successful market penetration. Outlines the research methodology used ‐ field research conducted in 1992 and 1993, which looked at the historical development of the market, the industry size and profile, the growth of private enterprise, government relations, the legal environment and an analysis of the competition. Explains why the company chose to follow a four‐pronged entry strategy and how they implemented that strategy. Infers that the company’s success was largely due to a careful choice of partners. Points out that sales increased from HK$40 million in 1989 to HK$400 million in 1994. Applies this successful approach to drawing up a conceptual framework for smaller businesses wishing to expand into China. Talks about stage of entry, mode of entry, and whether to opt for permanent representation or joint ventures. Provides a model showing five stages in the process of expanding into China. Concludes that it is not easy to expand into China and that the best route for small businesses to follow is to sell through trading houses and distributorships.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Philip C. Wright and G.D. Geroy

There is mounting evidence to suggest that business schools are not meeting the needs of either the business community, or their students. Evidence comes from sources as diverse…

Abstract

There is mounting evidence to suggest that business schools are not meeting the needs of either the business community, or their students. Evidence comes from sources as diverse as the popular press and AACSB reports. This article outlines a student‐centred, alternative business education strategy, based on the ISO‐9000 concept. Our suggestions include a redefinition of the role of research, the enhancement of choice and the inclusion of continuous learning requirements within a system in which the stakeholders have major input.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Jane W.H. Moy, Vivienne W.M. Luk and Philip C. Wright

Highlights Hong Kong’s many small but thriving businesses which provide most of the workforce (60 per cent) on the island. Investigates the effects of the SARS crisis and the…

Abstract

Highlights Hong Kong’s many small but thriving businesses which provide most of the workforce (60 per cent) on the island. Investigates the effects of the SARS crisis and the economic turndown of 1997, following the handover to Chinese rule. Uses tables to show the local feeling on what is wrong and the possible solutions. Tries to show the various ways of an improvement in the fortunes of the young people via an educational bent.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Philip C. Wright and V.T. Nguyen

Explores, using face‐to‐face interviews, the perceptions of managers in state‐owned enterprises in Vietnam, as to their strategic plans. Given that many of these enterprises will…

1482

Abstract

Explores, using face‐to‐face interviews, the perceptions of managers in state‐owned enterprises in Vietnam, as to their strategic plans. Given that many of these enterprises will have to be privatized, sometime in the future, it is surprising that little thought has been given to this eventuality. Suggests that the massive nature of the state sector (40‐50 per cent of the economy) will make it difficult for policy makers to enact change. Outlines a macro‐economic formula for planned, gradual conversion, keeping this reality in mind.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Philip C. Wright and Frederick K.C. Tao

Using the example of a “successful” managerial training programme as a starting point, this article illustrates how training addresses only the routine, or core aspects of the…

1382

Abstract

Using the example of a “successful” managerial training programme as a starting point, this article illustrates how training addresses only the routine, or core aspects of the small business manager’s job. Thus, training is discussed in terms of where this activity should fit into the developmental paradigm. Then, utilizing recent advances in executive coaching techniques, a different learning model is created, one that builds on traditional training, but focuses on behavioural change.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Eli Winston Baker and Philip C. Wright

Uses the term “McJob” to convey that working either full‐time or part‐time at McDonald’s is one of the most common occupations in the 1990s. Defines a McJob as a job requiring…

Abstract

Uses the term “McJob” to convey that working either full‐time or part‐time at McDonald’s is one of the most common occupations in the 1990s. Defines a McJob as a job requiring little training, usually in the service sector. Investigates the low‐skill workplace through six case studies and a survey consisting of personal interviews with the individuals in Fredericton, Canada. Reveals a large number of incompetent, morally bankrupt and illegal labour practices, particularly as low‐skill workers have minimal recourse to legal processes. Indicates that conventional employment law simply does not extend to low‐skill employment and that part‐time and minimum wage employees, as well as being denied legal rights, are completely at the whim of the employer. Proposes an Ombudsman should operate independently of government, ranking employers according to their treatment of employees, publicizing offences and unfair practices, to shame bad employers and act as an impetus for change.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Ricky Szeto, Philip C. Wright and Edward Cheng

Business ethics has become a controversial topic as China integrates more closely into the world economy and there are signs of convergence within global professions. The purpose…

4379

Abstract

Purpose

Business ethics has become a controversial topic as China integrates more closely into the world economy and there are signs of convergence within global professions. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to study guanxi and business ethics in China within the context of social capital development, with a view to creating a more balanced interpretation that provides insights for Westerners wishing to conduct business in China.

Design/methodology/approach

In terms of methodology, the work is based on the results of a recent survey conducted among Chinese executives in southern China.

Findings

The major findings suggest that the processes of developing social capital and the nurturing of company‐to‐company relationships need to be planned carefully. Thus, no one individual should be responsible for the China connection, although the appointment of a team leader is essential, otherwise the Chinese side would become confused. Negotiations always are to be conducted on a team basis and always approved at the highest levels in the corporate structure.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this paper include the difficulties of obtaining any research sample in China. Thus, we refer to the work of Weiss, (Learning From Strangers, Free Press, New York.) and use a snowball sample.

Originality/value

The practical implications of the paper are that guanxi (a type of social capital), can be managed and that corruption does not have to result from the use of guanxi‐based relationships. Thus, the originality arises out of the practical implications, in that for the first time, Western concepts of social capital and Asian concepts of guanxi have been compared, leading to practical recommendations for Western managers.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Philip C. Wright, Mike Berrell and Marianne Gloet

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of the Chinese cultural architecture on motivating workplace behaviour for enhanced productivity in Chinese workplaces.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of the Chinese cultural architecture on motivating workplace behaviour for enhanced productivity in Chinese workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the Chinese cultural architecture and presents a cursory review of the substantive literature in this field. Based on this review, a conceptual framework for managing within Chinese organizations is presented, based on the first‐hand experience in the field as well as anecdotal evidence provided by practitioners in international management.

Findings

In the light of research, which suggests that the realities about motivation in the context of Chinese workplaces are more complicated than originally thought, this paper moves away from viewing Chinese workplace behaviour from a purely systems‐based perspective. Although ideas about collectivism and individualism certainly explain important aspects of workplace behaviour, an orientation to practicality and the emotive side of life in Chinese workplaces also affects behaviour in quite subtle ways.

Research limitations/implications

While the development of a conceptual framework for practicing managers provides a guide to managing in China, work that is more empirical is necessary to test the resilience of the framework.

Practical implications

The paper offers practical steps to improve the performance and productivity of both managers and employees in Chinese organizations.

Originality/value

The framework presented utilizes the conventional collectivism/individualism dichotomy with notions of practicality and emotion in Chinese workplaces. This is one potential step forward to the development of a more motivating management style in China.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Philip C. Wright, W.F. Szeto and Gary D. Geory

Using the Chinese, family‐owned manufacturing firm as a primary example, Asian styles of management are examined in light of their ability to compete in a free‐trade environment…

7683

Abstract

Using the Chinese, family‐owned manufacturing firm as a primary example, Asian styles of management are examined in light of their ability to compete in a free‐trade environment. It is concluded that traditional, authoritarian, relationship‐based management concepts are not likely to fare well in fast‐changing global arenas. Nevertheless, a model for expanding into international markets is presented, with the realization that most Chinese‐managed firms would be advised to adopt regional rather than global strategies.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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