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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Julian N. Trollor, Claire Eagleson, Janelle Weise and Roderick McKay

The purpose of this paper is to describe and critique the methodology used to develop a core competency framework for mental health professionals working with people with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and critique the methodology used to develop a core competency framework for mental health professionals working with people with an intellectual disability and co-occurring mental ill health.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-phase, multi-method design was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data, including a scoping survey, modified online Delphi, and consultation with multiple stakeholders. The implementation phase involved a launch forum and workshop, toolkit development, and evaluation strategy.

Findings

Results from the scoping survey and consultation process informed the development of a core competency framework with 11 domains. An accompanying toolkit was also developed with practical guidance to assist with the implementation of the core competencies. In total, 93 professionals attended the launch forum, and the framework has been downloaded 998 times during the first year it has been available.

Research limitations/implications

Detailed information specific to each profession cannot be included when a whole of workforce approach is used. The ways in which to use the framework in conjunction with other core competency frameworks is discussed.

Practical implications

This framework can be utilised by mental health workers including clinicians, managers, service developers, and educators, from multiple professional backgrounds. The approach taken can also be used by others to develop similar frameworks.

Originality/value

This is the first core competency framework, to the authors’ knowledge, specifically designed for public mental health professionals from varied backgrounds working with people with an intellectual disability. Consulting with multiple stakeholders, not just experts, elicited new information that may otherwise have been overlooked.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Analisa Smythe, Catharine Jenkins, Pete Bentham and Jan Oyebode

– The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of a competency framework for staff working in a specialist service for people with dementia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of a competency framework for staff working in a specialist service for people with dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative and purposive methodology was used and included focus groups, questionnaires and interviews. Content analysis together with synthesis of literature was used to generate the competency framework.

Findings

A competency framework was developed with eight main clusters. These were: skills for working effectively with people with dementia and their families; advanced assessment skills; enhancing psychological well-being; understanding behaviours; enhancing physical well-being; clinical leadership; understanding ethical and legal issues; and demonstrating skills in personal and professional development.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to include service user perspectives.

Practical implications

The framework could be implemented in practice by managers, health care professionals and training providers as a tool to identify strengths and limitations in knowledge skills and attitudes and to identify areas for competency development through specific training.

Originality/value

The competency framework contributes to the development of a training curriculum for staff working within a specialist service.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2014

Kim Aitken and Kathryn von Treuer

The purpose of this paper is to describe a two-part study that has explored the organisational and leadership competencies required for successful service integration…

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3306

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a two-part study that has explored the organisational and leadership competencies required for successful service integration within a health consortia in Australia. Preliminary organisational and leadership competency frameworks were developed to serve as reference points as the consortia it expanded to cater for increased service demand in the midst of significant health reform.

Design/methodology/approach

The study design is outlined, which involved literature reviews and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders to ascertain the key determinants of successful service integration at both organisational and leadership levels.

Findings

The literature reviews revealed little existing research specifically focused on the organisational and leadership competencies that underpin successful service integration. The themes from the literature reviews and semi-structured interviews informed the preliminary organisational and leadership competency frameworks. Both frameworks are outlined in the paper. Key determinants of successful service integration – at both an organisational and individual leadership level – are also presented.

Research limitations/implications

This is a one-organisation case study and the competency frameworks presented are preliminary. However, the study findings provide a foundation for further research focusing on the longer-term success of service integration.

Originality/value

Service integration in health is a new and emerging area, and there is little extant research exploring the organisational and leadership competencies underpinning its success. The competency frameworks presented in the paper may be of interest to other consortia and organisations engaged in service integration and other forms of merger and collaboration.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2018

Aggeliki Tsohou and Philipp Holtkamp

Information security policies (ISPs) are used by organizations to communicate rules on the use of information systems (IS). Research studies show that compliance with the…

Abstract

Purpose

Information security policies (ISPs) are used by organizations to communicate rules on the use of information systems (IS). Research studies show that compliance with the ISPs is not a straightforward issue and that several factors influence individual behavior toward ISP compliance, such as security awareness or individual perception of security threats. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the competencies associated with users’ ISP compliance behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to reveal the competencies that are associated with the users’ ISP compliance behavior, the authors systematically analyze the ISP compliance literature and the authors develop an ISP compliance competency model. The authors then target to explore if IS users are equipped with these competencies; to do so, the authors analyze professional competence models from various industry sectors and compare the competencies that they include with the developed ISP compliance competencies.

Findings

The authors identify the competencies associated with ISP compliance and the authors provide evidence on the lack of attention in information security responsibilities demonstrated in professional competence frameworks.

Research limitations/implications

ISP compliance research has focused on identifying the antecedents of ISP compliance behavior. The authors offer an ISP compliance competency model and guide researchers in investigating the issue further by focusing on the professional competencies that are necessary for IS users.

Practical implications

The findings offer new contributions to practitioners by highlighting the lack of attention on the information security responsibilities demonstrated in professional competence frameworks. The paper also provides implications for the design of information security awareness programs and information security management systems in organizations.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the paper is the first study that addresses ISP compliance behavior from a professional competence perspective.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Anna Sutton and Sara Watson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the utility of an organisation-wide competency framework, linking competency ratings at selection to later development needs and…

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3199

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the utility of an organisation-wide competency framework, linking competency ratings at selection to later development needs and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Candidates’ scores at a management selection event were compared to their performance appraisal scores on the same competencies six to 12 months later (n=58). Scores on numeracy and profit and loss tests were also collected at the selection event and related to subsequent performance (n=207) and development needs.

Findings

Competency ratings at performance appraisal were significantly lower than at selection interview. Correlations between ratings at interview and at performance appraisal were generally weak, though one (Understanding the Business) showed significant relationships with five of the seven performance appraisal competencies. In addition, competency ratings were related to employee turnover and managerial development needs.

Research limitations/implications

Although competencies were clearly defined, inter-rater variations may have occurred which obscure the relationships. However, it is of interest that a single competency at selection (Understanding the Business) seems to have the greatest effect on performance, employment outcome and development needs.

Practical implications

A competency framework that is embedded in both selection and performance ratings can provide the organisation with a clearer understanding of what determines managerial success, as well as informing better selection decisions. This study also raises the issue that performance ratings may be influenced more by a manager's ability to understand the business than by any other competencies.

Originality/value

The use of a longitudinal design provides unique evidence of the relationship between competency ratings at selection and later performance, employment outcome and development needs.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2018

Zhanming Liang, Peter F. Howard, Sandra Leggat and Timothy Bartram

The importance of managerial competencies in monitoring and improving the performance of organisational leaders and managers is well accepted. Different processes have…

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1121

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of managerial competencies in monitoring and improving the performance of organisational leaders and managers is well accepted. Different processes have been used to identify and develop competency frameworks or models for healthcare managers around the world to meet different contextual needs. The purpose of the paper is to introduce a validated process in management competency identification and development applied in Australia – a process leading to a management competency framework with associated behavioural items that can be used to measure core management competencies of health service managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The management competency framework development study incorporated both qualitative and quantitative methods, implemented in four stages, including job description analysis, focus group discussions and online surveys.

Findings

The study confirmed that the four-stage process could identify management competencies and the framework developed is considered reliable and valid for developing a management competency assessment tool that can measure management competence amongst managers in health organisations. In addition, supervisors of health service managers could use the framework to distinguish perceived superior and average performers among managers in health organisations.

Practical implications

Developing the core competencies of health service managers is important for management performance improvement and talent management. The six core management competencies identified can be used to guide the design professional development activities for health service managers.

Originality/value

The validated management competency identification and development process can be applied in other countries and different industrial contexts to identify core management competency requirements.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Christine Carter, Jennifer Bray, Kate Read, Karen Harrison-Dening, Rachel Thompson and Dawn Brooker

The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of developing a contemporary competency framework for admiral nurses in dementia care.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of developing a contemporary competency framework for admiral nurses in dementia care.

Design/methodology/approach

Information and evidence was gathered from research and policy literature regarding competencies to deliver advanced practice within dementia care. An online survey completed by 75 admiral nurses with follow-up interviews clarified current practice across the range of service contexts in which they work. A focus group (FG) of people living with dementia and family carers, and a reference group of practitioners helped to develop a competency framework which was refined through FGs with admiral nurses working in different areas.

Findings

The literature review, survey and interviews provided a framework grounded in up-to-date evidence and contemporary practice. There was broad agreement in the literature and the practitioners’ priorities regarding the core competencies of advanced practice, with constructive suggestions for making the framework useable in practice. This resulted in a robust framework articulating the competencies of admiral nurses which could be used for continuous professional development.

Originality/value

Engaging the admiral nurses ensured the competencies were contemporary, succinct and applicable within practice, and also cultivated a sense of ownership. Developing the competency framework with the admiral nurses not for them provides an approach which may have value for professionals undertaking a similar process in their specialist area. It is anticipated the competency framework will provide further evidence of the benefits of specialist nurse support for families affected by dementia.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2021

Erastus Karanja and Laurell C. Malone

Although project management (PM) continues to rise in popularity, there is still a significant PM talent deficit, leading to more challenged or failing projects. To lower…

Abstract

Purpose

Although project management (PM) continues to rise in popularity, there is still a significant PM talent deficit, leading to more challenged or failing projects. To lower the PM talent deficit and mitigate the higher project failure rates, academic institutions have been developing PM curriculums aimed at inculcating a repertoire of competencies to the potential project managers. In developing an ideal well-rounded PM curriculum, academic institutions occasionally engage the input of industry partners and governing entities. The study aims to (1) compare the competencies in one of the leading industry competency model and framework (PMI Talent Triangle) to the competencies in the PM course syllabi learning outcomes, (2) determine the extent to which these two sets of PM competencies are aligned and (3) and explore avenues for improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a purposeful sampling method to gather PM course syllabi. The PM competencies data are gleaned from the syllabi using the content analysis method. Thereafter, QSR NVivo qualitative statistical software is used to summarize and analyze the competency data from the learning outcomes.

Findings

The results reveal that most of the PM competencies in the course syllabi fall under the technical PM domain. Specifically, the top three competency elements in each domain are technical PM domain (PM skills, tools and techniques, schedule management and cost estimation/budget), leadership domain (team-building, verbal/written communication and problem-solving) and strategic and business management domain (strategic planning, analysis and alignment, benefits management and realization, customer relationship and satisfaction).

Research limitations/implications

The study investigates the alignment of the PM course competencies with competency domains in the PMI Talent Triangle, a global competence model that is well aligned with other global competence models such as the APM Competence Framework, the ICB4 Individual Competence Baseline and the PROMA3.

Practical implications

The results from this study provide guidelines useful in informing PM curricula re/design, as well as the inculcation of knowledge, skills, tools, techniques and behaviors needed for effective PM.

Social implications

The PM curriculum can be improved by partnering with PM industry leaders who can serve as advisors to the academy on industry needs, direction and emerging innovations that can inform PM learning outcomes, PM curricular design and the development of quality PM talent. The academy and the industry are encouraged to actively strive for mutual partnerships where PM professionals and academicians serve on each other's advisory boards. Also, the academy can partner with the industry professionals by developing curriculum resources such as case studies that bring the real-life PM applications to the classroom.

Originality/value

This study is motivated by the call for research studies that provide a holistic picture of the desired PM competencies and an exploration and definition of the educational needs in the PM curriculum.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-035-7

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Sonia Bharwani and Parvaiz Talib

It is crucial for hospitality organisations to develop sustainable leadership by regularly re-evaluating the competencies and skills required by their senior managers and…

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4973

Abstract

Purpose

It is crucial for hospitality organisations to develop sustainable leadership by regularly re-evaluating the competencies and skills required by their senior managers and leaders. In the context of this strategic talent management imperative, this paper aims to identify and map competencies required for the pivotal position of a hotel general manager to develop a holistic and relevant leadership competency framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Through secondary research, this study undertakes a detailed literature review of competency and leadership studies in the context of the hospitality industry to distil the essential competencies and skills required by a general manager.

Findings

This study proposes a leadership competency model for hospitality organisations in the form of a 43-item competency framework for hotel general managers categorised into four broad dimensions – cognitive competencies (knowledge), functional competencies (skills), social competencies (attitudes and behaviours) and meta competencies (motives and traits).

Practical implications

The proposed competency model, once empirically tested for robustness, could serve as a blueprint for hospitality organisations to develop their own organisation-specific competency framework for senior leadership that could prove to be a keystone for integrated talent management practices. Further, educationists and trainers could use the findings of this study as inputs in designing curricula and pedagogical interventions to meet the industry’s future needs and expectations with regards to competencies of senior managers.

Originality/value

By aggregating competencies from earlier studies and synthesising and categorising them in accordance with a contemporary, hospitality industry-relevant typology, a comprehensive competency model specific for hotel general managers has been proposed.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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