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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Peter Katopes

The purpose of this essay is to argue the importance of the humanities as a problem‐solving “system”, one which has for thousands of years provided humankind with the tools to

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this essay is to argue the importance of the humanities as a problem‐solving “system”, one which has for thousands of years provided humankind with the tools to make reasoned decisions about complex problems in an ever‐changing world.

Design/methodology/approach

This essay places the idea of complexity within a historical and philosophical context.

Findings

The rise of new technologies has resulted in the notion that human beings are no longer capable of addressing complex problems. Too dogmatic a reliance upon technology, however, instead of leading to clarity, can lead to chaos and confusion.

Social implications

One of the few remaining “big structures” which retains a significant degree of public trust is higher education. If we continue to devalue the one area of study – the humanities – which has as its ultimate purpose precisely the analysis of “complex issues” – in favor of quasi‐human systemic solutions or an alteration of the “epistemology” of education, we will surely render ourselves irrelevant.

Originality/value

This is an original approach and an original piece of work.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Xuemei Tian and Bill Martin

– The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the links between value creation and university business models in a dynamic global higher education marketplace.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the links between value creation and university business models in a dynamic global higher education marketplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines primary and secondary research to critique the current “export led” business models of universities in a context of growing competition and conflicting perceptions of value among various stakeholders.

Findings

In a context of market turbulence, funding crises and concerns over competition, complexity and sustainability, there are concerns over the longer term viability of current university business models, reflected in indications of differentiation among providers.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has emerged from the primary research into business models in book publishing (Australian Research Council) and subsequent book on digital publishing (Ashgate Publishers). Here, the authors have applied the same model building process to what has been learned about university business models from the wider literature. While this means that much of the research is secondary, there is still an original element in the model building and analysis processes.

Practical implications

The paper has practical implications for university planners seeking to review or replace their business models in an increasingly complex and challenging global marketplace.

Social implications

The paper has implications for a number of stakeholders – university managers and their staff, business partners, students, government and professional bodies. In a wider sense it relates to concerns over complexity, social responsibility and sustainability at both organisational and community levels.

Originality/value

University business models have received relatively little attention in the management literature, and frequently this has involved little more than allusions to business models than detailed treatment of their structure and content. This paper fills a gap by providing a number of alternative business models for universities. Although the broad context is that of Australian universities, the analysis is applicable to the circumstances of other countries.

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