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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Peder Hyllengren, Sofia Nilsson, Alicia Ohlsson, Kjell Kallenberg, Gudmund Waaler and Gerry Larsson

The purpose of this paper is to identify and gain a deeper understanding of environmental, organizational, and group conditions, and leadership-related issues in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and gain a deeper understanding of environmental, organizational, and group conditions, and leadership-related issues in particular, in severely stressful situations involving a moral stressor faced by military and police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

A combined deductive and inductive approach was used, and in total 23 military and police officers, all having experience of morally difficult decisions during severely stressful conditions, were interviewed.

Findings

A hierarchical conceptual framework of contextual characteristics was developed. The environmental, organizational, leadership-related, and group aspects identified in this study on morally stressful situations resemble findings from general research on work and stress. However, a stronger emphasis was put on leaders’ handling of values and his or her ability to confront senior management when needed.

Practical implications

The results suggest that well-documented methods aimed at the prevention of, and recovery from, work-related stress, also can be used in the case of extreme situations involving moral stressors.

Originality/value

The interplay between leadership and extreme situations involving moral stressors is, to the best of the knowledge, understudied.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Peder Hyllengren, Gerry Larsson, Maria Fors, Misa Sjöberg, Jarle Eid and Olav Kjellevold Olsen

The study seeks to illuminate factors that benefit, or do not benefit, the development of swift trust towards leaders in temporary military groups.

Abstract

Purpose

The study seeks to illuminate factors that benefit, or do not benefit, the development of swift trust towards leaders in temporary military groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The study group comprised 50 Norwegian cadets, 34 Norwegian military officers, 317 Swedish cadets, and 190 Swedish military officers. Data were gathered using a questionnaire which included two open‐ended questions on aspects which contribute to swift trust (and lack thereof) towards leaders, as well as Likert‐scale questions on temporary group characteristics, and a personality inventory.

Findings

A qualitative clustering analysis of the open‐ended responses yielded a hierarchical model of aspects which contribute to swift trust (or the lack thereof) with the following two superior categories: individual‐related characteristics such as emotional stability and relationship‐related characteristics such as encourage involvement and creativity. The latter superior category covaried most strongly with ratings of the groups' performance.

Research limitations/implications

The results need to be substantiated by further research in other professional groups and cultures.

Practical implications

The findings can help leaders of temporary groups become more conscious of how they may affect the group members' development of swift trust.

Originality/value

The hierarchical and detailed model of aspects which contribute to swift trust in leaders of temporary groups is new.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Gerry Larsson and Peder Hyllengren

The purpose of this paper is to further the theoretical understanding of leadership in emergency type organisations by modelling contextual aspects which are assumed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further the theoretical understanding of leadership in emergency type organisations by modelling contextual aspects which are assumed to influence it.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical analysis followed by an operationalisation of key concepts and two small‐scale empirical cross‐sectional tests.

Findings

Contextual conditions at the group, organisation, and environmental levels that are assumed to influence leadership in emergency type organisations were modelled in lower‐ to higher‐extent bipolar dimensions. An empirical test involving Scandinavian military officers (n=57) and Swedish health care (ambulance) professionals (n=39) yielded profiles for leaders at three different hierarchical levels during severely demanding operations: field‐level group/team leaders; field‐level commanders/managers; and high‐level strategic commanders/managers. Considerable differences were found between the three profiles on scales designed to measure environmental and more structure‐related organisational conditions. Almost no differences were noted on “softer” aspects such as organisational culture and small group characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses only on traditional hierarchical organisations that are designed to function in extreme conditions (the armed forces and acute health care).

Practical implications

If empirically further tested and proved valid, the suggested model could be of value in leadership and organisational development efforts.

Originality/value

The theoretical approach is new. The presented operationalisations open up for full‐model tests of leadership models based on an interactional person‐by‐situation paradigm.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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