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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Graziella Fornengo and Elisabetta Ottoz

The aim of this work is to investigate the risk of anti competitive behaviour implied by temporary groups of service providers. The point bears policy implications as…

Abstract

The aim of this work is to investigate the risk of anti competitive behaviour implied by temporary groups of service providers. The point bears policy implications as local authorities, following European Union directives, have stressed the role of such alliances in the public procurement of services. We first summarize the fragmented literature on temporary horizontal alliances in public works and services. We then deal with a case study on local public transport in order to evaluate the performance of temporary groups of service providers. The coopetitive perspective is finally discussed as an explanation stressing that, within firms’ groups, both processes of value creation and value sharing take place.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2020

Anette Kaagaard Kristensen and Martin Lund Kristensen

This paper aims to highlight the social dynamics associated with the interaction between temporary and permanent organizational members in non-work-related situations…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the social dynamics associated with the interaction between temporary and permanent organizational members in non-work-related situations. This view contrasts with previous studies which predominantly focus on work-related situations. Inspired by Goffman's dramaturgical metaphor, a perspective which emphasizes the influence of social regions on group membership as well as the ritual foundation of everyday social interactions is developed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper’s methodological foundation is a constructivist grounded theory study of 15 undergraduate nursing students' experiences as temporary members during their clinical placements.

Findings

Temporary members arrive at their new organization with an expectation of attending non-work-related situations on similar terms as permanent members. However, they do not expect to be treated as new colleagues. They experience being excluded and ignored, which makes them feel humiliated, denied recognition and deprived of their dignity.

Originality/value

Illuminating social dynamics related to backstage access provides valuable insights to studies of the relationship between temporary and permanent organizational members. Furthermore, redirecting the analytical focus from social dynamics associated with work-related situations to non-work-related ones provides new perspectives on moral exclusion by emphasizing the ritual foundation and its close connection to moral concepts such as dignity and recognition.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Ulla Kinnunen, Anne Mäkikangas, Saija Mauno, Katri Siponen and Jouko Nätti

The purpose of the present study is to examine how perceived employability relates to job exhaustion, psychological symptoms and self‐rated job performance in involuntary…

4018

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to examine how perceived employability relates to job exhaustion, psychological symptoms and self‐rated job performance in involuntary and voluntary temporary employees compared to permanent employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a cross‐sectional design using a sample of university teachers and researchers (n=1,014) from two Finnish universities. Of the sample, 40 percent (n=408) are permanent employees, 49 percent (n=495) involuntary and 11 percent (n=111) voluntary temporary employees. Most respondents (54 percent) have education above a Master's degree, the average age is 43 years, and 58 percent are women.

Findings

The results of general linear model analyses show that perceived employability promotes favorable outcomes among all respondents. However, the negative relationship between perceived employability and job exhaustion and psychological symptoms is stronger among voluntary than among involuntary temporary employees.

Originality/value

The study indicates that although perceived employability seems to be important to all employees, involuntary temporary employees benefit least from high perceived employability in terms of individual well‐being.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Courtney von Hippel and Elise K. Kalokerinos

The purpose of this research is to examine the causes and consequences of permanent employees' perceptions that temporary employees are a threat to their job security.

1668

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the causes and consequences of permanent employees' perceptions that temporary employees are a threat to their job security.

Design/methodology/approach

The underlying theme of the current research is that an important reason why temporary employees can disrupt the work environment is that permanent workers can perceive them as threatening. A survey of permanent (n=99) and temporary employees (n=62) was used to test hypotheses. Multiple sources were used to assess permanent employees' treatment of their temporary co‐workers.

Findings

Permanent employees felt more threatened when they perceived the layoff policy and motives for using temporary workers as inappropriate, and when the position of temporary employees was equal to or above their own rank. The relationship between these feelings of threat and their behavior toward the temporary employees was moderated by temporary employee type. Specifically, permanent employees who did not feel threatened treated involuntary temporary employees better, but permanent employees who felt threatened treated voluntary temporary employees better.

Research limitations/implications

The sampling procedure limits the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

This paper helps illuminate the dynamics between temporary and permanent workers to enable organizations to decide when temporary employees will be helpful and when they will be harmful. The results provide specific recommendations for when different types of temporary employees should be used.

Originality/value

This paper applies psychological and organizational theories to the workplace to uncover when blended workforces are likely to be problematic.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Moshe Krausz

The study examined differences between voluntary and involuntary Canadian (N = 224) temporary help employees (THEs). The hypotheses stated that compared to involuntary…

1690

Abstract

The study examined differences between voluntary and involuntary Canadian (N = 224) temporary help employees (THEs). The hypotheses stated that compared to involuntary THEs, voluntary THEs, particularly those who see it as a long‐term employment arrangement, are more satisfied and involved and less stressed. Results supported most of the hypotheses. Long‐term THEs were higher in overall satisfaction and in two of three measures of facet satisfaction. They were also lower in role conflict and role ambiguity. Analyses rule out the possibility that the results merely express adaptation of attitudes to imposed employment realities. It was also found that involuntary THEs prefer long assignments with a single client‐company whereas voluntary THEs prefer the variety associated with short‐term assignments. Few male (21.5 per cent of the sample) and female differences in outcome measures were found. Implications for client companies, for human resource agencies, and for individual employees are suggested.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 December 2019

Tinka van Vuuren, Jeroen P. de Jong and Peter G.W. Smulders

The purpose of this paper is to test the relationship between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance, and to assess how this association is different…

2889

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the relationship between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance, and to assess how this association is different across different employment groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a data set owned by TNO and Statistics Netherlands of more than 89,000 Dutch workers and self-employed that is a representative sample of the Dutch workforce. The authors included data from 2014 and 2016 assessing subjective job insecurity in terms of “a concern about the future of one’s job/business” and self-rated job performance.

Findings

The effect size of the association between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance is small. For temporary agency workers and on-call workers, the association between subjective job insecurity and job performance is weaker compared to permanent workers and fixed-term workers. However for self-employed workers with and without employees, however, the relation between subjective job insecurity and job performance is stronger compared to permanent workers.

Research limitations/implications

The biggest limitation is the cross-sectional design of the study, which limits conclusions about causality.

Practical implications

The finding that subjective job insecurity goes together with less work performance shows that job insecurity has no upside for the productivity of companies.

Originality/value

The study provides a deeper understanding of the relationship between subjective job insecurity and self-rated job performance on a national level.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

David Coghlan

Points out that a significant element of an individual′s life is throughgroups and that there are many different aspects of groups inorganizational life. Holds that the…

11730

Abstract

Points out that a significant element of an individual′s life is through groups and that there are many different aspects of groups in organizational life. Holds that the informal influence a group exerts on individual members through socialization, enforcement of norms and development of culture is powerful in how individuals respond to organizational change. Argues that teambuilding is critical to forming group responses to change issues, whether through the formal teams or through temporary task forces and committees.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Dana McDaniel Sumpter

The purpose of this paper is to explore processes of group member evaluation and the interpersonal behavioral consequences of perceived group membership, within the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore processes of group member evaluation and the interpersonal behavioral consequences of perceived group membership, within the context of a temporary group with evolving members.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data from an autoethnographic study, the author investigates individual socialization into a new group, with a focus on how gender influences interpersonal evaluation processes. The author analyzes the interpersonal organizing behaviors of surf lineups, which are a male-dominated group that is continually socially constructed through changing membership.

Findings

Findings support an association between denial of group membership and outcomes including incivility and denial of resources. The author develops a model of dynamic member evaluation, which identifies how group members continuously evaluate proximate individuals at the stage of impending membership, with identified outcomes of those evaluations.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this design is that it generalizes organizing processes from a non-traditional setting to more traditional organizations. The model predicts dynamic member evaluation as individuals organize into groups in a shifting environment, with implications for scholarship on intragroup dynamics, incivility, gender and inclusion.

Practical implications

Understanding dynamic member evaluation provides a path for aspiring or new group members to employ signaling behaviors, which can help to prevent incivility and enhance resource availability. Evidence suggests that the proactive act of signaling competence may help to foster inclusion at the stage of impending membership, which is particularly important given how impending member evaluation is subject to bias. Such understanding also raises the awareness of how majority group members can manage their evaluations and refrain from letting judgments of impending members impact interpersonal behaviors, which may prevent incivility.

Social implications

The findings and resultant model illustrate the process and experience of group inclusion, showing how incivility can manifest and resources can be limited toward impending members who are excluded.

Originality/value

This study contributes to scholarship by introducing dynamic member evaluation, including the content and process of evaluation at the stage of impending membership, how resultant selective incivility can be predicted, and potential contagion effects of such incivility.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Torstein Nesheim

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding of projects in permanent organizations. Previous research has captured organizational contexts where either a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding of projects in permanent organizations. Previous research has captured organizational contexts where either a project logic dominates or projects support recurrent, ongoing operations. Through a case study, the author shows how projects and non-projects coexist over time in the core of the organization in a balanced manner, addressing the specific tensions in such an organization.

Design/methodology/approach

The author has undertaken a case study of the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate. The analysis is based on several types of data: internal reports, descriptions of structure and roles, internal handbooks and other documents from the period 1998–2018; interviews with ten persons in different roles in the organization; and a survey of 190 employees and middle managers (response rate: 84 percent).

Findings

The author finds that the balance of projects and non-project work, work units and rationale has been an institutional and stabile characteristic, rather than a transitory state of a Norwegian state directorate. It is also found that two types of products or set of tasks are reflected in two types of work groups: long-term work groups and project work groups. There is a subjective element regarding whether a new task should be integrated into an existing long-term unit or serve as the basis of creating a new project. The analysis of work organization, leadership and employee perceptions has revealed a number of similarities and differences between the two work contexts: the long-term work groups and the projects. The balance of projects and non-projects is maintained through shared beliefs and the process of allocation of personnel. This balance is threatened through actual practice in the organization.

Research limitations/implications

A case study does not allow for statistical generalizations. The implication of the study is the revelation of a potential research gap “between” a project-based organization (PBO), on the one hand, and a project-supported organization (PSO), on the other hand.

Practical implications

For organizations that combine projects and non-projects in the core, the paper could contribute to the understanding of tensions and the way to handle them, and provide inspiration regarding mechanisms for resource allocation.

Originality/value

This paper identifies and empirically describes an organization where both projects and non-projects are of great importance in the core activities of the firm, thus filling a “gap” between the PBO and PSO. A number of aspects of this organization are analyzed, including how the balance of the two logics has been maintained over the two decades. The study could provide the basis for a number of research questions on the coexistence of and tensions between projects and non-projects in the core of an organization.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1971

John Morris

What is likely to happen to management development in the seventies? I believe that it will become closely linked with a newly evolving branch of management— development…

296

Abstract

What is likely to happen to management development in the seventies? I believe that it will become closely linked with a newly evolving branch of management— development management. Development management is concerned with building new forms of organisation that will enable the enterprise to cope effectively with change. This contrasts with operations management, which is concerned with the efficient use of existing resources to make the goods and services currently required, and with the rapid restoration of a steady state whenever a breakdown occurs. In some enterprises, it is possible to relate the two aspects of management very closely in day‐to‐day working. In others, the two need to be sharply separated if they are to be mutually effective. In either case, the co‐ordination of operations and development is a vital function of general management. With the growth of development management, general management will need more careful study, as its tasks will become more complex and demanding.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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