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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Paul Jennings and Catherine B. Matheson-Monnet

The purpose of this paper is to describe the design, implementation and evaluation of a small UK case study of a mentoring style pilot intervention integrating a specially trained…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the design, implementation and evaluation of a small UK case study of a mentoring style pilot intervention integrating a specially trained police officer alongside mental health professionals to support highly intensive service users of emergency services.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of the conceptual framework informing the mentoring intervention is described and its implementation evaluated using a range of qualitative and quantitative outcome measures.

Findings

The four high intensity service users involved in the pilot had internalised the need to participate in recommended recovery pathways. Mental health nurses reported improved compliance with treatment. Although the sample was small, the number of police mental health crisis detentions was reduced by 66 per cent after one year and by 100 per cent after 18 months. Usage of other emergency public services had also drastically reduced, or been eliminated altogether.

Research limitations/implications

Limited time and resources and the need for a solution that could be implemented as soon as possible meant a pragmatic design, implementation and evaluation.

Practical implications

The study indicated that a wider roll out of the new multi-agency mentoring model would be beneficial.

Originality/value

This is the first intervention to integrate mental health professionals and a trained police officer directly into the care pathway of repeated users of emergency public services with complex mental health needs.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Talal AlShammari, Paul Jennings and Brett Williams

Emergency medical services (EMS) educational standards in Saudi Arabia have developed at an unprecedented rate, and the rapid pace of development has resulted in a considerable…

Abstract

Purpose

Emergency medical services (EMS) educational standards in Saudi Arabia have developed at an unprecedented rate, and the rapid pace of development has resulted in a considerable disparity of educational approaches. Therefore, an empirically based core competency framework should be developed. The aim was to utilize exploratory factor analysis (EFA) in the reduction and generation of a theoretical Saudi competency model.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposive sample was utilized in a national quantitative cross-sectional study design of Saudi Red Crescent Authority (SRCA) healthcare workers. The instrument comprised 41 core competency items rated on a Likert scale. EFA alpha factoring with oblique promax rotation was applied to the 41 items.

Findings

A total of 450 EMS healthcare providers participated in the study, of whom 422 (93.8 per cent) were male and 28 (6.2 per cent) female. Of the participants, 230 (60 per cent) were aged 29–39 years and 244 (54.2 per cent) had 5–9 years of experience. An EFA of instrument items generated five factors: professionalism, preparedness, communication, clinical and personal with an eigenvalue > 1, representing 67.5 per cent of total variance. Only variables that had a loading value >0.40 were utilized in the factor solution.

Originality/value

The EFA model Saudi ParamEdic Competency Scale (SPECS) has been identified, with 27 core competency items and five overarching factors. The model has considerable similarities to other medical competency frameworks. However, some aspects are specifically unique to the Saudi EMS context. The SPECS model provides an academic blueprint that can be used by paramedic educational programs to ensure empirical alignment with the needs of the industry and community.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1951

WE look before and after at the beginning of 1951. The three cardinal dates in the history of the public library movement—which is only the larger part of the national library…

Abstract

WE look before and after at the beginning of 1951. The three cardinal dates in the history of the public library movement—which is only the larger part of the national library service—were 1850 which saw the legal origin of the movement; 1919 when it was set free from the enforced poverty of sixty‐nine years, and 1950 when it reached what until today was its veritable apotheosis. General recognition, such as authority from the Crown to the humblest journal gave to public libraries, was something undreamed of not more than thirty years ago. Perhaps, now that some of the splendour of the commemoration has taken more sober colours, it is well to consider what was gained by it. First, the recognition is there and can scarcely be belittled by anyone hereafter; we stand on a somewhat different platform now. We have the extremely valued recognition of our colleagues from libraries overseas. From these advantages all libraries and not only public libraries will in their own way profit.

Details

New Library World, vol. 53 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Abstract

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2002

William W. Jennings, Karen Schnatterly and Paul J. Seguin

We examine relations between institutional ownership and quoted bid-ask spreads in general, and the adverse-selection component of the spread in particular. For our sample of…

Abstract

We examine relations between institutional ownership and quoted bid-ask spreads in general, and the adverse-selection component of the spread in particular. For our sample of Nasdaq stocks, we find that high institutional ownership leads to narrower spreads and spreads with a smaller proportion attributable to asymmetric information. Our results are not attributable to institutions' preferences for liquid securities. The relation between spreads and institutional ownership varies significantly across institutional type and is related to the largest block size held by an institution. Our evidence suggests that increases in institutional ownership reduce the costs of liquidity services by ameliorating informational asymmetries.

Details

Innovations in Investments and Corporate Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-897-2

Book part
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Koray Caliskan and Michael Lounsbury

This paper contributes to a growing literature that examines entrepreneurship with a critical perspective, arguing for a research agenda that makes entrepreneurialism as discourse…

Abstract

This paper contributes to a growing literature that examines entrepreneurship with a critical perspective, arguing for a research agenda that makes entrepreneurialism as discourse visible. We define the discourse of entrepreneurialism as a style of thinking and economic intervention that invites actors to pursue their interests by drawing on a limited notion of agency that locates itself in an imaginary economic universe independent of institutions, broad social contexts, and identity considerations. Associated with the global rise of neoliberalism, entrepreneurialism provides actors with tools and competences to imagine organizations in narrow, instrumental terms and with an idealized notion of agency. We argue that seeing entrepreneurial capacity in such a limited way makes it impossible to fully understand entrepreneurship as a phenomenon. Highlighting the adverse consequences of entrepreneurialism, we map areas of inquiry that can contribute to the emergence of a more effective and comprehensive critical research agenda concerning entrepreneurialism.

Details

Entrepreneurialism and Society: New Theoretical Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-658-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2003

Frank Borgers

JoAnn Wypijewski, reflecting on the experience of workers laid off from General Electric’s (GE) Bloomington, Indiana refrigerator plant, as GE announced profits of $12.7 billion…

Abstract

JoAnn Wypijewski, reflecting on the experience of workers laid off from General Electric’s (GE) Bloomington, Indiana refrigerator plant, as GE announced profits of $12.7 billion, and the relocation of half the production to Celaya, Mexico, asks: What will it take to match fire with fire at GE, not just in Bloomington but everywhere? Twenty years ago, Jack Welch openly articulated a strategy for taking the company to where it is today. The GE unions never developed a parallel strategy, and 100,000 lost jobs later, most of them still haven’t shed their faith in what the AFL-CIO likes to call “high-road capitalism.” During the 2000 national contract talks, Robert Thayer, the Machinists’ representative to the CBC, was trying to convince the company to agree not to interfere in future unionization drives, arguing that a “contract is a partnership, not a hindrance.” To which the company coolly asserted, “GE has never been neutral and doesn’t intend to be neutral” (Wypijewski, 2001, p. 22).GE has become an icon of global capital mobility and union avoidance. However, GE’s current capacities can be traced back to a long term, explicit strategy of corporate reorganization initiated in the 1940s. At that time GE was a vertically integrated manufacturing conglomerate, based in a series of huge, northern U.S. plants, organized at extremely high density by the left and militant UE. In the sixty years since, GE has transformed itself into a networked and globalized conglomerate, whose manufacturing capacity has been relocated endlessly, first into smaller U.S. greenfield sites and then increasingly overseas, decimating U.S. union density, and replacing UE with a patchwork of AFL-CIO affiliates that have embraced a far more conservative and limited vision of unionism. U.S. labor has been unable to halt this transformation.

Details

Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-028-9

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1965

George Ottley

THE FUNCTION OF THE REFERENCE LIBRARIAN is to conduct requests for knowledge to known or to possible sources. He can sometimes do this by turning with arm‐length familiarity to a…

Abstract

THE FUNCTION OF THE REFERENCE LIBRARIAN is to conduct requests for knowledge to known or to possible sources. He can sometimes do this by turning with arm‐length familiarity to a bay full of familiar friends —B.N.B., Besterman, Walford, Britannica, Willings ‐ and an increasing number and variety of bibliographical aids to specialized fields in current literature, but a request for wide, intensive and retrospective book coverage of a subject can set him dancing for a whole afternoon.

Details

Library Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1979

Clive Bingley

A YEAR having now elapsed since I concluded the sale of Clive Bingley Ltd, and the contract of sale having contained, at my insistence, a provision that I would remain with the…

Abstract

A YEAR having now elapsed since I concluded the sale of Clive Bingley Ltd, and the contract of sale having contained, at my insistence, a provision that I would remain with the company for not less than six months (to ensure a satisfactory transfer to the new regime) and not more than twelve months (to prevent the new regime being lumbered with an old fuddy‐duddy), I have now resigned my employment with Clive Bingley Ltd, and with the associated companies set up last year to encompass its projected expansion, namely K G Saur Ltd and KGS Reference Services Ltd. In lieu of my former directorships, I have agreed to act as a consultant to these companies for as long as either of us thinks I can be of service to them, a status which recognises the role 1 have in practical terms been playing during the months since the companies abandoned Pembridge Road for plushier new offices in the West End of London.

Details

New Library World, vol. 80 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Teams are pervasive. According to a recent survey, 68 percent of Fortune 1,000 companies were using self‐managed work teams in one form or another in 1994. But not everyone sees…

Abstract

Teams are pervasive. According to a recent survey, 68 percent of Fortune 1,000 companies were using self‐managed work teams in one form or another in 1994. But not everyone sees teams as effective. Here are some common problems:

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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