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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Irma Mikkonen and Marja‐Anneli Hynynen

The aim of this study was to describe nurses' and other health care professionals' views about their patient education skills and how to develop them.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to describe nurses' and other health care professionals' views about their patient education skills and how to develop them.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the study were collected from the participants of the online education course on patient education. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The results show that, in the experience of health care professionals, it is important to make a shift from the professional‐led education and counselling towards an education relationship in which the professional and the patient are equals and represent different kinds of expertise and to develop patient education towards patient‐centredness supporting the patients' self‐management.

Research limitations/implications

The sample used in the research is small.

Practical implications

The participants in this study experienced that, as patient educators, it is necessary for them to acknowledge their own abilities, beliefs and values in order to be able to develop their patient education skills. This is noteworthy because appreciating and acknowledging the importance of reflection is one prerequisite for the paradigm shift from the traditional patient education model towards patient‐centred education. Consequently, it is important to investigate further the best ways of facilitating the development of health care professionals' skills with regard to patient‐centred education.

Originality/value

The study showed that, through education and training, health care professionals can recognize the need to develop their patient education towards patient‐centredness.

Details

Health Education, vol. 112 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Angela Towle, Christine Farrell, Martha E Gaines, William Godolphin, Gabrielle John, Cathy Kline, Beth Lown, Penny Morris, Jools Symons and Jill Thistlethwaite

The purpose of this paper is to present a statement about the involvement of patients in the education of health and social care professionals developed at an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a statement about the involvement of patients in the education of health and social care professionals developed at an international conference in November 2015. It aims to describe the current state and identify action items for the next five years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes how patient involvement in education has developed as a logical consequence of patient and public participation in health care and health research. It summarizes the current state of patient involvement across the continuum of education and training, including the benefits and barriers. It describes how the conference statement was developed and the outcome.

Findings

The conference statement identifies nine priorities for action in the areas of policy, recognition and support, innovation, research and evaluation, and dissemination and knowledge exchange.

Originality/value

The conference statement represents the first time that an international and multidisciplinary group has worked together to assemble in a single document specific priorities for action to embed the patient’s voice in health professional education.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Tue Helms Andersen, Nana Folmann Hempler and Ingrid Willaing

The purpose of this paper is to explore educators’ experiences of putting a participatory and patient-centered education model, “The Health Education Juggler,” into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore educators’ experiences of putting a participatory and patient-centered education model, “The Health Education Juggler,” into practice after having attended a one-day seminar. The model consists of four educator roles in participatory group-based patient education in chronic illness: embracer (takes care of the group), facilitator (generates dialogue and participation), translator (communicates professional knowledge) and initiator (motivates action in patients).

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative analysis of observations of eight group-based patient education sessions and seven in-depth semi-structured interviews with 11 educators.

Findings

Educators find it difficult to include disease-specific knowledge when working with a flexible patient-centered approach. They tend to stay in the role they find most comfortable during education sessions (most often that of embracer), rather than adopting new and more challenging roles in the teaching process. Educators theoretically understand the role of facilitator, but they do not know how to perform in this role in practice. The ability to juggle all educator roles depends on the ability to master each.

Practical implications

The Health Education Juggler model shows promise in promoting participation and patient-centeredness and as a reflection tool for educators and an analytic tool for quality assessment of patient education. These findings support further development of model use.

Originality/value

This model of educator roles in group-based patient education in chronic illness provides a new approach to patient education. It indicates the need for various professional competencies among educators to provide patient-centered education in a flexible way, with a strong focus on patient-identified problems and challenges, social learning processes and generation of internal motivation in patients.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Gitte Engelund, Ulla Møller Hansen and Ingrid Willaing

– The purpose of this paper is to explore educator competencies and roles needed to perform participatory patient education, and develop a comprehensive model describing this.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore educator competencies and roles needed to perform participatory patient education, and develop a comprehensive model describing this.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection in the qualitative study proceeded through two phases. In the first phase, 28 educators were involved in exploring educator competencies needed to perform participatory, group-based patient education. The paper used qualitative methods: dialogue workshops, interviews and observations. In the second phase, 310 educators were involved in saturating and validating the insights from phase one using workshop techniques such as brainstorming, reflection exercises and the story-dialogue method. A grounded theory approach was used to analyse data.

Findings

A model called “The Health Education Juggler” was developed comprising four educator roles necessary to perform participatory patient education: the Embracer, the Facilitator, the Translator and the Initiator. The validity of the model was confirmed in phase two by educators and showed fit, grab, relevance, workability and modifiability.

Practical implications

The model provides a tool that can be used to support the focus on “juggling” skills in educators: the switching between different educator roles when performing participatory, group-based patient education. The model is useful as an analytical tool for reflection and supervision, as well as for observation and evaluation of participatory, group-based patient education.

Originality/value

The study proposes a comprehensive model consisting of four equally important roles for educators performing participatory, group-based patient education.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Nicola Jane Spalding, Fiona Mary Poland, Sheila Gregory, Jane McCulloch, Kevin Sargen and Penny Vicary

– The purpose of this paper is to understand and develop ways to enhance patients’ experiences of preoperative education received prior to surgery for colorectal cancer.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand and develop ways to enhance patients’ experiences of preoperative education received prior to surgery for colorectal cancer.

Design/methodology/approach

Based in the UK, three-action research cycles were undertaken to evaluate preoperative education, identify changes seen by patients and staff as likely to improve the service and to re-evaluate such changes following implementation. Data in each cycle were collected from: observations of clinic interactions; patient questionnaires; individual semi-structured interviews with multidisciplinary colorectal unit staff; longitudinal semi-structured interviews with patients and carers pre-surgery, two weeks post-surgery and 12 weeks post-surgery; patient and carer focus groups post-surgery; and existing educational material.

Findings

In total, 138 participants shared their experiences of either giving or receiving preoperative education. Findings were themed into why patients want preoperative education, and patients’ views of the educational processes.

Practical implications

Patients emphasised the need for educational provision to be fully understandable, comprehensive and client-centred using a range of communication processes. Patients emphasised the need for educational provision to be more fully understandable, comprehensive and client-centred and that important messages should be reinforced using a range of media. At a time of many uncertainties for patients’ lives, such education needed to encompass the experiences patients could expect, delivered by confident healthcare professionals.

Originality/value

Contextualising understanding and facilitating their own actions, enabled patients to regain control in circumstances particularly disruptive of bodily and other life routines. Establishing a sense of control is confirmed as important for patient's wellbeing in preparing for surgery and postoperative rehabilitation.

Details

Health Education, vol. 113 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Rikke Torenholt, Gitte Engelund and Ingrid Willaing

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use and applicability of cultural probes – an explorative participatory method to gain insights into a person’s life and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the use and applicability of cultural probes – an explorative participatory method to gain insights into a person’s life and thoughts – to achieve person-centeredness and active involvement in self-management education for people with chronic illness.

Design/methodology/approach

An education toolkit inspired by the ideas of cultural probes was developed and feasibility tested in 49 education settings in Denmark. Questionnaires, interviews, and observations were used to collect data, which were analysed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and systematic text condensation.

Findings

Educators emphasized the applicability of the toolkit, and between 69 and 82 per cent of educators reported that the toolkit supported them in facilitating person-centred education and active involvement to a high or very high degree. Most educators (81 per cent) reported that they would like to apply the toolkit again in future education to a high or very high degree. Five categories of educator experiences were identified: interaction and activity; person-centeredness; group dynamics and synergy; openness; and light and cheerful atmosphere. Educators talked significantly less in situations where the toolkit was applied. This indicates the ability of the toolkit to facilitate talk among participants and thereby let participants become the focal point of education. Applying cultural probes in patient education targeting people with chronic illness seems to be a useful method to achieve patient-centeredness and active involvement in patient education and to support educators in facilitating this process.

Originality/value

Introducing fully flexible education toolkits inspired by cultural probes may, in the future, lead to improved self-management patient education among people with chronic illness.

Details

Health Education, vol. 115 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Yu‐Hsiu Kao, Yi‐Ching Huang, Pei‐Ying Chen and Kuo‐Ming Wang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the transtheoretical model (TTM) to design the exercise education programs. A total of 94 subjects diagnosed with CKD at a medical center in Taiwan participated in this quasi‐experimental study. Subjects were randomly divided into the experimental group (n=45) and the control group (n=49). The education program included written materials and teaching activities designed to encourage participants to initiate and continue regular exercise. Both groups took the pre‐test and post‐test containing a depression inventory, a fatigue scale and an exercise behavior inventory.

Findings

The findings indicated that changes in the exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of the experimental group were statistically significant after the exercise education intervention compared with the control group.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that exercise education intervention can be administered by nursing staff, or a health educator, to encourage patients to exercise in order to enhance their quality of care.

Details

Health Education, vol. 112 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Kelsey Leonard Grabeel

The University of Tennessee Medical Center in Knoxville (UTMC) Preston Medical Library (PML) and Health Information Center (HIC) has provided a novel contribution to…

Abstract

The University of Tennessee Medical Center in Knoxville (UTMC) Preston Medical Library (PML) and Health Information Center (HIC) has provided a novel contribution to increasing consumer health literacy and reducing health disparities in a unique variety of ways. UTMC librarians have used qualitative, quantitative, and practice-based methodology and research to demonstrate what a regional medical library working with internal and community partners can accomplish. At UTMC, there has been a focus on the value of health literacy for the patient, the clinician, and the health care system itself. In 1993, the UTMC PML began a consumer and patient health information service, which was the foundation for increasing consumer health literacy. In 2014, UTMC took a leading role in advancing consumer health literacy through the opening of the HIC, a patient- and family-focused library inside of UTMC. This chapter will focus on the PML’s history as a reliable resource in providing patients, family members, and the community with accurate and trustworthy health information, as well as the librarians’ role related to health literacy and health disparities through various initiatives and projects. Additionally, this chapter will highlight specific suggestions for libraries interested in starting similar initiatives, such as obtaining support from leadership, opportunities for funding, and how to address roadblocks.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Henry O’Lawrence and Michell Poyaoan-Linzaga

The purpose of this paper is to determine the association between patients who talked to their doctor about their risk of falling, or occurrence of balance problem. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the association between patients who talked to their doctor about their risk of falling, or occurrence of balance problem. This study analyzed a secondary data set based on the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) for the Medicare Advantage patients of 65 years and older. This study guided by two hypotheses that: patients who talked to their doctor about falling or balance problem are more likely to have fallen in the past than those who did not talk to their doctor about their fall risk; and patients talking to their doctor about a fall or balance problem are more likely to receive an early intervention such as patient education to prevent a future fall.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a secondary data set to test its hypotheses. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is dedicated to monitoring the quality of care provided to Medicare population in a managed care setting. Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research conducts the HOS to measure outcomes of quality improvement interventions developed by CMS in collaboration with the National Committee for Quality Assurance for Medicare Advantage Organizations (MAOs). The measures are focused on assessing the physical functioning and mental health being of Medicare beneficiaries and are aligned with reporting evidence of standards of care. Medicare HOS is administered in each Spring surveying a random sample of Medicare beneficiaries from MAOs that have a minimum of 500 enrollees; the cohort is surveyed again two years later as a follow-up measurement.

Findings

Reporting of a fall or balance problem is a critical component in fall prevention strategies. This study analyzed the distribution of beneficiaries who talked with their doctor about a fall or balance problem to understand if personal disposition (i.e. social class – educational level, gender, and race) would have been a factor in patients communicating with their doctor about their risk factors. The study found that 67.77 percent of patients who talked with their doctor about a fall or balance problem have at least a high school education compared with 32.23 percent who have less than a high school education or GED.

Research limitations/implications

All patients who responded to the survey and fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in the study. Therefore, the data presented a limitation due to a self-report of no doctor visits, which could indicate inopportunity for provider-patient communication to take place. Additionally, such an information on fall or balance problem, including actual fall occurrence in the past 12 months, was based on self-report that could present inaccuracy since the elderly population tend to have diminished or poor memory, which may also be problematic.

Practical implications

Although this specific interaction starts with patient reporting of a health problem such as a fall or balance problem, provider must take a proactive approach in deploying prevention strategies, such as to conduct a comprehensive fall-risk assessment regardless of a report of a fall history by the patient. Further investigation of this study is recommended to ascertain pre-dispositional factors that affect patient communication, in order to address any barriers that could impede patient-provider collaboration. Nonetheless, enhancing patient-provider communication is fundamental to any quality intervention strategies such as fall prevention.

Social implications

Another key finding in this study is that patient communication facilitates fall prevention. Patients who talked to their doctor about their fall or gait problem were provided with patient education on how to prevent falls by their doctor. The provider is informed on patient’s balance problem, which leads to further evaluation of patient health status in order to identify other related factors since a comprehensive fall-risk assessment would have been likely conducted providing adequate information beyond the fall occurrence. This affirms the need for provider-patient communication to serve as catapult for effective care coordination, which is effectual in any intervention strategies.

Originality/value

Fall prevention is increasingly drawing attention and gaining momentum among healthcare organizations (including non-managed care) since falls and fall-related injuries are easily preventable (Lach et al., 2011). Efforts that can identify and accurately analyze patient health status, including intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors, promote effective interaction between patient and provider. This study has shown the positive effect of patient communication in order to allow doctors to effectively intervene (i.e. prevent a future fall) through the provision of patient education.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Hasriani, Elly Lilianty Sjattar and Rosyidah Arafat

This review aims to describe the effectiveness of education with the transtheoretical model (TTM)-based on the self-care behavior of hypertension patients.

Abstract

Purpose

This review aims to describe the effectiveness of education with the transtheoretical model (TTM)-based on the self-care behavior of hypertension patients.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature search was carried out on four databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Cochrane and Grey literature to identify studies reported in English which were published in the last ten years. The literature search was conducted from November 13 to December 10, 2020.

Findings

Based on the six studies that have been analyzed, TTM is effective in changing the stage of change and behavior of hypertension patients. These behavioral changes have an impact on the patient's controlled blood pressure. Various types of TTM-based educational interventions can be used, but the tailored behavior intervention is the most appropriate one with a minimum intervention duration of six months. Educational intervention is carried out through combine counseling and education using electronic media.

Originality/value

This review presents the effectiveness of transtheoretical-based health education in changing the self-care behavior of hypertension patients accompanied by evidence-based on its implementation. There is a high and unclear risk of bias on several items influence this systematic outcome. Nevertheless, this review can still provide an overview of the effectiveness of education based on the TTM in hypertension patients about the quality results of the reviewed studies.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

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