Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

C.C. Wolhuter

This paper presents a state-of-the-field review of progress toward the ideal of Education for All in the Sub-Saharan Africa region. First, the significance of Education…

Abstract

This paper presents a state-of-the-field review of progress toward the ideal of Education for All in the Sub-Saharan Africa region. First, the significance of Education for All in Sub-Saharan Africa is clarified. Then, the beginnings of formal education in Sub-Saharan Africa (i.e., nineteenth century missionary education) are discussed, followed by colonial education. This is followed by an overview of post-independence strategies and initiatives aimed at the expansion of education. The Outline of a Plan for African Educational Development, drafted by a meeting of Ministers of Education of African states (MINEDAF) immediately after independence, 1961, is discussed, followed by the resolutions taken at the seven MINEDAF conferences held since 1961 till the present day. The resulting strategies and initiatives aimed at bringing education to all are discussed and evaluated. The impact of structural adjustment programs signed in recent years by most governments of African countries with the World Bank is also addressed. In conclusion, the present state of education in Sub-Saharan Africa and the prospects and challenges of Education for All are summarized.

Details

Education for All
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1441-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

A.H. Subratty, P. Beeharry and M. Chan Sun

Using a questionnaire, assesses the hygienic practices of a group of 50 street food vendors in Mauritius. The findings showed that generally, food vendors were quite aware…

Abstract

Using a questionnaire, assesses the hygienic practices of a group of 50 street food vendors in Mauritius. The findings showed that generally, food vendors were quite aware of hygienic conditions, which have to be respected while handling and preparing foods. However, it was found that the majority of them were not implementing their knowledge into practice and still perceived that their products were of relatively low risk to the consumers. It was also found that for more than half of the vending households, street food vending was the main income provider. Despite the role of health inspectors in promoting awareness of the risks which poor hygiene practices may lead to, findings from the present study highlight the need for further health education of food vendors.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gabriela Mazzon Valente, Lize Stangarlin-Fiori, Lais de Oliveira Seiscentos, Viviane Valle de Souza and Caroline Opolski Medeiros

This paper aims to evaluate the profile of food truck consumers at gourmet events, identifying their food preferences and opinions about the provision of safe food by this segment.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the profile of food truck consumers at gourmet events, identifying their food preferences and opinions about the provision of safe food by this segment.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 750 food truck customers in the city of Curitiba, Brazil, participated in the study. The survey investigated the socio-economic profile of the consumers, the frequency of their food consumption, the criteria for their choice of food trucks, their mean spending value, the method of payment used and the opinion of consumers about food cost and food truck hygiene conditions.

Findings

Most consumers were female (62.7 per cent), students (31.3 per cent) and with an average age of 29 ± 10 years. Many customers preferred the consumption of salty foods (84.0 per cent), mainly burgers and kabobs. The consumers reported spending between $6.32 and $9.03 during the events, and men spent more money than women (p = 0.000). Both thought that good conditions of hygiene (81.9 per cent), food presentation (46.9 per cent) and service (48.0 per cent) were more important than the product price (19.3 per cent). Consumers thought that the food trucks had an adequate structure (73.5 per cent) and the food handlers (74.4 per cent) had good conditions of hygiene, ensuring the safety of the food sold.

Research limitations/implications

On account of the convenience sampling in an urban environment, the data cannot be generalized to the entire population of the municipality and to other regions.

Originality/value

There are few studies with food trucks consumers in Brazil, to this writing the largest sample ever used for this type of research in this country. The results were designed to be used by professionals working in the area.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Abstract

Details

Education for All
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1441-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ala'a Hawari and Richard Heeks

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems are increasingly being adopted by organisations in developing countries. As in industrialised countries, this adoption seems…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems are increasingly being adopted by organisations in developing countries. As in industrialised countries, this adoption seems beset by significant rates of failure, leading to a large waste of investment and other resources. This paper seeks to understand why such ERP failure occurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper moves beyond factor lists to make use of an overall “design‐reality gap” model. The model is applied to a case study of ERP failure in a Jordanian manufacturing firm, analysing the situation both before and during ERP implementation through a mix of interviews, observation and document analysis.

Findings

The research finds sizeable gaps between the assumptions and requirements built into ERP system design, and the actual realities of the client organisation. It is these gaps – and the failure to close them during implementation – that underlie ERP project failure.

Research limitations/implications

This study shows the relevance and applicability of the design‐reality gap model to understanding ERP failure. Further research can be undertaken applying the model to other ERP cases, including case studies of success.

Practical implications

The paper draws conclusions about good practice in ERP implementation relating to both risk identification and risk mitigation, which must be based on closing design‐reality gaps. It offers examples of both specific and generic actions that help to achieve this. But it also notes limitations existing in some developing country contexts that may continue to constrain the effective use of enterprise resource planning systems.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new model for understanding ERP project success and failure, and for practical risk mitigation. The design‐reality gap model aims to be comprehensive but also contingent; sensitive to the specific conditions of any individual client organisation.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5