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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2004

Linda C. Ueltschy, Robert F. Krampf and Peter Yannopoulos

Perceived consumer risk is explored in relation to online (Internet) purchasing using a cross‐national sample (N=562) from the United States, Canada and U.K. Objectives of…

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1179

Abstract

Perceived consumer risk is explored in relation to online (Internet) purchasing using a cross‐national sample (N=562) from the United States, Canada and U.K. Objectives of the study are to determine if experience in online purchasing reduces perceived risk, if perceived risk varies across product/service categories and if certain types of risk are more important in purchasing certain products/services. Lastly, does national culture affect perceptions of risk? Results are discussed and suggestions are offered to managers on how to reduce perceived risk, thus increasing online purchasing in the three countries examined.

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Multinational Business Review, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Constanza Bianchi and Lynda Andrews

The purpose of this study is to investigate Chilean consumers’ online purchase behaviour with a specific focus on the influence of perceived risk and trust. Studies of…

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14126

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate Chilean consumers’ online purchase behaviour with a specific focus on the influence of perceived risk and trust. Studies of this nature have been conducted quite extensively in developed countries and in cross‐cultural comparative studies most noticeably comparing the USA with Asian countries. However, examining consumers’ perceived risk and trust with online purchasing in a Latin American context is very limited. While not a cross‐cultural study, this gap is addressed in the literature with an empirical study conducted in Chile. Moreover, it aims to address calls to investigate consumers’ post adoption acceptance of a technology to gain insights into which factors are most influential in explaining continuance behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper tests a model of the influence perceptions of risk and trust on consumers’ attitudes and intentions to continue purchasing on the internet. An online survey method is used. The sample consists of 176 Chilean consumers who purchase online. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The analysis reveals that perceived risk online had an inverse relationship with consumers’ attitude and that attitude has a positive influence on intentions to continue purchasing. Of the trust factors examined, trust in third party assurances and a cultural environment of trust have the strongest positive influence on intentions to continue purchasing online, whereas trust in online vendors and a propensity to trust were both insignificant.

Practical implications

In a Latin American context, for marketers in domestic and global companies these results identify which trust beliefs have the most effect on consumer continuance behaviour towards purchasing online. Additionally, this research shows that consumers in a Latin American country, recognized as a collectivist, high risk avoidance culture, are willing to continue making purchases online despite the risks involved.

Originality/value

The study and its results is one of few available that investigates consumers’ perceptions of risk and trust for online purchasing in a Latin American country. The value of the findings provides an insight into the specific trust factors that influence post adoption behaviour; that is Chilean consumers’ continued purchasing online. The findings add value not only to the literature on the Latin American population's e‐commerce behaviour, but also have managerial implications for domestic and global companies considering offering online retailing for consumers in this region where internet penetration rates are very high, but local e‐commerce availability is low.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Brooke E. Foucault and Dietram A. Scheufele

This study proposes and tests several social and perceptual motivations for shopping online. Using online textbook purchasing as a model, we outline predictors of online

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8172

Abstract

This study proposes and tests several social and perceptual motivations for shopping online. Using online textbook purchasing as a model, we outline predictors of online purchasing based on motivation theories drawn from traditional online consumer motivation research, social motivation theory, social influence theory and uses and gratifications theory. Our research adds a social and perceptual dimension to much of the typical online motivation research that deals with availability and cost issues. Data were collected using a pencil‐and‐paper survey of 156 students from a large Northeastern university. Findings of this study indicated that previous online purchase, positive social environment, professor support, knowledge of online retailers, and perception that needs will be met online are all predictors of online textbook purchasing. Implications for advertisers, online textbook retailers, and e‐commerce, more generally, are discussed.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Torben Hansen and Jan Møller Jensen

This paper seeks to investigate shopping orientation and online clothing purchases across four different gender‐related purchasing contexts. A conceptual model for…

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18967

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate shopping orientation and online clothing purchases across four different gender‐related purchasing contexts. A conceptual model for understanding the impact of shopping orientation on consumer online clothing purchase is proposed and tested both in a general setting and across purchasing contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed to 1,150 Danish household addresses by use of the “drop‐off‐call‐back” survey method. A total of 441 households returned usable responses from either one or both adults in the household. Most adults provided responses with respect to purchasing clothing for themselves and for their partner, making a total of 906 cases distributed across the four purchasing contexts. T‐tests and linear structural equation modelling were utilised to investigate expectations and hypotheses.

Findings

The results support the expected differences in men's and women's shopping orientations and willingness to purchase clothing online. On average, consumers indicate that reduced difficulty in selecting items is sorely needed when purchasing clothing online. However, when evaluated across different purchasing situations, perceived difficulty in selecting items is an important action barrier only for women. Less fun significantly affected online clothing purchases for men purchasing clothing for themselves, but not for women doing the same.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may seek to verify the proposed conceptual model using a range of specific clothing items across different purchasing situations. Future research may also expand the model by suggesting other influencing factors on consumers' online clothing purchasing.

Practical implications

In order to attract more men, online clothing retailers should improve perceived online fun, whereas difficulty in selecting items should be reduced in order to attract more women.

Originality/value

The study is unique in the sense that it investigates online clothing behaviour across four different gender‐related purchasing contexts.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Cristian Morosan and John T. Bowen

As scholarly research in online purchasing increases in size and scope, understanding the manner in which consumers engage during online purchasing in hotels is critical…

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1827

Abstract

Purpose

As scholarly research in online purchasing increases in size and scope, understanding the manner in which consumers engage during online purchasing in hotels is critical. The purpose of this study is to provide an analysis of the current online purchasing research pertaining to the hotel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis was conducted of 85 peer-reviewed articles published between 2006 and 2016 in hospitality and tourism journals to uncover the most critical aspects of online purchasing in hotels. Keyword searches and specific search parameters (e.g. literature time frame and locus of search) guided the review of the articles selected for the analysis.

Findings

This study recognizes that the discrete transaction per se represents the focal element in the hospitality scholarly research in online purchasing. It also recognizes the importance of the overall encompassing hospitality experience in creating and appropriating value for all stakeholders. Finally, the review found a strong orientation toward self-reported survey data as indicative of online transactions and the steps that precede them online.

Research limitations/implications

The study recognizes the present focus on discrete transactions and recommends expanding the focus to tap into more comprehensive purchasing processes that are mediated by technology.

Practical implications

The analysis presented here offers practitioners insight into the value chain member and consumer behaviors that could be feasibly converted into actionable managerial practices.

Originality/value

In contrast to the reviews discussing online purchasing, this study provides a unique broad analytical perspective on the relationships among buyers, sellers, products, retail interfaces and consumer decision processes that characterize the hotel online purchasing environment, as reflected in the past 10 years of hospitality and tourism literature.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Saleem ur Rahman, Muhammad Adnan Khan and Nadia Iqbal

The online purchasing behaviour of consumers has recently become a topic of increased interest and attention for marketers, policymakers, and researchers. However, due to…

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3375

Abstract

Purpose

The online purchasing behaviour of consumers has recently become a topic of increased interest and attention for marketers, policymakers, and researchers. However, due to its complex nature, this phenomenon is still in its infancy in many developing countries and needs to be paid more attention. Using the technology acceptance model (TAM), the purpose of this paper is to examine the role of utilitarian and hedonic shopping motivations, as well as the trust and privacy concerns of consumers in their online purchasing intentions, in a developing South Asian country: Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 859 respondents through a self-administrated questionnaire using the non-probability convenience sampling technique and were analysed using the structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results of this study demonstrate that, more than hedonic values, trust, and privacy concerns, utilitarian values positively influence consumers’ attitudes to online purchasing. Consequently, consumers’ attitudes positively influence their online purchasing intentions. The findings indicate that Pakistani consumers buy online for goal-oriented reasons. Not surprisingly, they feel unsafe buying online due to concerns over trust and data privacy.

Practical implications

The findings of this study have various practical and managerial implications for electronic businesses in developing countries. This study serves as a guide for the development of effective online marketing and selling strategies.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the existing literature on business to consumer e-commerce by identifying and empirically validating motivational factors and factors of concern using the TAM model. The extended TAM model, which integrates shopping motivations, trust, and privacy factors, can provide a solid theoretical foundation for consumers’ online purchasing behaviour in a developing country.

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South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Austin Rong-Da Liang

The purpose of this paper is to integrate food-related lifestyle (FRL) approaches and perspectives from the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to investigate the profiles of…

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4725

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate food-related lifestyle (FRL) approaches and perspectives from the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to investigate the profiles of consumers who purchase organic food online and to analyze differences in the related behaviors of consumers with different FRLs.

Design/methodology/approach

A link to a web site explaining the content and presenting an online questionnaire was provided through the e-newsletters of five well-known Taiwanese organic food distributors. Respondents were given NT$50 e-gift coupons after they had completed the questionnaire. A total of 950 questionnaires were distributed, and 753 valid samples were obtained.

Findings

Attitudes toward purchasing organic food online had the greatest positive influence on purchase intentions, followed by cognitive control and, finally, subjective norms. Populations with different FRLs were divided into traditional food, uninvolved food, and enthusiastic food shoppers, and these all showed significant differences with respect to the TPB model, their online organic food purchasing profiles, and demographic variables.

Originality/value

Organic food businesses draw on various features of the internet to solve issues such as the difficulty of storing and transporting perishable food items. However, few studies have combined theories of online consumer behavior with food characteristics and psychographic approaches to analyze the overall consumer profiles of purchasers of organic food. The author believes that the conclusions of this study may be used by the food industry to analyze consumer demand, draw inferences about organic food-related habits in consumers’ everyday lives, and design more appropriate internet marketing strategies.

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Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Lynda Andrews, Geoffrey Kiel, Judy Drennan, Maree V. Boyle and Jay Weerawardena

Purpose – This paper compares the experiential consumption values that motivate consumer choice to purchase online for both male and female purchasers and non‐purchasers…

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3942

Abstract

Purpose – This paper compares the experiential consumption values that motivate consumer choice to purchase online for both male and female purchasers and non‐purchasers. Design/methodology/approach – Using the theory of consumption value the study examines gendered perceptions of the functional, social and conditional value of using a virtual consumption setting for purchasing. Data was collected through an online survey and analysed using multiple discriminant analysis to determine meaningful differences between male and female purchasers and non‐purchasers. Findings – The findings show that male online purchasers are discriminated from female purchasers by social value and from male non‐purchasers by conditional value. Female purchasers are discriminated from male purchasers by functional value and from female non‐purchasers by social value. Female non‐purchasers are discriminated from female purchasers by conditional value. Male non‐purchasers are discriminated from male purchasers by functional and social value. Research limitations/implications – Limitations include using an Internet survey and an Australian sample which may impact the generalisability of the findings to a wider population of Internet users. Future research should involve replication of the study in a country more or less developed in terms of gender composition of internet users to extend the generalisability of the findings. Additionally, researchers should examine whether other dimensions of consumption value, such as social influence through on‐ and off‐line communication networks, may influence consumer choice to purchase online. Practical implications – The study provides practical implications for marketers to leverage consumption values that influence male and female consumers' choice to purchase online and then drive their behaviour online through integrated marketing campaigns that involve both on‐ and offline strategies. Originality/value – The research makes an original contribution to the consumer behaviour literature as to date, no research has been found that undertakes such a comprehensive gender‐based comparison of the perceived value of using a virtual consumption setting for purchasing.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Katija Vojvodic and Matea Matic

This chapter explores the relationship between impulsive online purchasing and the features of online consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the relationship between impulsive online purchasing and the features of online consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected through a survey questionnaire using the purposive sample of 240 Croatian consumers from the Dubrovnik-Neretva County. The data was analysed using factor analysis and one-way analysis of variance.

Findings

Research results indicate that Croatian online consumers are influenced by two major factors, impulsiveness and recreational factor. Based on the obtained results, profiles of Croatian online consumers can be identified.

Research limitations/implications

The sample contained Internet users from one Croatian county only, which possibly limits the generalisation of the findings. Future research should include Internet users from other Croatian counties, as well as their socio-economic characteristics.

Practical implications

The findings may be useful to online retailers, as well as marketers and practitioners to recognise and understand the determinants of online purchasing behaviour in order to convert casual online visitors to buyers and to encourage impulsivity in online buying behaviour.

Originality/value

The research provides new insights into impulsive purchasing behaviour of Croatian consumers in the online retailing environment.

Details

Challenges for the Trade of Central and Southeast Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-833-4

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Francesca Dall'Olmo Riley, Daniele Scarpi and Angelo Manaresi

This research aims to investigate consumers' likelihood of purchasing services online in two countries, the UK and Italy, which differ significantly in the population's…

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3592

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate consumers' likelihood of purchasing services online in two countries, the UK and Italy, which differ significantly in the population's uptake of internet shopping. Four influences are considered: service type, contact with service provider prior to online purchase, familiarity with service provider, and experience with internet purchasing.

Design/methodology/approach

For motor insurance and travel, respondents were asked to indicate the probability of purchasing on the internet the service of a provider they had used before, after a face‐to‐face contact with the provider, and also without prior contact with the service provider. Respondents were asked the same questions also for a provider they had not used before.

Findings

Differences in the relative uptake of internet shopping in the two countries did not alter the general results: a need for face‐to‐face contact with the service provider prior to online purchase and a preference for buying services from a familiar provider. Previous general experience of online shopping increases the likelihood of purchasing online.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should examine a broader range of service categories and should consider travel products of different complexity.

Practical implications

Online/offline integration of service provision is very important, as consumers highly appreciate some form of human contact, prior to online purchase, even in countries where consumers are more used to shopping from home.

Originality/value

The paper provides a better understanding of the influences on consumers' likelihood of purchasing services online. Findings are generalized in two countries, with different uptake of internet shopping.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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