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1 – 10 of 13
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2018

Björn Esken, María-Laura Franco-García and Olaf A.M. Fisscher

This paper aims to identify managerial implications for multinational corporations (MNCs) with regard to circular economy (CE) by using data on corporate social responsibility…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify managerial implications for multinational corporations (MNCs) with regard to circular economy (CE) by using data on corporate social responsibility (CSR) perception in different types of market economies owing to diverse institutional contexts. These managerial implications can contribute to the linking of CSR and CE strategies for MNCs.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an empirical study with a mixed-methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative research elements. The varieties of capitalism (VOC) approach with its two kinds of market economies – liberal market economy (LME) and coordinated market economy (CME) – builds the theoretical foundation.

Findings

All three guiding hypotheses of the quantitative research part are confirmed, which are: there is a differing perception of CSR in the two kinds of VOC; LME corporations adopt a shareholder value perspective; and CME corporations adopt a stakeholder values perspective. Furthermore, the qualitative research part has identified several key success factors for strategically conducting CSR in nexus with CE.

Practical implications

The mentioned key success factors become managerial implications for MNCs aiming at strategically conducting CSR. Due to several crossing points between (strategic) CSR and CE, those implications are largely also eligible for CE.

Originality/value

The paper helps to propel empirical findings into a more up-to-date discourse of debate. By emphasizing that the institutional background is likely to have an effect on how CSR is perceived in different kinds of market economies, the research offers a proposition how to use CSR perception as a signpost for CE and fuel future research into this direction.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Olaf A.M. Fisscher and Petra C. de Weerd‐Nederhof

Eccentric organisations are characterised by the capability to reflect on their own functioning within their industrial environment and societal context. Organisational…

1314

Abstract

Eccentric organisations are characterised by the capability to reflect on their own functioning within their industrial environment and societal context. Organisational responsibility, identity and intelligence are the three interrelated aspects of the concept of eccentricity applied to organisations. In order to achieve this, fitting social dynamical processes (reflection, communication and integration), systems and structures need to be introduced into the organisation. In this paper, a case study of new product development (NPD) is used to illustrate eccentricity in organisations. In NPD, where the goal is to develop a capability of innovativeness both in the short‐term‐oriented operational effectiveness of NPD prospects, as well as in the longer‐term‐oriented strategic flexibility of the NPD function, developing such an ability for reflecting‐in‐collective‐action is especially crucial.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Olaf A.M. Fisscher and Petra C. de Weerd‐Nederhof

Total quality management (TQM) for new product development (NPD) implies first, external quality (EQ): a focus on market demands and organizational embedding; second, internal…

1145

Abstract

Total quality management (TQM) for new product development (NPD) implies first, external quality (EQ): a focus on market demands and organizational embedding; second, internal quality (IQ): the efficiency of the primary NPD processes, and third, process quality (PQ): an orientation on development of NPD competencies. Good quality management in NPD concerning all three types of quality is only achieved when, in addition to the so‐called system‐technical approach, ample attention is paid to the social dynamics of NPD management. Social dynamics are a main element of dynamic NPD management, which further comprises configurational dynamics and the balancing of short‐ and long‐term NPD performance (again in terms of EQ, IQ and PQ). Three clusters of social‐dynamical aspects are worked out conceptually, operationalized and linked to performance: leadership, collective mind and narratives. Based on a multiple case study research, empirical findings will be presented concerning social‐dynamical aspects in practice. In our conclusions we will also reflect upon the usefulness of these concepts for further theory development in the area of dynamic NPD management related to TQM.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Olaf Fisscher and André Nijhof

This article is an attempt to clarify the links between quality management and business ethics in order to show what quality management can learn from insights out of the field of…

9005

Abstract

Purpose

This article is an attempt to clarify the links between quality management and business ethics in order to show what quality management can learn from insights out of the field of business ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on research in the field of business ethics, methods and processes are explored for implementing quality management within organisations.

Findings

An important result of this study is that only by combining personal care with control of processes is it possible to achieve the highest levels of quality. The implications of these findings are discussed along with future directions for research on quality management.

Practical implications

In total quality management systems, attention is paid to social responsibility as far as the impact on society is recognised and implemented within the company. However, this paper puts forward the necessity for relational responsibility based on personal care as a crucial factor in the relationships between supervisors and employees, between salespeople and customers, et cetera. Therefore, the incorporation of relational responsibility into quality programmes seems an important next step in the development of quality management.

Originality/value

Responsibility in the sense of authority distribution within organisations is a central topic for quality management. This paper contributes to a broader view on responsibility based on moral values, personal care and its impact on stakeholder relationships.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Muhammad Asif, Erik Joost de Bruijn, Alex Douglas and Olaf A.M. Fisscher

This paper seeks to elaborate the reasons why quality management programs (QMPs) frequently fail to produce the intended results, and to demonstrate how QMPs could be effectively…

6816

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to elaborate the reasons why quality management programs (QMPs) frequently fail to produce the intended results, and to demonstrate how QMPs could be effectively institutionalised in an organisational setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of literature from different management fields was carried out to determine how the main issues about QMPs' implementation are discussed in diverse areas (such as strategic and operations management) and how useful insights regarding better implementation and institutionalisation of QMPs could thus be induced.

Findings

To harness maximum benefits, QMPs need to be implemented as a meta‐methodology (or meta‐management) targeting the whole enterprise. The QMPs need to be effectively integrated with the business strategy, which steers the business processes towards its unique competitive advantage. An undesirable scenario would be employing QMPs as sub‐methodologies that take the form of tools and techniques (quick fixes) and thus remain as stand‐alone programs which fail to yield desired results. Institutionalisation of QMPs requires a context specific design that promotes greater buy‐in by employees; developing the routines and structures that act as memory of organisational knowledge, and nurturing a common and fostering culture (instead of various sub‐cultures). Managerial intent of QMP implementation, i.e. performance improvement or legitimisation in the eyes of stakeholders, also determines the success or failures of QMPs.

Practical implications

This paper should provide practitioners and academics with a better understanding of managerial actions and factors that lead QMPs to failures and how such problems could be tackled. This research also provides a better understanding of managerial actions about QMPs implementation that are actually counter‐productive.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to theory and practice by explaining the reasons for QMPs failures and thus how such failures could be prevented. The research has significant originality, as there is little research to date focusing on the QMPs problems explained through perspectives from strategic management and operations management literature.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Muhammad Asif, Olaf A.M. Fisscher, Erik Joost de Bruijn and Mark Pagell

This paper is an empirical study of the organisational approaches used for integration of management systems (MSs) and the comparative effectiveness of such approaches.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper is an empirical study of the organisational approaches used for integration of management systems (MSs) and the comparative effectiveness of such approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

Research employed four case studies. Results are derived from the analysis of triangulated evidence obtained from in‐depth interviews, observations, internal documents analysis, archives, and short questionnaires.

Findings

Results identified two archetypes of integration strategies termed “systems approach” and “techno‐centric approach”. Maximum benefits are achieved by using a systems approach to integration of MSs, while using the techno‐centric approach leads to benefits mainly at the operational level.

Research limitations/implications

This research is qualitative and, as such, does not investigate the integration of MSs across a large number of organisations. The research does not investigate the causality between strategies employed for integration and their outcomes.

Originality/value

There is little empirical research to date on the strategies employed for integration of MSs and their effectiveness. This research contributes to both literature and practice by demonstrating that a systems approach gives rise to greater integration throughout various organisational levels and greater benefits as compared to other approaches.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Muhammad Asif, Erik Joost de Bruijn, Olaf A.M. Fisscher and Cory Searcy

The realm of standardized management systems (MSs) has expanded greatly over the last two decades. This expansion has highlighted the need for structured approaches to facilitate…

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Abstract

Purpose

The realm of standardized management systems (MSs) has expanded greatly over the last two decades. This expansion has highlighted the need for structured approaches to facilitate the integration of these systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the integration of standardized MSs through a meta‐management approach.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive survey of literature was carried out. Based on the literature review, a comprehensive framework was developed to guide the integration of standardized MSs. The framework is based on the “direction‐consistency‐coherence‐feedback” cycle.

Findings

A critical review of existing models and methodologies for the integration of standardized MSs highlighted the need for a systems‐oriented approach to integration based on stakeholder needs. The review further highlighted that the integration of MSs must be carried out at the meta‐level of organisational control. This focuses integration efforts on a higher level of abstraction, logic, and inquiry than is typically the case in efforts focused at the intervention or modeling level.

Practical implications

The framework will be of interest to both researchers and practitioners in the integration of standardized MSs because it provides a systematic way for addressing various stakeholder requirements. It describes how organisations could handle integration at various organisational levels and how an infrastructure for continuous improvement could be established.

Originality/value

The paper makes several contributions. It presents a unique approach to integration that has not been addressed in previous publications. The paper elaborates how to carry out integration of standardized MSs and how to develop a business management system for the whole organisation.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Muhammad Asif, Erik J. de Bruijn, Olaf A.M. Fisscher, Cory Searcy and Harm‐Jan Steenhuis

The purpose of this paper is to provide a process‐based design of integrated management systems (IMS) implementation.

2606

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a process‐based design of integrated management systems (IMS) implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive survey of peer‐reviewed literature was conducted. Based on the literature review, a comprehensive methodology for the design and implementation of an IMS was developed.

Findings

A critical review of the strategies employed and of difficulties encountered in IMS implementation reveals the need for a context‐ and process‐based design of IMS. At the operational level core activities are first designed from the perspective of stakeholders' requirements and then treated with operational excellence tools to strip away waste. The transformed core processes are then integrated with mainstream individual management systems to form one composite and holistic management system. The institutionalisation of IMS needs to be addressed in its design (through process embedded design) as well as at the users' level (through education and training of employees).

Practical implications

The paper provides the process‐based strategy for IMS implementation and institutionalisation.

Originality/value

The paper should be useful for practitioners searching for a recipe to integrate management systems, for government regulatory agencies seeking to facilitate the integration of management systems, and for researchers as a future area of research.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management, Social Innovation and Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-130-5

Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

André Nijhof and Victor Paashuis

Giving guidance to organisations by exploring the role of employees in innovating for new sustainable business.

Abstract

Purpose

Giving guidance to organisations by exploring the role of employees in innovating for new sustainable business.

Design/Methodology/Approach

This chapter builds upon two methods. Based on a literature study, with a focus on the work of Jan Kees Looise on social innovation, the main principles for the role of employees in next level innovation cycles are explored. Second, these principles are illustrated and refined in a case example.

Findings

New sustainable business can be stimulated by a combination of principles that strengthen the purpose, autonomy and mastery of employees.

Research Limitations/Implications

The case is stemming from a high-tech sector. Future research should explore whether the principles can be applied to other sectors.

Practical Implications

Managers have a big influence on the innovative potential of an organisation. This influence can obstruct or stimulate next practice innovation platforms. The principles that are highlighted in this chapter give guidance to managers how they can create an enabling environment for innovation.

Social Implications

A main point in the innovation approach described in this chapter is based on giving freedom to employees. This triggers an external focus to really understand the developments in society and how an organisation can improve their added value by acting upon this.

Originality/Value

The combination of innovation, customer value and sustainability is a rather new area in both literature and management practice.

Details

Human Resource Management, Social Innovation and Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-130-5

Keywords

1 – 10 of 13