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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Lynn M Shore, Lois E Tetrick, M.Susan Taylor, Jaqueline A.-M Coyle Shapiro, Robert C Liden, Judi McLean Parks, Elizabeth Wolfe Morrison, Lyman W Porter, Sandra L Robinson, Mark V Roehling, Denise M Rousseau, René Schalk, Anne S Tsui and Linn Van Dyne

The employee-organization relationship (EOR) has increasingly become a focal point for researchers in organizational behavior, human resource management, and industrial…

Abstract

The employee-organization relationship (EOR) has increasingly become a focal point for researchers in organizational behavior, human resource management, and industrial relations. Literature on the EOR has developed at both the individual – (e.g. psychological contracts) and the group and organizational-levels of analysis (e.g. employment relationships). Both sets of literatures are reviewed, and we argue for the need to integrate these literatures as a means for improving understanding of the EOR. Mechanisms for integrating these literatures are suggested. A subsequent discussion of contextual effects on the EOR follows in which we suggest that researchers develop models that explicitly incorporate context. We then examine a number of theoretical lenses to explain various attributes of the EOR such as the dynamism and fairness of the exchange, and new ways of understanding the exchange including positive functional relationships and integrative negotiations. The article concludes with a discussion of future research needed on the EOR.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-103-3

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Hassan Dakel Abd Radhi

Under international human rights law, states can limit the exercise of most human rights if it is necessary to protect the rights of others or collective interests. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Under international human rights law, states can limit the exercise of most human rights if it is necessary to protect the rights of others or collective interests. The hazards of epidemics and diseases have raised many legal, economic and social issues in their link with global health security, which renew the discussion regarding the effects of the COVID-19 on some civil and commercial transactions and financial and tax obligations. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the effects of COVID-19 on contractual obligations.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, we are going to follow the method of the analytical and applied approach at the same time by analyzing the cases in which contractual obligations are affected by the circumstances of the COVID-19 and its legal implications, as well as to apply the theories related to this aspect to different cases.

Findings

The result of the study funded that the legal adaptation of the COVID-19 pandemic is limited to the theory of emergency circumstances and the theory of the force majeure, and the matter remains in the hands of the trial judge to attribute the incident imposed on him to one of the two cases according to the circumstances of the case.

Originality/value

The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on contractual obligations should be applied on each contract separately according to the extent of its impact on the contractors because the spread of the virus may have an impact on the obligations of one of the contractors, leading to exhaustion of the debtor, or it may lead to the impossibility of implementing the obligation.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Aashna Sharma and Gurparkash Singh

This paper aims to develop an integrated model to analyse the corporate social responsibility (CSR) perception of organizations in a regulated environment. The developed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop an integrated model to analyse the corporate social responsibility (CSR) perception of organizations in a regulated environment. The developed model is used as a basis to analyse practice and perception of CSR using the obligation-opportunity concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper critically reviews the seminal literature and identifies inherent shortcomings in CSR’s existing conceptualizations. The concepts of implicit and explicit CSR are used to build a case for the integrated obligation-opportunity conceptual model. To analyse the CSR perception of select Indian organizations, a set of propositions are developed. The propositions are evaluated using the interpretive qualitative approach to analyse interviews from 12 CSR heads across 10 organizations.

Findings

The paper develops an obligation-opportunity conceptual model as an analytical tool to visually map existing CSR models and analyse organizations’ CSR perceptions. The results of the analysis of interviews suggest: the organizations in India are contributing towards CSR to abide by the law that is as an obligation; organizations can contribute towards strategic CSR by incorporating economic, social and environmental responsibilities simultaneously with the help of the developed model; CSR environment in India is implicitly-explicit in nature.

Originality/value

The proposed obligation-opportunity model enables mapping different theories along the dimensions of obligation-opportunity conceptualizations. It can be a powerful tool for researchers and practitioners to understand, research and strategically implement CSR in the given institutional environment.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Raluca Stana and Hanne Westh Nicolajsen

In highly digitalised countries such as Denmark, statistics show that one out of four employees has experienced high levels of stress. However, despite ample research…

Abstract

In highly digitalised countries such as Denmark, statistics show that one out of four employees has experienced high levels of stress. However, despite ample research evidence on the presence of technostress, the knowledge on this phenomenon is not yet part of the material and guidelines from official authorities. Previous research on technostress provides quantitative psychological and neurophysiological perspectives on technostress, focussing on the individual, the technology or the technological environment. The authors see this as a limited approach, as it leaves out the social environment in which technostress arises. The authors aim to expose the sociological mechanisms that contribute to technostress by using the sociological lens of obligation. The authors ask: ‘What is the knowledge that the sociological lens of obligation can bring to the theoretical understanding of technostress?’ To answer our research question, the authors employ an embedded case study in Denmark by looking into the existing political material and interviews with 14 employees across 6 organisations. The authors find that stress in practice is mostly addressed from a response perspective, which points to the individual. This view is inherent in how the individuals take responsibility for the technostress they experience. Another critical finding from our data is that technostress is socially constructed. The authors contribute to theory by using a new-to-IS theory and a qualitative approach to technostress research, which allows us to uncover how the social construction of obligation impacts the individual employee. Our theoretical contributions point to a need for practice to move in the direction of seeing technostress as a societal, rather than solely individual, responsibility.

Details

Information Technology in Organisations and Societies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives from AI to Technostress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-812-3

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Natalia Kolyesnikova, Tim H. Dodd and Debra A. Laverie

Wine and accessories bought partly or fully out of a perceived need to repay services received at a winery are defined here as gratuity purchasing. The purpose of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

Wine and accessories bought partly or fully out of a perceived need to repay services received at a winery are defined here as gratuity purchasing. The purpose of the research is to identify factors that predict gratuity purchasing at wineries. Specifically, the study seeks to investigate the role of gratitude and obligation, along with other consumer characteristics, in purchasing.

Design/methodology/approach

Winery visitors were sampled from six Texas wineries. A total of 357 questionnaires were analyzed. Hierarchical multiple regression, correlation and factor analyses were employed.

Findings

Gratitude and obligation were found to be strong predictors of purchasing at wineries. Visitors who feel grateful to personnel and/or obliged to buy wine are likely to spend more money at wineries. Involvement and knowledge also appear to be related to purchasing.

Practical implications

Since gratitude and obligation appear to be strong predictors of buying decisions, winery managers need to find ways to enhance visitor feelings of appreciation. Although developing a sense of obligation may have an impact on sales, obligation may also create feelings of not wishing to return. It is important for managers to consider the extent to which they would like to have people feeling obligated or guilty about making a purchase.

Originality/value

The research offers new insights into an understudied area of consumer behavior – the role of reciprocity in purchasing behavior. An innovative feature of this study is the development of a new instrument to measure gratitude and obligation.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Jin Feng Uen, Shu-Yuan Chen, Hsien-Chun Chen and Chih-Tang Lin

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cross-level relationship between moral obligation violation, overall justice climate, and survivors’ commitment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cross-level relationship between moral obligation violation, overall justice climate, and survivors’ commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from 25 companies with 261 individual employees’ cases from three main industries in Taiwan (n=25/261).

Findings

Organizations which have moral obligation violation during layoff would directly influence survivors’ perceptions of justice and further affect survivors’ level of affective commitment.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to provide evidence of the relationship between moral obligation violation, overall justice climate and survivors’ affective commitment. Additionally, most studies of survivors’ attitude and behavior are based on the third-party perspective; this study is the first to argue that survivors are also affected by employers’ layoff as well as victims. The influence of layoff will lead to survivors’ subsequent attitude and behavior.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Zhiyong Han, Qun Wang and Xiang Yan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating effect of felt obligation for constructive change on the relationship between responsible leadership and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating effect of felt obligation for constructive change on the relationship between responsible leadership and organizational citizenship behavior for the environment (OCBE) in a China corporate environment, and this paper also analyze the moderated mediating effect of supervisor-subordinate guanxi on indirect relationship between responsible leadership and OCBE via felt obligation for constructive change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used 380 employee samples to analyze the relationship between responsible leadership and OCBE. Hierarchical regression analyses and structural equation modeling was adopted to analyze the data.

Findings

The authors found that the felt obligation for constructive change plays a fully mediating role between responsible leadership and OCBE. The authors also found a positive interaction between responsible leadership and supervisor-subordinate guanxi on felt obligation for constructive change, and then the indirect effect of responsible leadership on OCBE via felt obligation for constructive change was stronger when employees perceived a high-level supervisor-subordinate guanxi.

Research limitations/implications

When responsible leadership stimulates employees to generate a high sense of constructive change, employees are more likely to engage in OCBE. This study provides evidence for cognitive evaluation theory. This study further demonstrated the importance of establishing high-quality supervisor-subordinate guanxi for responsible leaders and subordinates in China.

Practical implications

In the management practice of the organization, the role of responsible leadership should be strengthened in terms of leadership development and, employee training and promotion, and high-quality supervisor-subordinate guanxi help to promote the effectiveness of responsible leadership.

Originality/value

This paper discusses how and when responsible leadership influences OCBE in a China corporate environment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Natalia Kolyesnikova, Tim H. Dodd and James B. Wilcox

The purpose of this paper is to show how purchasing behavior is approached as a customer‐perceived need to reciprocate for services received. The study seeks to examine…

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9110

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how purchasing behavior is approached as a customer‐perceived need to reciprocate for services received. The study seeks to examine involvement, knowledge, and identity as predictors of reciprocal consumer behavior. Two components of reciprocity – gratitude and obligation – are expected to mediate the relationships. The effect is expected to be different for men and women.

Design/methodology/approach

Wine was chosen as a product category to test the relationships in the models. Data collection was conducted via distribution of surveys to tasting room visitors at six wineries. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The impact of knowledge, identity, and involvement were important findings from the research. The differences between males and females with regard to their feelings of gratitude and obligation and the impact on purchasing are pronounced. Obligation to make a purchase had a stronger effect on the purchasing behavior of women. In contrast, gratitude (feeling appreciation and thankfulness to personnel) was a stronger reason for men to make a purchase.

Practical implications

Knowledge about different ways in which men and women reciprocate could be useful for researchers and practitioners. Free samples provided to potential buyers, tours of industrial factories where products are also sold, and a variety of service situations are all possible contexts where gratitude and obligation may occur. Purchases are likely to be the result at least in part because of these feelings.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this research is to highlight the role of gender in reciprocity research and to demonstrate the application of this effect in consumer behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Sharad Asthana and Birendra Mishra

This study investigates the incremental value‐relevance of non‐pension postretirement benefit obligations and expenses (disclosed by firms pursuant to SFAS 106). Our study…

Abstract

This study investigates the incremental value‐relevance of non‐pension postretirement benefit obligations and expenses (disclosed by firms pursuant to SFAS 106). Our study is motivated by previously published evidences that investors value the SFAS 106 measure of postretirement benefit obligations. However, prior research does not address incremental value‐relevance of the SFAS 106. We address two related questions. First, “do the SFAS 106 measures of non‐pension postretirement benefit obligations and expenses provide incremental value relevance (after controlling for information available from non‐SFAS 106 sources).” Second, “under what circumstances are the SFAS‐106 measures more likely to provide incremental value relevance.” The key findings of this paper are: (i) on average, SFAS 106 measures of postretirement benefit obligations and expenses have no significant incremental value‐relevance after controlling for non‐SFAS 106 information; and (ii) labor intensity and the magnitude of postretirement benefit obligation increases the incremental value‐relevance of SFAS 106 measures.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

C.S. Agnes Cheng, Su‐Jane Hsieh and Yewmun Yip

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the choice of accounting treatment of transition obligation under SFAS 106 affects the value of firms, and also whether the…

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1344

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the choice of accounting treatment of transition obligation under SFAS 106 affects the value of firms, and also whether the quality of earnings is improved after the implementation of SFAS 106.

Design/methodology/approach

Different regression models were employed on a sample of 50 immediate recognition firms and 50 matched prospective recognition firms. Chow test is also used to investigate the quality of earnings before and after the implementation of SFAS 106.

Findings

In spite of the significant difference in impact on earnings from the choice of treatment of transition obligation, the accounting choice has no significant impact on the total value relevance of earnings and book value. When immediate recognition method is applied, investors ignore the one‐time charge of transition obligation, and rely more on book value in the valuation of a firm. However, when prospective recognition method is applied, both earnings and book value are value‐relevant in the adoption year and also in the subsequent year. In addition, the paper finds that the implementation of SFAS 106 improves the value relevance of earnings.

Research limitations/implications

Results are limited by the accuracy of the models used to measure value relevance of earnings and book value of equity.

Practical implications

Results may have implications for managers' choice of accounting treatment, and the evidence seems to support accrual basis over cash basis on earnings measurement.

Originality/value

The paper uses the value relevance approach to analyze the impact of SFAS 106 on the quality of earnings and book value of equity.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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