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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Nira Danziger, Dalia Rachman‐Moore and Rony Valency

The purpose of this paper is to test the construct validity of the measurement model of Schein's Career Orientation Inventory, where entrepreneurship and creativity constitute two…

6066

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the construct validity of the measurement model of Schein's Career Orientation Inventory, where entrepreneurship and creativity constitute two separate constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

A fairly representative sample of 1,847 Israeli working adults completed Schein's Career Anchor Inventory (COI) questionnaire, which probes career anchor constructs through associated indicator items. The data were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis to compare the fit of the proposed nine‐construct model with that of Schein's eight‐construct model.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that: the proposed nine‐construct model of the COI, which distinguishes between Entrepreneurship and Creativity and designates each as a separate construct, yields a better fit than Schein's eight‐construct model; and the nine‐construct model has convergent and discriminant validity and unidimensionality.

Originality/value

The study's contributions are threefold: first, it generally supports Schein's Career Anchor Theory, yet with nine anchors rather than with the original eight; second, it confirms the distinction between entrepreneurship and creativity; and third, it highlights the need to rephrase several existing items, and add new ones. The suggested changes and the conceptual framework of the nine‐anchor model will make the COI a more valid and reliable instrument, both for theory‐building and for practical and diagnostic use by career counselors.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Nira Danziger and Rony Valency

The purpose of this paper is to examine the career anchor concept developed by Edgar Schein.

3764

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the career anchor concept developed by Edgar Schein.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on the distribution of the eight career anchors, on a large heterogeneous sample and the differences in the distribution by gender and type of employment; and the impact of the congruence on job satisfaction between a person's career anchor and his job setting. The sample consists of 1,847 Israeli men and women who completed Schein's Career Anchor Inventory questionnaire. They also provided biographical data and indicated their level of job satisfaction. A new measure is developed and validated to assess the congruence between a person's career anchor and his job.

Findings

The most prevalent career anchor in the sample is lifestyle with the technical/functional anchor, second. Major differences were found between the self‐employed and salaried workers in four anchors. Significant differences between men and women are found in all but two career anchors: technical/functional and security. Finally, the study supports the hypothesis that congruence between a person's job and his career anchor has a positive impact on his job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The study furthers existing research on career anchors by using a large heterogeneous sample and offering a new measure of “congruence” between a person's job and his career anchor.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Nira Danziger and Yoram Eden

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether gendered differences in occupational aspirations still appear when considering students with similar abilities who study…

2908

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether gendered differences in occupational aspirations still appear when considering students with similar abilities who study competitively in the same achievement‐oriented educational setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses stipulated an interaction between gender and year of study on students' career aspirations and on career‐style preferences. An interactive expression was constructed, multiplying gender by year of study (i.e. a female student in her freshman year, a female student in her senior year, and so on). A sequence of logistic regressions was used to test the hypotheses. The hypotheses were tested by cross‐sectional analysis of the data, using 802 valid questionnaires collected from a sample of 1,000 Israeli accounting students from the accounting programs at three institutions of higher learning.

Findings

It was hypothesized that differences between the sexes in occupational aspirations and career style preferences would evolve and increase with years of study and especially as students approached the end of the academic track. In other words, it was expected that an interaction between gender and year of study would affect students' occupational aspirations and career‐style preferences. The findings supported the hypothesis. In their freshmen year, the sexes shared a similar pattern of aspirations and goals. However, during their later academic years, females reduced their occupational aspirations and revealed a stronger preference for a convenient balance between work and other facets of life. Logistic regressions demonstrated the statistically significant effect of the interaction between gender and academic year on student occupational aspirations and career‐style preferences.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates the decrease in female students’ occupational aspirations during the educational period, and that encouraging young women to obtain male‐type professional education might be insufficient in order to eliminate inequality between the sexes.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Yehuda Baruch

470

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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