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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Timothy W. Cole, Myung-Ja K. Han, Maria Janina Sarol, Monika Biel and David Maus

Early Modern emblem books are primary sources for scholars studying the European Renaissance. Linked Open Data (LOD) is an approach for organizing and modeling information…

Abstract

Purpose

Early Modern emblem books are primary sources for scholars studying the European Renaissance. Linked Open Data (LOD) is an approach for organizing and modeling information in a data-centric manner compatible with the emerging Semantic Web. The purpose of this paper is to examine ways in which LOD methods can be applied to facilitate emblem resource discovery, better reveal the structure and connectedness of digitized emblem resources, and enhance scholar interactions with digitized emblem resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This research encompasses an analysis of the existing XML-based Spine (emblem-specific) metadata schema; the design of a new, domain-specific, Resource Description Framework compatible ontology; the mapping and transformation of metadata from Spine to both the new ontology and (separately) to the pre-existing Schema.org ontology; and the (experimental) modification of the Emblematica Online portal as a proof of concept to illustrate enhancements supported by LOD.

Findings

LOD is viable as an approach for facilitating discovery and enhancing the value to scholars of digitized emblem books; however, metadata must first be enriched with additional uniform resource identifiers and the workflow upgrades required to normalize and transform existing emblem metadata are substantial and still to be fully worked out.

Practical implications

The research described demonstrates the feasibility of transforming existing, special collections metadata to LOD. Although considerable work and further study will be required, preliminary findings suggest potential benefits of LOD for both users and libraries.

Originality/value

This research is unique in the context of emblem studies and adds to the emerging body of work examining the application of LOD best practices to library special collections.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2019

Beatrice Annaheim, Tenzin Wangmo, Wiebke Bretschneider, Violet Handtke, Bernice S. Elger, Angelo Belardi, Andrea H. Meyer, Raphael Hösli and Monika Lutters

The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of polypharmacy and drug–drug interactions (DDIs) in older and younger prisoners, and compared if age group is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the prevalence of polypharmacy and drug–drug interactions (DDIs) in older and younger prisoners, and compared if age group is associated with risks of polypharmacy and DDIs.

Design/methodology/approach

For 380 prisoners from Switzerland (190 were 49 years and younger; 190 were 50 years and older), data concerning their medication use were gathered. MediQ identified if interactions of two or more substances could lead to potentially adverse DDI. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and generalised linear mixed models.

Findings

On average, older prisoners took 3.8 medications, while younger prisoners took 2.1 medications. Number of medications taken on one reference day was higher by a factor of 2.4 for older prisoners when compared to younger prisoners (p = 0.002). The odds of polypharmacy was significantly higher for older than for younger prisoners (>=5 medications: odds ratio = 5.52, p = 0.035). Age group analysis indicated that for potentially adverse DDI there was no significant difference (odds ratio = 0.94; p = 0.879). However, when controlling for the number of medication, the risk of adverse DDI was higher in younger than older prisoners, but the result was not significant.

Originality/value

Older prisoners are at a higher risk of polypharmacy but their risk for potentially adverse DDI is not significantly different from that of younger prisoners. Special clinical attention must be given to older prisoners who are at risk for polypharmacy. Careful medication management is also important for younger prisoners who are at risk of very complex drug therapies.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Monika Sheoran and Divesh Kumar

The earth is under massive stress due to current level of consumption which has crossed the sustaining capacity of our planet. Thus, the need of the hour is to promote…

Abstract

Purpose

The earth is under massive stress due to current level of consumption which has crossed the sustaining capacity of our planet. Thus, the need of the hour is to promote sustainable production and consumption. The purpose of this study is to identify the basic barriers of sustainable consumer behaviour which are hindering the adoption of sustainable consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is divided into two parts. The first part consists of a literature review based on 128 articles (1995 to 2020), which are spread over a period of 25 years. Based on the literature review, nine barriers of sustainable consumer behaviour were identified and put into three categories. In the second part, fuzzy analytical hierarchy process has been used to know about the relative weight of each barrier so that benchmarking/prioritising of basic barriers of sustainable consumer behaviour can be done.

Findings

This article identifies critical barriers affecting the acceptance of sustainable electronic products. High price, a perception of no environmental impact, no benefit in personal image, lesser use by family and friends, lack of awareness about the products etc. emerged as the potential barriers which need prime attention. The relative weight of each of these barriers has also been arrived at in this article which is expected to be beneficial for policymakers to focus upon important barriers. Impact of many of these barriers can be reduced through innovative approaches and solutions.

Research limitations/implications

This article will be helpful in future research in the field of sustainable consumer behaviour. Through the understanding of the barriers of sustainable consumer behaviour, companies, governments and industries can take suitable initiatives by modifying the policies and practices to reduce the impact of these barriers so that consumer behaviour can be made more sustainable.

Originality/value

The current article tries to identify the critical barriers to adoption of sustainable electronic products by the consumers. An extensive literature review, expert suggestions and consumer survey have been adopted to identify nine barriers. Although, multiple researches have been done in the field of sustainable consumer behaviour and adoption of sustainable electronic products, there is no research article which solely focuses on implementing Fuzzy analytical hierarchical process (AHP) approach to rank the barriers faced by consumers for adoption of sustainable electronic products. It has been concluded that high price of sustainable electronic products is the most critical barrier in adoption of sustainable consumer behaviour. Moreover, the relative ranking obtained with the help of Fuzzy AHP can be used by policymakers and organisations to promote and implement sustainability in consumer behaviour.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2021

Monika Sheoran and Divesh Kumar

This article attempts to explore the theoretical model and structural dimensions of sustainable consumer behaviour to develop a “sustainable consumer behaviour scale” for…

Abstract

Purpose

This article attempts to explore the theoretical model and structural dimensions of sustainable consumer behaviour to develop a “sustainable consumer behaviour scale” for sustainable electronic products. Further, this study has tried to elaborate sustainable consumer behaviour by considering the complete consumption cycle which includes purchase, usage and disposal of the sustainable electronic products.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) has been employed to understand the multidimensional nature of sustainable consumer behaviour with the help of qualitative and quantitative methods. With the help of a pilot study followed by a main study, a sustainable consumer behaviour scale for sustainable electronic products has been tested and validated for its factor study, reliability, validity and model fit, etc. Moreover, the influence of demographic variables has also been examined with the help of multi-group analysis.

Findings

This study highlights that the perceived control behaviour and subjective norms are the major factors that influence sustainable consumer behaviour. Moreover, the results also indicate that female consumers, mid income consumers, young consumers (age below 30) and consumers who have studied up to senior secondary level are more sustainable.

Research limitations/implications

The results can be used by policymakers and managers to identify and target particular subjective norms and factors impacting perceived control behaviour along with a specific set of demographics to increase sustainability amongst consumers and businesses. The results of the current study can help in increasing the focus of the academic research towards sustainable consumer behaviour. It will also encourage firms to include sustainable electronic products in their product line.

Originality/value

To the best of authors' knowledge, the current article is the first empirical study to develop a sustainable consumer behaviour scale by including all the different stages of the consumption cycle using TPB for sustainable electronic products. Although multiple efforts have been made by researchers to analyse sustainable consumer behaviour, there is a scarcity in literature in which research has been done to analyse sustainable consumer behaviour by considering the whole consumption cycle (purchase, usage and disposal).

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Monika J.A. Schröder and Morven G. McEachern

Aims to investigate the effect of communicating corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives to young consumers in the UK on their fast‐food purchasing with reference…

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Abstract

Purpose

Aims to investigate the effect of communicating corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives to young consumers in the UK on their fast‐food purchasing with reference to McDonald's and Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were conducted to clarify themes and inform a questionnaire on fast‐food purchasing behaviours and motives. Attitude statements were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis.

Findings

Most respondents (82 per cent) regularly purchased fast food from one of the companies; purchases were mostly impulsive (57 per cent) or routine (26 per cent), suggesting relatively low‐level involvement in each case. While there was scepticism regarding the CSR activity being promoted, expectations about socially responsible behaviour by the companies were nevertheless high. Four factors were isolated, together explaining 52 per cent of the variance in fast‐food purchasing behaviour. They were brand value, nutritional value, ethical value and food quality.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted with students, and while these represent a key‐target market, any further research should target a more diverse public.

Practical implications

There are important implications for global fast‐food companies in terms of protecting and developing their brand value; they need to respond to the wider food‐related debates in society, in particular, those concerning healthy eating and food ethics. They also need to ensure that their business practices are fully consistent with the values expressed in their CSR initiatives.

Originality/value

The special value of the paper lies in its joining together of current perspectives on CSR and consumer value in the UK food industry as it explores both through the perceptions of young consumers of fast food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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