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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Timothy W. Cole, Myung-Ja K. Han, Maria Janina Sarol, Monika Biel and David Maus

Early Modern emblem books are primary sources for scholars studying the European Renaissance. Linked Open Data (LOD) is an approach for organizing and modeling information…

Abstract

Purpose

Early Modern emblem books are primary sources for scholars studying the European Renaissance. Linked Open Data (LOD) is an approach for organizing and modeling information in a data-centric manner compatible with the emerging Semantic Web. The purpose of this paper is to examine ways in which LOD methods can be applied to facilitate emblem resource discovery, better reveal the structure and connectedness of digitized emblem resources, and enhance scholar interactions with digitized emblem resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This research encompasses an analysis of the existing XML-based Spine (emblem-specific) metadata schema; the design of a new, domain-specific, Resource Description Framework compatible ontology; the mapping and transformation of metadata from Spine to both the new ontology and (separately) to the pre-existing Schema.org ontology; and the (experimental) modification of the Emblematica Online portal as a proof of concept to illustrate enhancements supported by LOD.

Findings

LOD is viable as an approach for facilitating discovery and enhancing the value to scholars of digitized emblem books; however, metadata must first be enriched with additional uniform resource identifiers and the workflow upgrades required to normalize and transform existing emblem metadata are substantial and still to be fully worked out.

Practical implications

The research described demonstrates the feasibility of transforming existing, special collections metadata to LOD. Although considerable work and further study will be required, preliminary findings suggest potential benefits of LOD for both users and libraries.

Originality/value

This research is unique in the context of emblem studies and adds to the emerging body of work examining the application of LOD best practices to library special collections.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2017

Achim Oberg, Gili S. Drori and Giuseppe Delmestri

Seeking an answer to the question “how does organizational identity change?” we analyze the visual identity marker of universities, namely logos, as time-related artifacts…

Abstract

Seeking an answer to the question “how does organizational identity change?” we analyze the visual identity marker of universities, namely logos, as time-related artifacts embodying visual scripts. Engaging with the Stinchcombe hypothesis, we identify five processes to the creation of visual identities of organizations: In addition to (1) imprinting (enactment of the contemporary script) and (2) imprinting-cum-inertia (persistent enactment of epochal scripts), we also identify (3) renewal (enactment of an up-to-date epochal script), (4) historization (enactment of a recovered older epochal script), and (5) multiplicity (simultaneous enactment of multiple epochal scripts). We argue that these processes work together to produce contemporary heterogeneity of visualized identity narratives of universities. We illustrate this, first, with a survey of the current-day logos of 814 university emblems in 20 countries from across the world. Second, drawing on archival and interview materials, we analyze the histories of exemplar university logos to illustrate the various time-related processes. Therefore, by interjecting history – as both time and process – into the analysis of the visualization of organizational identity, we both join with the phenomenological and semiotic analysis of visual material as well as demonstrate that history is not merely a fixed factor echoing imprinting and inertia but rather also includes several forms of engagement with temporality that are less deterministic. Overall, we argue that enactment engages with perceptions of time (imaginations of the past, present, and future) and with perceptions fixed by time (epochal imprinting and inertia) to produce heterogeneity in the visualization of organizational identity.

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Multimodality, Meaning, and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-332-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Margaret H. Rucker, Elizabeth M. Crown and Carrie L. Haise

The objective of this study is to determine the effects of silk screened emblems on thermal protective performance of wildland fire fighter protective clothing systems…

Abstract

The objective of this study is to determine the effects of silk screened emblems on thermal protective performance of wildland fire fighter protective clothing systems under two moisture conditions. Three outerwear conditions (current emblem, new emblem, blank) were combined with both underwear conditions (emblem, blank) to produce six clothing systems. The two moisture conditions were both layers conditioned (dry) and top layer conditioned/lower layer saturated with water (wet). Both radiant protective performance (RPP) testing and thermal mannequin testing were used to evaluate the clothing systems. The data showed a decline in thermal protective properties of the clothing systems under conditions of high heat flux and wet inner layer. While both jacket emblems performed better than the blank jacket, one emblem was more protective under radiant exposure conditions while the other was found to be superior in the thermal mannequin tests.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Ann M. Torres

The purpose of this paper is to examine the branding and communications strategy of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). The ICRC is the world's oldest…

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1441

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the branding and communications strategy of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). The ICRC is the world's oldest non‐religious organisation dedicated to humanitarian relief. The ICRC's remit includes civilian and military victims of armed conflicts and internal disturbances, as well as human rights issues that transcend conflict situations, such as disaster response and preparedness, health and care in the community and humanitarian principles and values. The ICRC is the founding body of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and coordinates the efforts of the National Societies and their International Federation.

Design/methodology/approach

Various secondary sources are used to collate the information from which the case study is developed.

Findings

The ICRC's longevity is attributed to its ability to evolve, albeit at times slowly. However, the environment in which the ICRC operates is changing rapidly. Like many international non‐profit organisations, the ICRC faces considerable challenges to ensure it remains relevant by responding to the shifting environment in a flexible and creative manner. Consequently, the ICRC's communication efforts have become increasingly important.

Originality/value

The case study provides the opportunity to examine the branding and communications strategy for a prominent non‐profit organisation.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Jason E. Taylor and Peter G. Klein

This paper explores the nature and causes of the cartel compliance crisis that befell the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA) one year after its passage in 1933. We…

Abstract

This paper explores the nature and causes of the cartel compliance crisis that befell the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA) one year after its passage in 1933. We employ a simple game-theoretic model of the NIRA's cartel enforcement mechanism to show that the compliance crisis can largely be explained by changes in expectations, rather than a change in enforcement policy. Specifically, firms initially overestimated the probability that defection would be met with sanction by the cartel's enabling body, the National Recovery Administration – including a consumer boycott resulting from loss of the patriotic Blue Eagle emblem – and complied with the industry cartel rules. As these expectations were correctly adjusted downward, cartel compliance was lost. We support this hypothesis empirically with industry-level panel data showing how output and wage rates varied according to consumer confidence in the Blue Eagle. The analysis provides insight about cartel performance more generally.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-337-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

K.C. Fraser

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57

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Androniki Kavoura and Evgenia Bitsani

The purpose of this paper is to examine practices for the presentation of specific sites in Greece, and in particular the way the Acropolis, Greece, a World Heritage Site…

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997

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine practices for the presentation of specific sites in Greece, and in particular the way the Acropolis, Greece, a World Heritage Site, is communicated at national, local, and international levels, seeking to identify the policy for the presentation of heritage in the specific venue with its historical and current developments.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents data collected from the analysis of archival documents and interviews with curators who offered the researchers ground to explain the purposes and reasons for the implementation of decisions related to the management of heritage following a case study design.

Findings

The paper argues for the need of a critical approach towards the implementation of communication activities for many sites rather than the world‐renowned ones. Issues that associate with the relationship of heritage with social aspects of the contemporary world receive little attention in the literature, let alone the masked political and economic implications that state governments often do not admit. The projection of the perceived distinct characteristics of a country, nationally and internationally, signifies the role that these properties may have when states present them at national level while retaining their international character.

Originality/value

The article makes a theoretical and practical contribution to the way the marketing of heritage for the Acropolis can consist of a typical recourse for other sites in other areas and is associated with socio‐economic and political implications.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Melanie Feinberg

This study aims to examine how systems for organizing information may present an authorial voice and shows how the mechanism of voice may work to persuasively communicate…

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2000

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how systems for organizing information may present an authorial voice and shows how the mechanism of voice may work to persuasively communicate a point of view on the materials being collected and described by the information system.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper synthesizes a conceptual framework from the field of rhetoric and composition and uses that framework to analyze how existing organizational schemes reveal authorial voice.

Findings

Through textual analysis, the mechanism of authorial voice is described in three example information systems. In two of the examples, authorial voice is shown to function as a persuasive element by enabling identification, the rhetorical construct defined by the literary critic Kenneth Burke. In one example, voice appears inconsistently and does not work to facilitate persuasion.

Research limitations/implications

This study illustrates the concept of authorial voice in the context of information systems, but it does not claim to comprehensively catalog all potential manifestations of authorial voice.

Practical implications

By analyzing how information systems work as a form of document, we can better understand how information systems communicate to their users, and we can use this understanding to facilitate design.

Originality/value

By creating designs that incorporate an enhanced conceptual grasp of authorial voice and other rhetorical properties of information systems, the construction of information systems that systematically and purposefully communicate original, creative points of view regarding their assembled collections can be facilitated, and so enable learning, discovery, and critical engagement for users.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 67 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

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112

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

David Dickson and Owen Hargie

The aim of this piece of research was to detail the scope and nature of sectarianism as experienced by employees, managers and those with trade union responsibilities, in…

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1080

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this piece of research was to detail the scope and nature of sectarianism as experienced by employees, managers and those with trade union responsibilities, in the Northern Ireland workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Four large organizations, two from the private and two from the public sector, were recruited to take part in this qualitative study. In‐depth interviews were carried out with managers and trade union personnel. Focus groups were run with employees.

Findings

Data were submitted to thematic analysis. The major themes to emerge included: the extent of experienced sectarianism, sources of sectarianism, the nature of sectarian harassment, “tolerable” sectarianism, and the management of difference.

Research limitations/implications

Short‐comings of the study include the possibility that social desirability effects could have operated to underplay sectarian attitudes. Again the limitations of a qualitative methodology in providing estimates of the extent of sectarianism in the broader population are acknowledged.

Practical implications

Practical implications of the findings for controlling sectarianism and managing diversity are discussed in terms of organizational formalization, the promotion of a common ingroup workforce identity, and the informal procedures used by employees to manage difference on a day‐to‐day basis.

Originality/value

The study is particularly pertinent, given that there has been little attempt to capture the experiences of sectarianism in workplaces from the perspective of managers, employees and trade union personnel.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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